TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Mon Jun 25, 2018 7:38 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 72 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 1:08 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Number of sex workers increases despite law revision
By Claire Lee
30 September 2014

Image
A red-light district in Seoul (Yonhap)

This year marks the 10th anniversary of South Korea’s establishment of its antiprostitution law, which criminalizes the buying and selling of sex.

In spite of the special law, however, the number of female sex workers in South Korea increased 3.8 percent from 2010 to 2013, according to the latest report released by the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family.

The number of women working in the sex trade stood at 5,103 in 2013, up from 4,917 in 2010. Almost 80 percent of these women were in their 20s and 30s, according to the report. For the report, researchers interviewed a total of 15 female sex workers about their experiences.

Among them, 86.6 percent said their parents had gotten divorced and they had grown up in broken homes, while 13.4 percent said they had suffered from poverty and domestic abuse before working in the sex industry. Meanwhile, 60 percent of the women said they became involved in prostitution as teenagers after running away from home. Twelve of the 15 interviewed women either did not attend or did not finish high school. Three of them enrolled in postsecondary education but never graduated.

The study also found that among 2,180 men who illegally bought sex, the largest number ― 26.3 percent ― visited massage parlors. The second and third most-visited places of prostitution were red-light districts with more than 10 brothels in operation, and bars that offer illegal sexual services. Among 1,200 Korean men surveyed for the study, 56.7 percent said they had bought sex at least once in their lives, while 27.2 percent said they had done so in the past year. More than 70 percent of men who paid for sex last year were in their 30s and 40s.

“We also discovered that those who committed the crime more than 10 times consisted of both married men and singles,” said the Gender Equality Ministry in a statement. “Based on these findings, we have concluded that the argument that prostitution is necessary for men who are single, as they have no outlet for their sexual desire, is not valid.”

Only 57.7 percent of those who paid for sex were aware of the antiprostitution law, while 93.1 percent of those who did not commit the crime understood that the act of buying and selling sex was illegal. Upon learning about the law, 78.3 percent of those who had bought sex said they had decided not to repeat their crimes, while only 70.3 percent of them said the same back in 2010.

In general, more Koreans have become aware of the law, at 93.1 percent last year versus 69.8 percent in 2009, according to the report. “We will continue to offer education programs (about the illegality of the sex trade) and continue with our campaign against the sex trade,” said Gender Equality Minister Kim Hee-jung. “The sex trade involves the denial of human dignity and therefore it must stop. We will try our best to enforce the ethical principle that humans cannot be bought and sold.”

Source: Korea Herald.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 2:47 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Seoul mayor endorses same-sex marriage
By Claire Lee
13 October 2014

Seoul mayor Park Won-soon told a U.S. newspaper that he personally supports same-sex marriage and would like to see South Korea being the first country in Asia to legalize it, during his recent visit to San Francisco.

With his comments, Park has become one of the first mainstream South Korean politicians to openly support LGBT rights, following the current Gender-Equality Minister Kim Hee-jung. Gay marriage is opposed by political conservatives and Christians, as well as a majority of the public here.

“I personally agree with the rights of homosexuals,” Park was quoted as saying by San Francisco Examiner, a Bay-area daily, in its story published online on Sunday. “But the Protestant churches are very powerful in Korea. It isn’t easy for politicians. It’s in the hands of activists to expand the universal concept of human rights to include homosexuals. Once they persuade the people, the politicians will follow. It’s in process now.”

The former lawyer and human rights activist, who is widely considered one of the leading contenders for South Korea’s next presidency, also told the U.S. daily that he hopes to see his nation being the first in Asia to legalize gay marriage. “Many homosexual couples in Korea are already together,” he told the paper. “They are not legally accepted yet, but I believe the Korean constitution allows it. We are guaranteed the right to the pursuit of happiness. Of course, there may be different interpretations to what that pursuit means.”

The endorsement, however, may work against him in his political career ― especially if he plans to run for the 2016 presidential election ― as homosexuality still remains largely taboo in South Korea, where almost 30 percent of the population is Christian. According to a study last year jointly conducted by a local daily and Asan Institute for Policy Studies, 78.5 percent of 1,500 Koreans said they objected to homosexuality. Only 21.5 percent of the participants said they did not feel “uncomfortable” with it. While 92.4 percent of the participants in their 60s said they are against homosexuality, 57.5 percent in their 20s said the same.

In June, an annual queer parade in Seoul, one of the largest LGBT events in Asia, was disrupted by hundreds of Christians who knelt on the street and prayed in protest. Just about a week before the day of the event, Seoul’s Seodaemun-gu district revoked the permission that had previously been given to the festival organizers, after reportedly receiving complaints from conservative Christian groups. The event, which celebrated its 15th edition, was held regardless, in spite of the district office’s disapproval.

