TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 12:00 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 82 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:14 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Music, films help promote sex education in Indonesia
October 29, 2014

Image

Hundreds of young visitors cheered as they listened to prominent singer Kartika “Tika” Jahja sing the lines: “Ini [tubuh] milikku […] bukan parameter moralitas dan harga diri” (This body is mine and not a parameter of morality and self-respect) at a free concert promoting sex education at Taman Menteng in Central Jakarta.

“Why don’t we ever talk about sex? Sex education is important. Saying that sex education encourages premarital sex is the same as saying that life jackets make airplanes crash,” Tika said on Sunday to a crowd of fans screaming in agreement.

Tika and her band, The Dissidents, were among 11 local music acts who performed at the Seperlima Festival, organized by Seperlima — a group of five organizations, namely Pamflet, the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (PKBI), the Center for Education and Information on Islam and Women’s Rights Issues (Rahima), Dutch NGO Hivos and the University of Indonesia’s (UI) Gender and Sexuality Research Center.

More than 1,000 visitors, donning colorful head scarves and some heavily tattooed, arrived with their friends and families to participate in Seperlima’s third festival. “I got information about the event on Twitter and I wanted to come because [youth band] Dialog Dini Hari was playing. But then I found out that it was also a campaigning event for sex education. That’s so cool,” university student Fanny said.

Four movies by young directors were also screened for the audience, followed by a discussion with the directors and actors. One of the movies, Bernadette directed by Paul Agusta, was based on a true story of a young prostitute who was physically abused by a client but was rescued by someone who spotted her injured on the street. Several people in the audience gasped when the rescuer was arrested instead of the abuser at the end of the movie. Pamflet coordinator Afra Suci Ramadhan said the four movies were chosen for the event because of their underlying themes of sexuality and identity.

Separately, Dyana “Vina” Savina from Hivos said that Seperlima chose to hold the event to reach Indonesian youths, as many were interested in music and movies. “Many of the problems we are trying to tackle — underage marriage, lack of knowledge about puberty, sexual abuse and bullying — can be solved merely by providing proper sex education,” she said.

During the event, visitors also lined up excitedly to write messages on colorful plastic sheets that were hung on a line. One sheet read: “Fulfill transgender rights!” while another read: “Smart teenagers appreciate differences.” “I think it’s [sex education] needed in schools. It’s important,” 16-year-old Robby said as he decided what to write on his plastic sheet.

PKBI member Muvitasari said that Seperlima also provided training for teachers in six provinces on how to teach sex education to their students, in addition to hosting fun events.

Source: Jakarta Post.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 5:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Pakistani TV talkshow breaks taboo on discussing sex
10 December 2014
By Zia Khan

Image
Pakistan's first talkshow to tackle sex problems - © Health TV, EPA

Islamabad (dpa) - Adeel Mohsin always thinks about possible repercussions when he decides which caller to put on the air during his TV show discussing sexual problems in Pakistan.

It would be an easy job in many countries but is an everyday struggle in the conservative Islamic society, where public discussion about sex is still taboo. "A slight miscalculation can ruin you," said Mohsin, the producer of the Clinic Online show at HTV (Health TV), which specializes in fashion and lifestyle.

The channel, based in the southern city of Karachi, started the call-in show two years ago to discuss problems related to dermatology and gynecology, but slowly moved it towards sex. "We were a bit shy initially," HTV programme manager Muhammad Khawar said. "It was taboo in Pakistan and still is ... but the response from viewers encourages us to go ahead with the idea."

Sex has always been off-limits for public debate in the conservative Islamic society, where the social narrative is dominated by a radical interpretation of the religion. A decade of violence orchestrated by al-Qaeda and Taliban militants has made it ever-harder for media to touch issues as delicate as sex.

Lack of exposure to effective sex education causes physical and psychological damage to millions of young people in Pakistan, doctor Imran Sadiq Chaudhry said. "The scale of the problem is indescribable," said Chaudhry, who runs a clinic and a website to help youth understand and cope with sexual complexities.

