TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Sun Oct 22, 2017 12:57 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 187 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:29 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Uruguay weighs what to do with Nazi eagle from battleship
By LEONARDO HABERKORN
16 August 2017

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) -- Uruguay's government is asking political and religious leaders what it should do with a Nazi bronze eagle recovered off its coast in 2006, the defense minister said Wednesday.

The eagle was part of the stern of the German battleship Admiral Graf Spee, which sank off Uruguay at the outset of World War II.

Defense Minister Jorge Menendez said he would talk with members of the country's four political parties Wednesday about dealing with the bronze eagle with a swastika under its claws. He met with members of Uruguay's Jewish Central Committee on Tuesday. "Our concern is that the eagle doesn't generate a Nazi sanctuary in Uruguay that will draw Nazis from all over the region," said Israel Buszkaniec, the committee's president. "We'd have no problem if it's sold and leaves the country."

The Graf Spee was considered one of the most sophisticated battleships of its time. It prowled the South Atlantic and sank several Allied merchant ships before warships from Britain and New Zealand tracked it down and damaged it during the "Battle of the River Plate" that began Dec. 13, 1939. The damaged Graf Spee limped into Montevideo harbor where injured and dead sailors were taken ashore. Its captain ordered the ship scuttled, sinking it a few miles from Montevideo to prevent it from falling into enemy hands.

In February 2006, a recovery team removed the eagle, weighing more than 800 pounds, from the ship's stern. It has been kept since then in a navy warehouse. The salvage team initially sued to demand the right to sell the piece. But Uruguay's Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that the eagle belongs to the Uruguayan state. The ruling said, however, that if the piece is sold, the salvage group would have the right to 50 percent of the proceeds.

Opposition lawmaker Jorge Gandini has proposed exhibiting or selling the eagle to raise funds for the Uruguayan military. Former President Julio Maria Sanguinetti suggested in a recent newspaper article that the eagle go on display in Uruguay because of its historical importance. "To imagine that, as some say, it could lead to a certain Nazi cult, is really absurd because it is actually the contrary: It's a monument to their defeat," he wrote.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:19 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
A Nazi eagle inflames a heated debate in Uruguay
By LEONARDO HABERKORN
30 August 2017

Image
In this Feb. 10, 2006 file photo, workers salvage the eagle from the World War II German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee, in Montevideo, Uruguay. Controversy has swirled around the eagle ever since it was recovered and now a battle has broken out over its fate. Suggestions have ranged from exhibiting or auctioning the Third Reich symbol, to keeping it hidden or even destroying it. (AP Photo/Marcelo Hernandez, File)

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) -- A big Nazi eagle with a swastika under its talons is such a divisive symbol that it has been kept hidden inside a sealed crate in a Uruguayan navy warehouse for more than a decade.

The 800-pound bronze piece was part of the stern of the German battleship Admiral Graf Spee that sank off the South American country's coast at the outset of World War II. Controversy has swirled around the eagle ever since it was recovered in 2006, and now a battle has broken out over its fate after the government asked lawmakers and Uruguay's Jewish community what it should do with it.

Suggestions have ranged from exhibiting or auctioning the Third Reich symbol to keeping it hidden or even destroying it. The debate rages as far-right demonstrations, including the one in Charlottesville, Virginia, have created fears of a rise in neo-Nazism. "Our concern is that the eagle doesn't generate a Nazi sanctuary in Uruguay that will draw Nazis from all over the region," said Israel Buszkaniec, president of the country's Jewish Central Committee.

The Graf Spee was a symbol of German naval might early in the war. It prowled the South Atlantic and sank several Allied merchant ships before warships from Britain and New Zealand tracked it down and damaged it during the "Battle of the River Plate" that began on Dec. 13, 1939. The damaged Graf Spee limped into the harbor of Uruguay's capital, Montevideo, where injured and dead sailors were taken ashore. Its captain ordered the ship scuttled, sinking it a few miles from Montevideo to prevent it and its then state-of-the-art technology from falling into Allied hands. Most of the crew was taken by ship to Buenos Aires in neighboring Argentina and the captain killed himself days later.

