TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:32 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 139 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2016 5:49 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8390
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Human rights group seeks LGBT-inclusive school curriculum in Japan
By Keiji Hirano
4 November 2016

TOKYO (Kyodo) — A human rights group is urging the Japanese government to give ample consideration to sexual minority students in compiling educational guidelines and teacher training programs, in a proposal to fully protect lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender children from harassment and bullying at school.

Given a lack of an LGBT-inclusive curriculum, students in Japan receive inaccurate and biased information about LGBT people from teachers, Kanae Doi, Japan director of Human Rights Watch, told Kyodo News in a recent interview. “It is necessary to enable teachers, through comprehensive training, to adequately respond to consultations by LGBT students and make it obligatory to cover LGBT issues in classrooms, rather than leaving it optional, to shed light on the minority children,” she said.

Doi has delivered these messages to lawmakers and education ministry officials during meetings with them, as a once-a-decade revision of official curriculum guidelines is now under way. The proposal is based on recent research by Human Rights Watch, for which the international rights body interviewed more than 100 people nationwide, including LGBT students who revealed heartbreaking episodes, as well as teachers, government officials and lawyers.

According to the report on the study, the group found Japanese schools focus on keeping school harmony, rather than protecting vulnerable students. The group was also aware of “pervasive homophobic environments across all types and levels of schools,” while pointing out that strict gender segregation, seen in school uniform polices and gender-segregated activities, makes it difficult for gender nonconforming children to lead desirable school lives.

A man, who came out as gay when he was a high school student, said during an interview that his teachers had told him his admission broke the harmony of the school, according to the report. A physical education teacher told him other students think what he did was a joke and that “by even standing next to you, people will think I’m gay too,” the report noted.

An 18-year-old lesbian in Nagoya, who has not come out, said she was shocked at the age of 16 when a home economics teacher told female students that their responsibility in life is to get married to a man and have children. “I got really upset during the lesson and I started to panic. I couldn’t breathe. I started crying.”

Meanwhile, a transgender student was told by his teachers his sense of discomfort as a girl is a temporary thing and that he would grow out of it — comments, he said, made him deeply sad because he had “so much respect for the teachers but they knew nothing about me,” the report said. According to a lawyer interviewed by Human Rights Watch, several schools allow transgender students to wear uniforms and have access to lavatories and school activities in accordance with their gender identity. But “such approaches by schools appear to be the exception rather than the norm,” the group said.

Many transgender students are at odds with their sense of self and hence feel humiliated when they are required to use toilets and lockers that do not correspond to their gender identity. Since they are forced into compliance, “their rights to receive equal education, including access to toilets and dressing rooms in accordance with their gender identity, are denied,” Doi said.

LGBT teachers must also run the gauntlet. Interviewees said they remain reluctant to come out at school, not because of fears of losing their jobs but because of concerns of losing the respect of their students and peers, the report said. “As a result, LGBT students have no adult role models whom they know to be LGBT, increasing their sense of isolation,” it added.

According to a separate survey mentioned in the report of nearly 6,000 teachers in Japan from kindergarten through high school levels, around 70 percent said LGBT issues should be included in the curriculum. However, less than 14 percent have experiences of discussing it in classrooms. According to the survey, just 8 percent of respondents said they learned about sexuality during their teacher training, and only nine percent about transgender issues, while more than 60 percent said they want to receive sexual diversity training, if it exists.

Given these findings, Doi said, “All teachers need to be trained so they can properly deal with sexual minority students, based on an assumption that there are LGBT students in their classrooms.” Doi, on the other hand, welcomes some steps initiated by the education ministry, which, for example, created booklets about sexual minority children for teachers and other school employees with the aim of improving the environment for them at school. The booklet noted, “It is possible that gender identity and sexual orientation are touched upon as part of human rights education.” In keeping with the promising move, “the government should use the current 2016 curriculum revision process as an opportunity to make concrete progress toward protecting all students,” Doi said.

An education ministry official who was contacted for this article, said while the government is aware of HRW’s proposal, it has no comment on the situation at this time. Human rights issues of sexual minorities have gradually drawn public attention in Japan, with some local governments starting to issue certificates recognizing same-sex partnership as being equivalent to marriage.

Source: Kyodo via Japan Today

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:20 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8390
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
For Japan’s ‘stranded singles’, virtual love beats the real thing
By Tracy McVeigh
20 November 2016

Japan’s apparently waning interest in true love is creating not just a marriage crisis but a relationship crisis, leading young people to forgo finding a partner and resort to falling for fictional characters in online and video games.

New figures show that more than 70% of unmarried Japanese men and 75% of women have never had any sexual experience by the time they reach 20, though that drops to almost 50% for each gender by the time they reach 25. According to Professor Masahiro Yamada, a sociologist at Chuo University in Tokyo, who has coined the phrase “stranded singles” for the phenomenon, the rise in virginity rates is matched by a rise in the lack of interest in having any kind of “real” relationship.

Recent research by the Japanese government showed that about 30% of single women and 15% of single men aged between 20 and 29 admitted to having fallen in love with a meme or character in a game – higher than the 24% of those women and 11% of men who admitted to falling in love with a pop star or actor.