But the new show seems to be having an impact, and people now feel comfortable discussing their problems online. "People are increasingly confident in sharing their anxieties," said Mohsin. "They feel they have a platform now." But his pioneering approach has landed him in some delicate situations. Four weeks ago, he was uncertain whether to air a call from a woman from the eastern city of Lahore seeking advice to tame her young nephew whose sexual impulses were threatening the female members of the family. "It was difficult for me to decide whether I should allow a caller discussing incest," he said, "but then I thought it is a genuine problem and the public should know about it."

Image
Pakistan's first talkshow to tackle sex problems - © Health TV, EPA

Despite being able to create some space, the management at the channel still has to be cautious about religious and social values to avoid backlash from public. "We live in a Muslim society and frankly you never know how people are going to react," said doctor Nadeem Siddiqui, the consultant who hosts the show. "That's why I always ask callers to turn to religion to solve their problems. "If I don't do that it will be very hard to run the show," said Siddiqui, who studied medicine in Britain.

His simple advice for a young woman who said she had developed the habit of pleasuring herself was to pray to Allah, stop watching pornography and read religious literature. In most cases, people's sexual problems emanate from a lack of awareness, the doctor said. "That's what we strive to achieve," Siddiqui explained. "We want people to understand sex as an issue like any other ... We encourage them to reveal things rather than conceal them."

Response to the show is clearly divided across Pakistan's liberal-conservative divide. Liberals and rights activists hail it as a step forward in creating awareness, while conservatives find it outrageous and exhibitionist. "It is a sin tantamount to inviting the wrath of Allah to discuss sex in public," said Maulana Amir Siddiq, an Islamic cleric based in the capital Islamabad.

But activist Sehrish Amin sees it quite differently. "It is awesome. It gives a voice to so many people who would never find any other place to share their anxieties."

Source: dpa.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 5:35 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Sex education from church and state sends mixed messages in Vietnam
by Marianne Brown
Monday, 15 December 2014

Image
A clinic offering 4D foetus imaging in Hanoi. For decades, communist Vietnam enforced a two-child policy, using a mix of administrative penalties and subsidised family planning. Photograph: Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

On a Saturday morning, about 100 people gather for mass at Thai Ha church in Hanoi.

During the sermon, the priest talks about the dangers of sex before marriage and the sin of killing an unborn child. Behind the pews, on a table, sits a small coffin containing foetuses and stillborn babies collected by volunteers over the week from private clinics. Today there are 13 in the box.

“Sometimes we collect over 100,” says Tran Thi Huong, a woman in her 50s, who is among a small but growing group of anti-abortion activists in north Vietnam. Huong says more young people are having premarital sex and that the prevalence of abortion in Vietnamese society encourages women to do it freely. “The education system for the last 60 years has taught people that abortion is normal,” she says.

The activists hand out leaflets at student residences warning young people about having sex before marriage. They provide a phone number and offer “consultation” services for women seeking abortions.

The phone number belongs to 45-year-old Maria Nguyet Thi Huyen. “We teach people not to have sex before marriage,” she says. “We try to advise young people the true value of love. If they are already having sex, we tell them to be responsible, to protect life and build a family.” Her advice includes having sex on “safe” days and other methods prescribed by the Catholic church. They also offer a place at a mo nha (open house) where the mother will be looked after until her baby is born.

Vietnam has a high abortion rate, although exact figures are difficult to obtain because many procedures take place at private clinics, from which official data is not collected. A survey by the Population Council in 2012 of 901 women in Thai Binh province said 43% of respondents had had at least one pregnancy terminated; a third had two or more.

The high abortion rates have been attributed to a preference for sons, and to not using contraception. However, Huong says abortion has also been “promoted” by the government as a form of contraception because of its widespread availability and as a result of its two-child policy. In the 1980s, the government encouraged small families, ideally with two children, which meant some state workers and members of the Communist party could risk losing their positions if they had more than two.