In 2004, private investors from the United States and Europe funded a multimillion-dollar effort to remove the ship piece by piece from the bottom of the River Plate. In February 2006, a salvage team brought up the eagle. Thousands of curious people gathered at a hotel in Montevideo where it was exhibited. But the exhibition lasted only a couple of months because of controversy surrounding the symbol.

Germany said it was the rightful owner of the eagle and the vessel. Jewish groups asked that the swastika under the eagle's talons be covered with a cloth. Insurance companies demanded a fortune to exhibit the piece. Finally, the eagle was put in the navy warehouse. The salvage team sued to demand the right to sell it. But Uruguay's Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that the eagle belonged to the state. The ruling said, however, that if the piece is sold, the salvage group would have the right to 50 percent of the proceeds. Foreign Minister Rodolfo Nin Novoa recently discarded Germany's claim to the eagle, saying, "What is left is not the ship, but its remains."

Determined to finally decide the fate of the bronze eagle, Defense Minister Jorge Menendez discussed options earlier this month with members of Uruguay's Jewish Central Committee and later with leaders of the country's four main political parties. Gonzalo Reboledo, who represented the governing Broad Front coalition at the meeting, said the government is evaluating the idea of exhibiting the eagle at a museum dedicated to "The Battle of the River Plate."

Other items that have been extracted from the Graf Spee include uniforms with swastikas, the ship's anchor and a cannon. A room at Uruguay's Naval Museum displays a stretcher that was used to carry injured German sailors, binoculars and a medallion carved with Adolf Hitler's name and a swastika.

But nothing inflames debate as much as the eagle. "I wouldn't leave it here. It hasn't been too long since WWII, the Holocaust and 50 million people who died because of the madness of the Nazis," said former lawmaker Julio Aguiar, who opposes exhibiting the eagle. "You look at the United States and it seems crazy that Nazi groups still exist, but they do. And they exist here as well."

Reboledo of the Broad Front said other parties are more inclined to sell it. Opposition lawmaker Jorge Gandini at first proposed that the funds raised go to Uruguay's military but now believes it would be better to exhibit the eagle.

Manuel Esmoris, an expert on national heritage, said the eagle should be melted or donated to London's Imperial War Museum. "It's a dangerous object and there are no controlled sales of pieces like this," he said. "It can be bought by front men who can then sell it to neo-Nazis. There is no other market in the world for this eagle than one linked to neo-Nazis."

Others feel the "Battle of the River Plate" is a part of Uruguay's history and remains engrained in its collective memory. The tombs of German and English sailors who died in the battle are kept in Montevideo, and several members of the Graf Spee's crew lived in Uruguay. Carlos Grossmuller, a popular soccer player, is the grandson of the ship's cook.

Former President Julio Maria Sanguinetti recently suggested the eagle go on display in Uruguay because of its historical importance. "To imagine that, as some say, it could lead to a certain Nazi cult is really absurd because it is actually the contrary: It's a monument to their defeat," he wrote in a newspaper article.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 12:43 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
dragon wrote:
Beloved railroad seen in 'La La Land' chugging back to life
By JOHN ROGERS
March 1, 2017

Image

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Angels Flight, LA's beloved little railroad, had its cameo in the hit musical "La La Land" and now it's almost ready for its close-up.

The narrow-gauge railroad that for more than a century hauled people 298 feet up and down the city's steep Bunker Hill was shut down in 2013 after a series of mishaps, including a crash that killed a rider.

At a news conference Wednesday, Mayor Eric Garcetti said those issues are being resolved and the railroad's antique wooden cars, named Sinai and Olivet, should be back in service by Labor Day. They'll be operated by a public-private partnership between the nonprofit Angels Flight Foundation and the private company ACS Infrastructure Development. "As anyone who has seen 'La La Land' can tell you, dreams do still come true here in Los Angeles," Garcetti said exuberantly as dozens of cheering Angels Flight fans crowded together with reporters to hear his announcement just outside the railway's bottom-of-the-hill station.

The railroad's resurrection has been planned for months, but it may have gotten an unexpected boost when moviegoers saw Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling riding happily in one of the cars in "La La Land." Many took to social media to ask why they couldn't ride too. That scene was just one of several film shoots the funicular has appeared in, said John Wellborne, past chairman of the Angels Flight Railway Foundation. But, he added with a chuckle, "It got a lot more attention than we anticipated."