The development of the multimillion-pound virtual romance industry in Japan reflects the existence of a growing number of people who don’t have a real-life partner, said Yamada. There is even a slang term, “moe”, for those who fall in love with fictional computer characters, while dating sims allow users to adjust the mood and character of online partners and are aimed at women as much as men. A whole subculture, including hotel rooms where a guest can take their console partner for a romantic break, has been springing up in Japan over the past six or seven years.

But Yamada says this is only a small part of the problem, which has its roots in traditional culture. Young people want conventional marriage and will wait for it. They don’t want to cohabit or have children outside marriage – Japan has the lowest rate of babies born outside marriage in the world at 2.2%, compared with Britain’s 47%.

Yamada labels as the “parasitics” those young people forced for economic reasons to live at home with their parents, and says that the phenomenon explains this year’s population fall in Japan as the birthrate drops. “Children are not likely to be born if men and women fail to bond in couples. Not just marriage but even the formation of couples has weakened in modern Japan. For daughters in particular, the family home is a place where they can wait under their parents’ wing until an ideal marriage partner comes along,” he added. “Instead of having to get hooked up with a man whose income is unstable, they can adopt a strategy of remaining at home in the expectation that sooner or later they will meet a man with sufficient income for a marriage partner. This is probably one reason why young Japanese are not very sexually active.

“Of course, a certain percentage of the daughters eventually meet and marry men with good income prospects. But most daughters end up staying with their parents. Sons who do not enjoy income stability also opt to remain in the family home. They, too, can be expected to get married and move out if their wages rise enough, or if they come across a woman who thinks their income is sufficient. But this is not the way life ordinarily turns out. As a result, the number of sons who continue to live with parents is on the rise.”

Yamada said there was now an expectation gap, with many young people giving up hope in the real world and turning to their computer world, where they could control their “lives”.

Professor Adrian Favell, a sociologist at the University of Leeds, who recently shared a speaking stage with Yamada in London, cautioned against the idea of a dysfunctional generation in Japan, saying that the west liked to exaggerate the “oddness” of young Japanese people. He said that a declining population was not necessarily “bad news”. “Is it unique to Japan for young people to obsess over pop, film stars, and the rest? Or to ‘fall in love’ on the internet? I don’t think so,” he said.

Source: The Observer UK

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:23 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8390
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Japan's silver-tongued Lotharios sell dreams to lonely women
By Alastair Himmer
21 February 2017

Cigarette smoke hangs thick in the air of a Tokyo nightspot as Aki Nitta sips champagne with a trio of sweet-talking Lotharios peddling fake love at premium rates.

In a country which has lost its mojo, many wealthy Japanese women spend eye-watering sums on male hosts in return for an evening of sweet talk, flirting -- and often sex. "I want my heart to flutter," Nitta told AFP at a popular club in the Kabukicho red-light district lined with chrome and mirrors. "Japanese men aren't very attentive and don't show their feelings, but hosts treat you like a princess. I want to be pampered and I don't care how much it costs," she adds.

The 27-year-old businesswoman from Nagoya spends around $10,000 a month on the object of her desire -- a faintly androgynous beau with bleached hair and a boyish grin. But some big-spenders splurge over $100,000 in a single night to have their egos stroked by smooth-talking rental Romeos who themselves can earn five times that amount in a good month.

There are a growing number of wealthy and successful Japanese women that have become frustrated with traditional dating and instead prefer to focus their romantic energies somewhere they are guaranteed to be treated well. "I'm paying for time, rather than men," explained Nitta. "Time is more important to me so I want to live for now, without any regrets."

Many women -- ranging from 20-somethings to those in their sixties -- lavish expensive gifts on their favourite hosts, buying them diamond watches, luxury cars, even apartments. "When I was 20 a customer bought me a Porsche," said former host Sho Takami, who owns a chain of clubs and likens a host's role to that of a psychiatrist, with benefits. "It's a 24-hour job," insisted the 43-year-old after arriving for work in a chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce.

"Our real work starts after hours -- going for drinks with customers, crawling into bed at 9am, meeting another one for lunch," added Takami, who is set to open a host club in Las Vegas next year. "It's important the customer believes there's a chance of love. After all that's how you get her to come to the club and spend money," Takami explained.

Host clubs are a $10 billion industry in Japan with some 800 venues nationwide. Around 260 of those are located in Tokyo, most squeezed into Kabukicho's narrow streets where flickering neon signs display the air-brushed faces of hosts outside clubs with names such as Romeo, Gatsby and Avalon.

Hosts have been compared to male geishas and Takami believes the culture, which began in the early 1970s, empowers women. "A host's job is to support a lady's heart," he said. "We're here to encourage women's social advancement. It used to be considered a bit vulgar to party with hosts. But times have changed. These days being able to let your hair down at a host club is a mark of status or success," he added.