Ton Van der Velden has worked in sexual and reproductive health in Vietnam for nearly 10 years, and is now country director of Medical Committee Netherlands-Vietnam. He says education is a problem, but argues for a different approach. Church activists want educators to teach abstinence, but Van der Velden says educators should say: if you have sex, use proper contraception. “Education is too limited to the biological, and abstinence is still strongly promoted,” he says. Vietnamese society is a very conservative, he says, adding: “School is a public place and people don’t want to state those subjects publicly.”

Trang*, 32, from Hanoi, had an abortion 10 years ago. “When I was in the ninth grade in school, we should have been taught about this but all we were told is that a baby is made when the sperm and the egg meet together – we weren’t told how they met.”

However, by the time she was in a sexual relationship, she knew about contraceptives from a book that her mother had surreptitiously left in a bookcase. She became pregnant despite taking a morning-after pill. “I discovered I was pregnant one month before our wedding,” she says. “I wanted to have an abortion because I didn’t want people asking questions when the baby was born. Also, I had taken some antibiotics and I was worried about the baby’s health.”

Despite conservative attitudes at school, awareness of contraception is high. According to a survey conducted by the Vietnamese government, the World Health Organisation and the the UN Children’s Fund (Unicef) in 2010, more than 90% of respondents knew about contraception. Yet the high abortion rate persists.

Van der Velden says there are several reasons for this. Social stigma can make it difficult for young people to buy contraceptives, and discussing contraception is difficult between couples. Rumours about the health risks of contraceptives are also to blame.

Abortion may be common – Trang says only one of her friends has not had a termination – but the emotional burden is not adequately addressed. Trang says she was offered no advice before the procedure. She wore her wedding ring at the health clinic so she could “avoid questions”, but that didn’t stop the doctor from expressing her disdain. “I don’t think the doctor gave me any painkillers, it was so painful. But when I cried out, she told me I had done something bad and I should pay the consequences. She said I would not be able to have a child after that and I was so worried.”

Linh* had an abortion when she was 26 at a private hospital in Hanoi. “The staff didn’t tell me anything. They pinned the photo of the ultrasound on my hospital gown and I had to walk through the hospital with it there like a badge or something. I was really upset,” she says.

Anti-abortion activists argue that they are providing help and advice to women who would otherwise be left on their own. But Van der Velden argues that support is available from medical professionals. “If you go to any hospital and say ‘I’m pregnant but I’m not sure and I’d like to talk about it’, that service is there,” he says. “But the problem is that young people don’t know that service is there. Government agencies don’t reach out in that way.”

Linh says she is glad she was not approached by church activists. “If someone told me I was committing a sin or something, it would not have helped me at all,” she says. “I just wanted support before and after the abortion, not someone blaming me.”

• Names have been changed to protect people
Source: Guardian.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:58 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
India's top 'sexpert' still telling it straight at 91
By Peter Hutchison
3 September 2015

A 91-year-old Indian "sexpert" whose popular tabloid column has drawn both fans and critics with its straight-talking approach, provides a lifeline to readers in what remains a conservative society bereft of proper sex education.

And although most of his queries still come from men, Mahinder Watsa told AFP that more women are now seeking his daily dose of advice in the Mumbai Mirror. "When I first started writing 'Ask the Sexpert', almost none of the letters I received were from women but now it's around 30 percent," said Watsa, India's leading sexologist, who gets about 80 queries a day. "At the beginning women weren't so frank but now they are expressing themselves in ways that they never used to. Women are becoming more open and saying, 'Well if men can have fun, why can't we also'," he added.

Watsa, an obstetrician and gynaecologist by profession, has enlightened and entertained readers in India's financial capital for over a decade with his words of wisdom, which are often funny as well as informative. His matter-of-fact approach, including using words such as vagina and penis instead of common euphemisms, has helped fill a void in a country where sex education is controversial and often non-existent. "There are many states in India which don't have sex education in schools so young people are left all on their own and there is a lot of confusion," Watsa explained. "The point is, where do people get their knowledge from? Even today most doctors in India are not very experienced in dealing with sexuality problems."

Watsa pioneered the teaching of sex education through his work with the Family Planning Association of India before starting his column, but has faced opposition from conservative elements in the country. He said he had encountered "resistance" to his workshops in the early years of his career. "In the beginning people would get very upset when I put up a slide of a penis showing it diagrammatically. But then they started to get used to it." Watsa added that a couple of complaints had been made to the police about the Mirror column, claiming that "children had been reading it and getting wrong ideas".