Source: Korea Herald.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2014 7:14 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
1 in 10 foreign female workers sexually harassed in South Korea
By Claire Lee
24 October 2014

One in 10 of female migrant workers were sexually harassed while working in South Korea last year, according to Rep. Lee Jasmine’s office.

According to Lee, who is the first non-ethnic Korean and naturalized citizen to become a lawmaker in South Korea, 10.7 percent of the female workers from foreign countries experienced sexual harassment in South Korea last year.

Among them, 35.5 percent were raped, 35.5 percent had to endure unwanted physical contact, and 29 percent were inappropriately touched while being forced to drink alcohol. Meanwhile, 12.9 percent said they were asked to provide sex for money. Up to 88.9 percent of the victims said employers or those in managerial positions abused them, and 16.7 percent said they were harassed by fellow migrant workers from the same country of origin.

Lee pointed out that the current law does not require local shelters or service centers for sexual harassment victims to have a special program designed specifically for migrant workers, who are often faced with unique linguistic and legal challenges. “The Ministry of Gender Equality and Family must come up with measures to protect and support female migrant workers who have been sexually harassed at workplaces here,” she said.

Source: Korea Herald.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
South Korean court abolishes law criminalizing adultery
By Kim Tong-Hyung
26 February 2015

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- A South Korean court on Thursday abolished a 62-year-old law that criminalized extramarital affairs, and the stock price of a prominent condom maker immediately shot up 15 percent.

The Constitutional Court's ruling that the law suppressed personal freedoms could affect many of the more than 5,400 people who have been charged with adultery since 2008, when the court earlier upheld the legislation, according to court law. Any current charges against those people could be thrown out and those who have received guilty verdicts will be eligible for retrials, according to a court official who declined to be named, citing office rules.

Under the law, having sex with a married person who is not your spouse was punishable by up to two years in prison. Nearly 53,000 South Koreans have been indicted on adultery charges since 1985, but prison terms have been rare.

The stock price of South Korean condom maker Unidus Corp. shot up after the court ruling, surging by the daily limit of 15 percent on South Korea's Kosdaq market.

Debate over the adultery ban, which has been part of South Korea's criminal law since 1953, intensified in recent years as fast-changing social trends challenged traditional values. Supporters of the law said it promoted monogamy and kept families intact, while opponents argued that the government had no right to interfere in people's private lives and sexual affairs.

The court was acting on 17 complaints submitted from 2009 to 2014 by people who had been charged under the law. Seven judges in the court, which rules on the constitutionality of laws, supported the ruling, while two dissented, the court said. The support of six judges is needed to abolish a law.

The law "excessively restricts citizens' basic rights, such as the right to determine sexual affairs," the court said, explaining that the legislation no longer contributed to overall public interest.

It was the fifth time the court had reviewed the adultery ban since 1990. In October 2008, five of the judges said the law was unconstitutional.

Legal experts say the adultery ban had lost much of its effect because people increasingly settled marriage disputes in civil courts. Adultery could be prosecuted only on a complaint made by a spouse who had filed for divorce. The case immediately ended if the plaintiff dropped the charge, which was common when financial settlements were reached.

"Recently, it was extremely rare for a person to serve a prison term for adultery," said Lim Ji-bong, a law professor at Sogang University in Seoul. "The number of indictments has decreased as charges are frequently dropped."

South Korea, along with Taiwan, had been a rare non-Muslim nation to criminalize adultery, according to Park So-hyun, an official at the Korea Legal Aid Center for Family Relations, a government-funded counseling office.

Many legal experts had predicted that the court would abolish the adultery ban, but the decision was still controversial in a country that remains greatly influenced by a conservative Confucian heritage, despite decades of Western influence.

Park Dae Chul, a lawmaker for the conservative ruling party, Saenuri, said it respects the court's decision but that the country needs to strengthen its efforts to protect marriage and the family system.

Lawmaker Yoo Eun Hye of the liberal opposition New Politics Alliance for Democracy said the decision reflected social changes.

Last year the government banned access to Ashley Madison, a dating website for people who want to cheat on their partners, over concerns that the service could encourage adultery. The Korea Communications Standards Commission, the country's Internet censorship body, said it has not decided whether to lift the ban on the website.

Source: Yahoo! AP

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2015 11:15 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8360
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Expat kicked out of bar in Seoul for being gay
By Darren Wee
26 March 2015

An expat in South Korea has claimed he was kicked out of a bar in Seoul for being gay.

Eric Michael said he was asked to leave Zen Bar in Hongdae area on Sunday (22 March) after he was kissed by a male friend. 'I know I was singled out because I am gay, and that’s the simple fact,' he told the Korean Observer.