Meanwhile, some work still needs to be done before the cars can move again under an agreement reached with the state Public Utilities Commission. That includes upgrading its funicular system in which the two cars' counterbalancing weights allow one to be pulled up safely while the other is lowered. An emergency ramp must also be installed next to the railroad tracks so that if the cars break down in mid-run, as they did in 2013, firefighters won't have to rescue the passengers this time.

Despite its recent woes, Angels Flight, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, holds a special place in the hearts of LA residents of all ages who will tell you countless stories of coming downtown to ride it during their childhood. "I was 5 years old," said Ron Lozano, who still vividly recalls the short trip as being his first thrill ride. "I didn't get to Disneyland until I was 17. It was heartbreaking when it shut down," said the engineer who for years worked in a downtown skyscraper overlooking the tracks.

Angels Flight opened on New Year's Eve 1901, hauling residents from Bunker Hill's stately Victorian mansions down to one of the city's best shopping districts. Rides cost a penny. It operated until 1969 when it was shut down as the neighborhood, having fallen on hard times, underwent redevelopment. It reopened in 1996, just as the area was beginning to undergo a renaissance. For the next few years it carried thousands of tourists and office workers from the skyscrapers, museums and fashionable hotels that sprung up on Bunker Hill to the Grand Central Market below.

It was shut down after a catastrophic system failure sent one car crashing into the other in 2001, killing a passenger. Reopened in 2010, it was closed three years later after a derailment stranded riders.

Source: AP

LA's popular Angels Flight reaching for the heavens again
By JOHN ROGERS
August 31, 2017

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Angels Flight, the beloved little railroad that's almost as much a symbol of Los Angeles as the Hollywood Sign, began pulling people toward the heavens and back down again Thursday after four years of idleness triggered by a 2013 derailment.

Mayor Eric Garcetti and other supporters and admirers of the funky little funicular turned out on a blazingly hot downtown morning to see the train's two wooden antique cars, Olivet and Sinai, officially return to service. "This is a railway that always had a little engine that could," Garcetti said of the 116-year-old railway that stretches only 298 feet (90 meters) up downtown's stunningly steep Bunker Hill. "It is one of the last relics of Victorian Los Angeles, an iconic LA landmark and it's right up there with the Griffith Park Observatory and the Hollywood Sign."

He added that just like those landmarks it's made frequent cameo appearances in movies, including last year's Oscar-nominated film "La La Land" when Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling climbed aboard for a romantic ride.

Later, with a thumb's up, Garcetti led a small delegation of officials and longtime riders onto the train and up the hill. A few minutes later he returned in the other car. "It was great," he said afterward, dismissing concerns of a couple first-time riders that the old railroad cars seemed to shake and shimmy unnervingly, especially as they passed each other. A veteran rider, Garcetti noted the train's two cars have always done that, particularly when they pass on a three-track section of railway in the middle. "Those are just a couple of historic bumps," he added with a grin. "Don't be alarmed."

Earlier he'd assured people the railroad, ordered closed by the state after the 2013 derailment, had been restored to the highest safety standards. A funicular, Angels Flight operates by using the counterbalancing weights of its cars to pull one up while the other descends. When the two cars pass they are no more than an inch or two apart, adding to the excitement of the ride. Angels Flight was still closed when Gosling and Stone rode it in "La La Land" last year, to the surprise of the public and state officials.

While it was idled its cars were badly scarred by graffiti in 2015, prompting thousands to petition the mayor to get it back in service but something else happened. They were spruced up and freshly repainted for Thursday's run.

"I'm thrilled to see it back again," said 71-year-old Los Angeles periodontist Gordon Pattison, who like countless other Los Angeles natives has countless childhood memories of taking a scenic ride up and down the railway. "I think the first time I rode it was in my mother's arms. In 1946," said Pattison, who rode it again Thursday.

Roundtrips cost a penny when Angels Flight opened in 1901. They cost $1 now with a 50-cent discount for those who pay with a transit card. It was a must-take ride for tourists and locals alike when it closed in 1969 for a decades-long redevelopment project that saw Bunker Hill's mansions replaced by high-rise office buildings, hotels, luxury apartments and museums.