'It's Normal!'

But the nonagenarian has remained undeterred. "People who read it are more knowledgeable about sex, which is very wise because you can get into a lot of trouble," Watsa said, referring to the risk of unwanted pregnancies or sexually transmitted diseases.

He takes a caring tone with women's concerns but is renowned for his witty and sometimes sarcastic replies to certain readers' queries. He also doesn't hesitate to give short shrift to some, particularly men asking how they can prove a wife-to-be has not had sex before.

"My family is demanding that I get married. How can I ascertain if the girl is a virgin?" read one question. Watsa replied: "I suggest you don't get married. Unless you appoint detectives, there is no way to find out. Spare any poor girl of your suspicious mind."

"Sometimes you have to be a little harsh in how you say it and make them feel a little angry with you," Watsa explained. "When they feel angry they start thinking and when they start thinking they start to improve."

The majority of the emails that Watsa receives are from men expressing concerns about masturbation -- whether it leads to hair loss is a common theme -- and how to stop premature ejaculation. Some letters are bizarre, such as the man who asked if it was OK to cheat on his wife with his pet goat, but Watsa insists the handful that are printed in the newspaper every day are genuine. "A lot of people think it's made up but I tell them that I can't even think of some of the questions that come in," he told AFP. "I've been doing this for a long time, so I can tell pretty quickly whether someone is trying to pull my leg."

The sex therapist has just released a book entitled "It's Normal!" and is something of a celebrity in Mumbai with his own Facebook fan page, but he's unperturbed by the fame. "Nobody dislikes recognition and when people comment on the column it's nice, but I'm too old to get carried away," said the sprightly Watsa, who turns 92 in February and has no plans to slow down. "They say the column has a big following and sells the paper so I'll continue for as long as the paper wants me to, unless I get Alzheimer's or something," he added, smiling.

Source: Yahoo! AFP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:41 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Sex Ed Classes Spark Russia's Children's Ombudsman's Outrage
November 5, 2015

Image
Denis Abramov / Vedomosti - Russian children's rights ombudsman Pavel Astakhov.

Russian children's ombudsman Pavel Astakhov has demanded that the Siberian city of Tyumen stop giving sexual education classes in schools, the RIA Novosti news agency reported Thursday.

Astakhov asked the regional governor’s office to take measures against the classes, calling them an “amateur performance."

The ombudsman's move came after a similarly outraged letter from an NGO called the Tyumen Parents Committee. On Oct. 30, the committee published an article saying the lessons called “A Spermatozoid Journey” for fourth-grade pupils were inappropriate. The lessons were aimed at explaining to schoolchildren how the human reproductive system works, but the committee considered the classes “seductive” and “schizophrenic,” the article says.

Previously, the Tyumen Parents Committee had also complained about the lessons “Women's Hygiene and Physiology” and “Moral Aspects of Sexual Upbringing,” the ura.ru online news agency reported in October.

Source: Moscow Times.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2016 5:47 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Human rights group seeks LGBT-inclusive school curriculum in Japan
By Keiji Hirano
4 November 2016

TOKYO (Kyodo) — A human rights group is urging the Japanese government to give ample consideration to sexual minority students in compiling educational guidelines and teacher training programs, in a proposal to fully protect lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender children from harassment and bullying at school.

Given a lack of an LGBT-inclusive curriculum, students in Japan receive inaccurate and biased information about LGBT people from teachers, Kanae Doi, Japan director of Human Rights Watch, told Kyodo News in a recent interview. “It is necessary to enable teachers, through comprehensive training, to adequately respond to consultations by LGBT students and make it obligatory to cover LGBT issues in classrooms, rather than leaving it optional, to shed light on the minority children,” she said.

Doi has delivered these messages to lawmakers and education ministry officials during meetings with them, as a once-a-decade revision of official curriculum guidelines is now under way. The proposal is based on recent research by Human Rights Watch, for which the international rights body interviewed more than 100 people nationwide, including LGBT students who revealed heartbreaking episodes, as well as teachers, government officials and lawyers.