Eric said he was dancing with a group of friends when one, another gay man, 'snuck a gentle kiss in on my neck area.' ‘As I was dancing and spontaneously lip-syncing to Taylor Swift’s Shake it Off, a security guard came directly toward me, flashed his flashlight on me and said “I need to talk to you!” and asked me to come outside,' he said. ‘We went outside to the front and his first question to me was ‘Are you gay?’ – to which I didn’t even respond.’

The bouncer asked the question again, then made an X sign with his arms and said, 'No gays, no gays.' The bar manager said he was unaware of the incident but added that a customer had presumably complained about Eric.

South Korea is a socially conservative country. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 57% of residents believed that homosexuality was 'morally unacceptable.'

Source: GayStarNews

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 1:46 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Expat takes on Seoul mayor over gay rights
10 March 2015
By Darren Wee

Image
Simon Hunter-Williams

A British expat took on the mayor of Seoul last Friday (6 March) over rights for gay couples.

It was a bold move by Simon Hunter-Williams in a country where homosexuality remains taboo. 'How can I stay in Korea with the man I love? Where are my rights please?' he asked. 'I also fell in love with a Korean like many people. The only difficulty is the person I fell in love with is a man.'

The English professor, who has lived in Korea for five years, was applauded by the more than 100 mostly Europeans at the town hall meeting, but the MC did not translate his comments into Korean as he did for all the others. Mayor Park Won-soon did address his concerns, but just to say LGBTI rights was a 'very sensitive topic in Korea.'

Before the meeting, Hunter-Williams slipped Park a note, identifying himself as a gay man who hopes to marry and start a family with his Korean partner. 'The mayor has my email and cell phone number and is yet to prove himself,' he told Gay Star News. In October, Park said he hoped South Korea would be the first country in Asia to legalize gay marriage but u-turned after a Christian backlash.

Hunter-Williams made the direct appeal to the mayor after making several phone calls to the immigration office about applying for a partner visa. 'The first officer laughed at me. The second said it was illegal and the third, the same,' he said. One officer suggested Hunter-Williams move to Shanghai where the UK embassy is allowed marry gay British nationals and their partners. 'I then went to the Human Rights Office who said this wasn't a human rights issue and that Korea doesn't have human rights,' he said.

Hunter-Williams sent a letter to President Park Geun-hye on Monday (9 March) calling on her to legalize gay marriage and visa. 'Obviously we both love Korea and want to marry in Korea, but it's a country where an interesting brand of Christianity seems able to manipulate government,' he said. 'Time will tell. Anyone who follows Korean politics knows how messy it is.'

Watch Hunter-Williams take on Mayor Park below:



Source: GayStarNews.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2015 5:27 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Woman charged with rape for first time in Korea
by Claire Lee
3 April 2015

A woman in her 40s has been indicted on charges of attempting to rape a man after drugging him, becoming the first woman to be charged for such offences in Korean history.

Up until June 2013, Korean law did not acknowledge women as rapists and therefore it was impossible for male victims to file complaints to police. This is the first time a woman has been arrested on charges of sexually abusing a man.

According to the Supreme Prosecutors’ Office in Seoul, the woman, who is only identified with her surname Jeon, has been charged of attempting to rape her boyfriend, who had been married to another woman at the time, after drugging him at her place last year. She is also charged of attacking him with a blunt instrument as the man tried to escape her place after he woke up from sleep.

Source: Korea Herald via Asia Newsnet.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 5:43 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Thousands march in Seoul for S. Korea's gay pride parade
June 28, 2015

image
A performer gestures from a float during a gay pride parade as part of the 'Korea Queer Festival' in Seoul on June 28, 2015 (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

Thousands marched through central Seoul Sunday in what organisers described as South Korea's biggest annual gay pride parade, with many celebrating the US Supreme Court's historic decision allowing same-sex couples nationwide to wed.

On the other side of police barriers around Seoul Plaza, thousands of Christian activists waved banners and chanted slogans at those taking part, condemning what they called an attempt to turn the city into "Sodom and Gomorrah". Some held up banners reading "Hell is upon you! Repent!" towards the marchers, who responded by cheering and waving rainbow flags at them.

Police estimated more than 6,000 people took part in the hour-long parade in the heart of the capital to mark the finale of the annual Korea Queer Festival that started on June 9. Organisers estimated the number of participants -- gay, lesbian and bisexual and transgender people -- at more than 20,000, which they described as the largest turnout for the event.

Homosexuality is not illegal in South Korea. But gay and transgender people live largely under the radar in a country that remains deeply conservative about matters of sexual identity and where many still regard homosexuality as a foreign phenomenon.

image
In a photo taken on June 7, 2014 members of the LGBT community take part in a Gay Pride parade in Seoul (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

Gay rights activists say some progress has been made in recent years, and Friday's US Supreme Court decision cheered those taking part in the event. Decorated trucks carrying dancers and banners reading "Marriage Equality" and "Solidarity under the Rainbow" drove across the city centre, followed by cheering crowds. Many waved rainbow-coloured banners reading "Some people are gay. That's okay", while clapping, dancing and singing along with songs including Lady Gaga's "Born This Way".