Japan's hosts, denizens of the night instantly recognisable by their spray tans, crimped long hair and tight-fitting suits, are often accused of preying on women's emotions. "The customers are buying affection," shrugged ex-host Ken Ichijo on the terrace of his penthouse flat. "We're selling them dreams, so you lie about loving them in return for serious money," added the 38-year-old club manager, freshly blow-dried and shirt open to reveal a medallion. "That leaves a bad taste for some people who think we're just ripping girls off."

Ichijo argues that it is simply a case of supply and demand. "Hosts exist to fill a void in someone's life," he said. "In this business, the host is the product. We pamper to a woman's every need -- listen to her problems, tell her she's beautiful, act out her fantasies."

With harsher restrictions on opening hours, regular police checks and far less 'yakuza' gangster involvement, the host business has cleaned up its shady image in recent years. But the promise of sex is still dangled as bait in a cutthroat industry, admits Ichijo, whose plush apartment screams bling. "Sex is not necessarily part of a host club's service," he said. "But it is part of trying to satisfy the customer's needs."

Japan's shrinking birthrate has been blamed in part on a growing social trend known as 'herbivore men' -- those who shun carnal pleasures and machismo in favour of the quiet life. But libidos rage among the coiffured gigolos at the Top Dandy club, where sex worker Megumi Suzuki is a regular.

"Hosts are charming and they understand a woman's feelings," purred the 27-year-old as a snake-hipped host in leather pants and winklepicker shoes lit her cigarette. "I come here to blow off steam. The men are like sparkly things -- I could come every day and never tire of them."

Source: Yahoo! AFP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 6:56 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8390
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
LGBT politicians in Japan seek to promote awareness, secure rights
26 July 2017

Japan is the only G7 nation that does not recognize same-sex marriage or civil unions. With the 2020 Olympics looming - and international pressure mounting - five openly LGBT politicians have formed a group to promote issues from the local level.

Tokyo (dpa) – Kunihiro Maeda, one of Japan's few openly gay politicians, recalls waiting outside an intensive-care unit 15 years ago, not knowing whether his long-time partner was still alive after being rushed to hospital.

Maeda was only allowed to see his partner after his partner's parents arrived and told a doctor that Maeda was a family member. "Being a housemate does not enable you to be by your partner's bedside when he dies," said Maeda, 51, who has been an assembly member for Tokyo's Bunkyo ward for 18 years.

Maeda suffered a further indignity when he was not allowed to sit with other family members at his partner's funeral. "Even in an emergency, LGBT people are not guaranteed what heterosexuals take for granted," said Maeda, using the initials for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender.

Maeda, who is serving his fifth term, came out as gay in early July, when he and four other openly LGBT assembly members held a news conference announcing the establishment of Japan's first group of assembly members working to promote LGBT issues. They want to bring change to Japanese society, arguing that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government has done very little. The five are the country's only openly LGBT assembly members. Japan counts no openly LGBT members in its national parliament. (Kanako Otsuji served as an openly lesbian parliament member in 2013.)

Japan is the only G7 nation that does not allow same-sex marriage or civil unions. The launch of the new group came on the heels of the German Parliament's approval of marriage equality. Japan also has a history of homophobic comments by public figures. In 2010, then-Tokyo governor Shintaro Ishihara caused an international uproar when he said lesbians and gay men were "deficient somehow. It may be attributed to something genetic. I feel sorry for them being a minority."

Amnesty International has urged Japan, which is set to host the 2020 Olympics, to immediately end discrimination based on sexual orientation, as it violates the Olympic charter.

Unlike in the West, in Japan there are very few openly LGBT actors and actresses, and very few Japanese athletes who come out of the closet. Some say this contributes to a lack of awareness of gender and sexual diversity in the country. Some 7.6 per cent of people polled in Japan think of themselves as LGBT, according to a 2015 survey conducted by Dentsu, Japan's largest advertising agency. "It's very important to establish a network with other LGBT people and allies," said Taiga Ishikawa, who became one of Japan's first two openly gay male politicians in 2011.

Ishikawa, a 43-year-old assembly member for Toshima ward in Tokyo, learned the lesson the hard way. He did not meet other gay people until he was 25 years old, though he grew up in a cosmopolitan city. Ishikawa and his friends have worked together with LGBT communities in Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea.

Tomoya Hosoda, a 25-year-old transgender assembly member in the city of Iruma, said some local officials wrongly believed there were no LGBT people in Iruma, north of Tokyo. "I had no role models and spent a lot of time worrying about how to live my life," he said. "I decided to run for office as I did not want any other citizens of Iruma to go through what I had to go through."

A growing number of assembly members have expressed interest in working on LGBT issues since November 2015, when Tokyo's Shibuya and Setagaya wards started to issue certificates recognizing same-sex partnerships, said Aya Kamikawa, an openly transgender assembly member in Setagaya. That is one reason the five assembly members launched their group, Kamikawa said. In Setagaya, the number of same-sex couples who have received such a certificate grew to 50 in April, she said.

Other areas have followed suit. In June, Sapporo City became the sixth municipality in Japan to approve same-sex unions. That certificate proves "the existence of same-sex couples," Maeda said. "That has made them no longer invisible."

Source: dpa

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 139 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group