According to the report on the study, the group found Japanese schools focus on keeping school harmony, rather than protecting vulnerable students. The group was also aware of “pervasive homophobic environments across all types and levels of schools,” while pointing out that strict gender segregation, seen in school uniform polices and gender-segregated activities, makes it difficult for gender nonconforming children to lead desirable school lives.

A man, who came out as gay when he was a high school student, said during an interview that his teachers had told him his admission broke the harmony of the school, according to the report. A physical education teacher told him other students think what he did was a joke and that “by even standing next to you, people will think I’m gay too,” the report noted.

An 18-year-old lesbian in Nagoya, who has not come out, said she was shocked at the age of 16 when a home economics teacher told female students that their responsibility in life is to get married to a man and have children. “I got really upset during the lesson and I started to panic. I couldn’t breathe. I started crying.”

Meanwhile, a transgender student was told by his teachers his sense of discomfort as a girl is a temporary thing and that he would grow out of it — comments, he said, made him deeply sad because he had “so much respect for the teachers but they knew nothing about me,” the report said. According to a lawyer interviewed by Human Rights Watch, several schools allow transgender students to wear uniforms and have access to lavatories and school activities in accordance with their gender identity. But “such approaches by schools appear to be the exception rather than the norm,” the group said.

Many transgender students are at odds with their sense of self and hence feel humiliated when they are required to use toilets and lockers that do not correspond to their gender identity. Since they are forced into compliance, “their rights to receive equal education, including access to toilets and dressing rooms in accordance with their gender identity, are denied,” Doi said.

LGBT teachers must also run the gauntlet. Interviewees said they remain reluctant to come out at school, not because of fears of losing their jobs but because of concerns of losing the respect of their students and peers, the report said. “As a result, LGBT students have no adult role models whom they know to be LGBT, increasing their sense of isolation,” it added.

According to a separate survey mentioned in the report of nearly 6,000 teachers in Japan from kindergarten through high school levels, around 70 percent said LGBT issues should be included in the curriculum. However, less than 14 percent have experiences of discussing it in classrooms. According to the survey, just 8 percent of respondents said they learned about sexuality during their teacher training, and only nine percent about transgender issues, while more than 60 percent said they want to receive sexual diversity training, if it exists.

Given these findings, Doi said, “All teachers need to be trained so they can properly deal with sexual minority students, based on an assumption that there are LGBT students in their classrooms.” Doi, on the other hand, welcomes some steps initiated by the education ministry, which, for example, created booklets about sexual minority children for teachers and other school employees with the aim of improving the environment for them at school. The booklet noted, “It is possible that gender identity and sexual orientation are touched upon as part of human rights education.” In keeping with the promising move, “the government should use the current 2016 curriculum revision process as an opportunity to make concrete progress toward protecting all students,” Doi said.

An education ministry official who was contacted for this article, said while the government is aware of HRW’s proposal, it has no comment on the situation at this time. Human rights issues of sexual minorities have gradually drawn public attention in Japan, with some local governments starting to issue certificates recognizing same-sex partnership as being equivalent to marriage.

Source: Kyodo via Japan Today

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 9:04 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Period of change: the women fighting to break Hong Kong's menstruation taboo
By Elizabeth Beattie
20 August 2017

In a sex-toy shop nestled in the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay, a quiet revolution is taking place.

Amid the usual paraphernalia you might expect on the shelves of Sally’s Toys is a stack of menstrual cups, a clue to the outlet’s second life. Once a week, the shop hosts education sessions for women on a taboo subject: periods.

Miki So, 24, is the brains behind the menstruation information sessions at Sally’s. After spending hours educating women one-on-one about menstruation, their bodies and the menstrual cup in the store, So decided that developing a workshop would make more sense. “Hong Kong females, they don’t tend to share their personal experiences with others, which is [typical] in Asian society … they always cover what they feel or what they want to say,” she says. “In the workshop you can feel they have many questions they want to ask, but they don’t have the platform for them to voice these, so at the workshop they can talk about the things they can’t in daily life.”