Four years after it reopened in 1996 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. It was closed again in 2001, however, after a failure of the counterbalancing system caused a crash that killed one rider and injured several others. The railway finally reopened in 2010, only to be closed three years later after riders had to be rescued.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2017 8:17 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
'Lost' sanctuary of Artemis Amarysia discovered after century-long search
22 September 2017

Archaeologists have found the Sanctuary of Artemis Amarysia, a major site of worship described in ancient texts that had remained stubbornly elusive, after a search lasting more than a century, the Greek culture ministry announced.

The existence of the Sanctuary or 'Artemision' had been well documented but efforts to locate it had failed until the Swiss School of Archaeology in Greece uncovered its remains in an excavation near the modern village of Amarynthos in Evia. Archaeologists were finally able to confirm that the Amarynthos remains were those of the Artemision through evidence uncovered in the summer of 2017.

Artemis Amarysia was worshipped as the main divinity of the Eretrian state, as indicated by inscriptions and coins. Evidence suggested that it should be located near Amarynthos, some 10km east of Eretria, while the Swiss school also enlisted geophysical surveys and test trenches, together with the XIth Greek Ephorate of Evia, in order to discover the sanctuary.

Evidence uncovered in 2017 that confirms the sanctuary's location include a series of buildings dating from the 6th to 2nd centuries BC, an underground fountain built from scavenged and re-used architectural elements, as well as inscriptions bearing the name 'Artemis' and referring to dedications to Artemis, Apollo and their mother Leto.

Work on the site had begun in 2007, led by Karl Reber and the head of the Evia Antiquities Ephorate Amalia Karapaschalidou, with promising results. While its existence was known from references made by the ancient geographer Strabo, these same texts had stymied earlier attempts to find the sanctuary since they misreported the distance between the sanctuary and the city of Eretria, which was not seven stadia (1.5 km) as Strabo claimed but closer to 60 stadia (11 km).

Source: Athens-Macedonian News Agency

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:59 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Long-lost Rodin sculpture found in New Jersey borough hall
October 12, 2017

MADISON, N.J. (AP) -- A bust of Napoleon by French sculptor Auguste Rodin long thought to be lost has been found on display in a New Jersey borough hall where it sat for 85 years.

The bust's origin was confirmed in 2015, but officials waited to reveal the multimillion dollar artwork was a long-lost piece by Rodin on Wednesday. The Record reports the owners of the bust announced it will be leaving the Madison borough hall on loan to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The authentication was made in person by Jerome Le Blay, an international expert in modern sculpture. Madison's Mayor Robert Conley says he had always heard rumors that the bust was a Rodin work, but having it verified was impressive.

Information from: The Record (Woodland Park, N.J.), http://www.northjersey.com
Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:55 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Hidden film treasures brought to life in British vault
by Rosie SCAMMELL
14 October 2017

BERKHAMSTED, England (AFP) - In a refrigerated vault outside London filled with old film reels, a team of curators is bringing to life forgotten masterpieces of early cinema history.

A chemical smell hangs in the air at the British Film Institute's National Archive, where some 250,000 wheels of old film are stacked floor-to-ceiling. "As we're restoring them we're pulling back the veils of history, and we can see much more clearly than we used to," curator Bryony Dixon told AFP on a visit to the archive in the town of Berkhamsted this week.

A selection plucked from the shelves is being showcased at the BFI's London Film Festival, including a tale about the heartbreaking Indian love story of the Taj Mahal mausoleum. "Shiraz: A Romance of India" is being screened at a gala on Saturday for the first time since its release in 1928, following months of restoration. "It's beautiful, it's dramatic, it's got exciting locations, and great acting. And it's unique, there are almost no surviving Indian films from that era, so it's very special," Dixon said. A score by composer Anoushka Shankar, daughter of late Indian sitar maestro Ravi Shankar, has also been added to accompany the silent film.

BFI curators have restored a wealth of films including Alfred Hitchcock's nine surviving silent films and footage of a legendary Everest expedition in 1924 in which two of the climbers died.

Despite technological leaps, preparing the film begins with it being checked by hand. "There will be a lot of hand, manual repair on the original film copies, using tape to make sure the films can pass through cleaning machines, and also through the scanner," said Kieron Webb, the archive's film conservation manager.

The team used the original camera negative of "Shiraz", along with a copy made decades later, which were combined digitally to obtain the best images and restore tens of thousands of frames. "The removal of scratches and dirt; de-flicker, which makes the image look more stable; reduce the light and darkness changes in some shots," said Webb, summarising hundreds of hours of work.