For women in Hong Kong who have periods, the options are slim. Most pharmacies, department stores and supermarkets offer a great wall of sanitary pads, while tampons and other options are typically unavailable or less visible. Although tampons are available online, they remain uncommon. Also barely visible is any discussion around menstruation. But growing numbers of young women are attempting to change this.

With women in Hong Kong typically working long hours (Hong Kong has the longest working week of any country in the world), the fear of toxic shock syndrome can be a deterrent from using tampons, So says. This has resulted in women seeking alternative sanitary products, such as the menstrual cup.

‘When I had my first period, I thought I was going to die’

The workshops, which are held in Cantonese, sometimes see self-conscious women donning disguises such as large hats and medical-style face masks as they make their way to the sessions. Nevertheless, the number of attendees, aged between 18 and 50, has been increasing. So is acutely aware of the stigma that exists around menstruation – both through the women she encounters and her own experiences. “When I had my first period, I thought I was going to die,” she recalls. “Because my mother didn’t teach me … then my first period was a very light flow – so I thought it was like a disease or something. I put tissue paper into my panties … then my mum found out there was blood on my trousers and she said ‘that is your period and here is a pad’, and then nothing.”

So is not alone in her quest to normalise menstruation in Hong Kong. Two sociology graduates from the the University of Hong Kong, Jessie Leung and Joyce Fung, both 22, are the founders of a Facebook page called MenstruAction. The site’s mission states: “Join us to challenge the menstrual status quo of shame, silence and secrecy. Love it and embrace it.”

The page is a result of the women’s research project. While classmates were studying more traditional topics such as minorities within Hong Kong, Fung and Leung saw the project as an opportunity to encourage cultural change. MenstruAction’s message is that women in Hong Kong should be aware of all the options and ought to have the freedom to explore them. They also want to challenge the stigma that surrounds this topic.

Both graduates say menstruation in Hong Kong remains taboo. According to Chinese traditions, women are not able to visit temples when they have their periods. They also cannot burn incense. Leung says traditionalists often “think menstruation is dirty”.

For young women who grow up within traditional families, the lack of openness about periods produces a sense of shame. “If a mother does not talk about menstruation to her daughters, it becomes a taboo,” Fung says. She has challenged this dynamic by bringing the conversation into her home, and discussing it openly with both her parents. “I tried to educate my dad … and we can actually talk about it; when I’ve got menstro pain, he can actually help me,” Fung says. “It’s very important in the sense that men can also understand how we feel and they can also understand what it is. It’s something that leads to reproduction. It’s nothing to be ashamed of.”

‘Seventeen or eighteen – that was my first time knowing tampons’

Currently, sex education is not mandatory in schools in Hong Kong. When Fung was at school, as a form of sex education, she and her classmates received a visit from a sanitary pad company. “The discussion about menstruation was by the menstro pad company. They went to our schools and then they gave out menstro pads. The boys and girls were separated. “They would say ‘OK, you’ve started bleeding, this is what you should use’. It was kind of a dictatorship,” Fung says.

So had a similar experience. After a brief school discussion about contraception and sexually transmitted diseases, girls and boys were separated before lining up in the fitting room to receive sanitary pads. “Seventeen or eighteen – that was my first time knowing tampons,” she says.

So says quality sex education and a normalised view of human reproduction and menstruation is something she wants to see. In her spare time, she also works for NGO Sticky Rice Love, an online sex education platform that promotes educational resources for young people.

Fung and Leung say talking openly has already helped enlighten some of their friends and allay concerns about insertion-based methods, such as the menstrual cup. “Still a lot of people don’t know about it and have many misconceptions towards the cup, they say it’s not very hygienic … A lot of our friends even questioned ‘how do you pee when you use the menstro cup?’ They don’t know your vagina and urinary tract are two different organs,” Fung says. “So we start from these types of questions, we clear these misconceptions, and that’s how these kinds of ideas get more and more accepted.”

Source: Guardian UK

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 82 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group