Ben Thompson, an image quality section leader, demonstrated how to remove a scratch from a "Shiraz" scene without accidentally brushing out a horse's leg. Restorers have also sharpened the images, which Thompson said creates more work: "As soon as you improve the sharpness of the image it reveals, brings into sharp focus the detail but also the defects." Digital techniques, which have replaced much of the old photo-chemical processes, have enabled restorers to become more precise in their work and upgrade every single shot in a film such as "Shiraz".

The Indian film is nearly 90 years old but BFI also holds films going as far back as the 1890s. Despite the films' age, curators said they were easier to restore due to their brevity. "Some of them are only a minute long," Dixon said.

"With the 1920s it gets much more complex, because the films get longer and they have a grammar to them which means if you're missing part of the film print, you have to sort of compensate in order to make it understandable for the audience." Colour and sound add further layers of complexity, although silent films are themselves problematic because they often lack any documents to dictate the speed they should be shown at.

Restoration is a costly endeavour and the archive relies on public funds and private donors, as well as ticket sales from screenings. But the restorers say the cultural value is boundless, giving audiences a window into an unseen age and places that have since disappeared. "Fiction film, or non-fiction film, is this fantastic record of the whole of the 20th century that people can look at... It is, for those that care to look, a real experience," said Dixon.

Source: AFP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:19 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 7885
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Roman theater uncovered at base of Jerusalem's Western Wall
By ILAN BEN ZION
16 October 2017

JERUSALEM (AP) -- Israeli archaeologists on Monday announced the discovery of the first known Roman-era theater in Jerusalem's Old City, a unique structure around 1,800 years old that abuts the Western Wall and may have been built during Roman Emperor Hadrian's reign.

The edifice's elegant masonry was found during excavations carried out in the past two years below the Western Wall tunnels, a warren of ancient subterranean passageways running alongside a contested Jerusalem holy site built by King Herod in the first century B.C. The excavations plunged over 6 meters (20 feet) below ground, exposing eight previously uncovered courses of the Temple Mount's western retaining wall.

Jews consider the Temple Mount the holiest site on earth, while Muslims refer to the walled compound as the Noble Sanctuary and consider it the third holiest after Mecca and Medina. It was the site of two Jewish temples in antiquity - the second renovated and expanded by Herod - and today is home to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and Dome of the Rock.

Joe Uziel, an Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist heading the dig, said that the theater-like structure is believed to date to the second or third centuries - the period after Rome razed the city in 70 and the Emperor Hadrian rebuilt it in the mid-second century as a Roman colony, Aelia Capitolina.

Ancient historical accounts mentioned the presence of theaters in Roman-era Jerusalem, but until now archaeologists had not found any of the structures. Uziel speculates that the unfinished semi-circular theater may have been intended to serve as a small odeon, a venue for musical or theatric performances, or a bouleuterion, a place of assembly for the colony's municipal officials.

It was relatively small, and might have been designed to seat around 200 people. The excavations have exposed the first row of seats, orchestra area, and part of the stage. Wilson's Arch, part of a monumental causeway leading into the temple that soars above the theater, may have been employed for its acoustic properties. "One of the amazing things is that because we're beneath an arch, they would have had the arch to use as their roof," Uziel said.

What remains unanswered is why the building wasn't finished. "After putting in all this effort of building such a grandiose building, what would cause them to stop," Uziel wondered and suggested that the outbreak of the second Jewish revolt against Rome, from 132-135, could have halted construction and left the theater unfinished.

Zeev Weiss, a Roman archaeologist at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who wasn't involved in the excavation, said the discovery of such a central civic building was "a great find." Most of the major public structures from Roman Jerusalem - the large theater, forum, basilica and bathhouse - remain undiscovered. "Hopefully one day those will be found as well," Weiss said.

Uziel hopes further excavation of the theater will better inform scholars about daily life in Roman Jerusalem in the decades after Jerusalem and its temple were razed. "I believe that this is one of the indications that also during that period between the Second Temple and between the rise of Christianity, Jerusalem was also an important Roman colony, not just a wasteland, no-man's land where the legion sat around," he said.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 187 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group