"What happened in the US was incredible... I hope that I and my girlfriend will be able to celebrate the same here one day," said Suzy Lee, one of the participants. "But we know it will take many, many years here in the South," the 28-year-old told AFP.

image
In a photo taken on June 9, 2015 a member of a conservative Christian group holds a bible as he shouts slogans during a protest against the opening ceremony of the 'Queer Korea' gay pride festival in Seoul (AFP Photo/Yelim Lee)

The annual parade -- which began in 2000 -- has in recent years attracted a growing number of participants, as well as increasing opposition from conservative Christian groups. Previous parades were often marred by angry protests by Christians, who threw water bottles at marchers and tried to block their route by lying down in the street. Concerns over public safety and potential clashes prompted police to ban the planned parade last month. A Seoul court later overturned the ban.

Sunday's event was held under heavy security involving thousands of police, with police barriers ringing the vast 1.3-hectare (3.2 acre) Seoul Plaza where people assembled for the parade. Many protesters played hymns and shouted slogans through loudspeakers in an apparent attempt to drown out the cultural performances in the plaza before and after the parade. "All of us have come here today to fight against these voices of hatred towards us," Kang Myeong-Jin, chief of the parade organising committee, told the marchers. "It has been a long and tough road... but I'm very happy that the parade was held successfully," he said.

Christian activists this year tried in advance to block the event by filing competing applications for the same dates and venues. Major Protestant church groups, including the Christian Council of Korea (CCK), have urged Seoul city council to ban the parade, arguing that it encourages homosexuality and will contribute to the spread of AIDS. Bodies like the CCK -- an alliance of churches that claims to represent around 12 million Christians -- wield great social and political influence in the country.

Source: Yahoo! AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 6:06 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8360
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Activist couple test gay rights barriers in conservative Korea
28 July 2015

Seoul (AFP) - Growing up as a young gay man in South Korea in the 1970s and 80s, film director Kim Jho Gwang-Soo was warned that his homosexual "disease" would condemn him to a life of loveless, insatiable promiscuity.

"From an early age, my dream was to become a director, but instead of making movies I was apparently going to waste all my time and energy looking for sexual partners," Kim said. Now 50, Kim looks back on such absurdities with a degree of wry, detached humour, but for a 15-year-old realising his true sexuality in the late '70s, South Korea could be a grim place.

"The gay community didn't really begin to emerge here until the mid-1990s, so there was a 15-year period there when things were pretty dark. It was a difficult time," he said. But times have changed.

Buoyed by the US Supreme Court's recent landmark decision on same sex marriage, the gay rights movement in South Korea is currently riding something of a mini-wave in terms of its public profile and popular support. Last month's gay pride parade was the largest ever, with thousands marching through central Seoul despite vocal protests by conservative Christian groups. And earlier this month, Kim and his long-time partner Kim Seung-Hwan decided to take things a step further, and went to court to demand legal status as a married couple. The two men had held an outdoor wedding ceremony in Seoul in September 2013 and submitted their marriage registration form to their local authority -- only for it to be rejected.

While homosexuality is not illegal in South Korea, same-sex marriage is not recognised.

Making a start

"We know the law won't change right away, but we need to make a start -- to get the issue in front of the public," Kim said in an interview in the Seoul apartment he shares with his partner. The 20-year age difference between the two men -- Kim Seung-Hwan is 30 -- meant their experiences of growing up gay in South Korea were very different -- or, as the elder Kim put it, it was "way easier for him".

After a rural childhood, Kim Seung-Hwan graduated high school in 2004 and came to Seoul, where the gay community was by then firmly established. "It was a revelation after all the horror stories I had been fed," he recalled.

But even among gay activists at the time, there was an unspoken rule of anonymity and very few were open about their sexual orientation in the wider community, or in the workplace. "There was a real fear of the career consequences," the younger Kim said. "So most activists adopted nicknames, and it wasn't the done thing to ask people about their real names, ages or addresses."

The same concerns stalked Kim Jho Gwang-Soo as he started building what would prove to be a fruitful career as a film producer and director.

From denial to pride

In 2001, during a press conference for his movie "Wanee and Junah," a journalist asked if an obviously gay character in the movie was autobiographical. At the time, the filmmaker had not yet publicly come out as gay. "I denied it. Several times in fact," Kim said. "It was only the second film I had produced, and I just wasn't confident enough to get over the anxiety that it would hurt my career."

But the secrecy grated and by 2006 Kim was open about his sexuality as he produced his sixth movie, "No Regrets" -- widely seen as South Korea's first explicitly gay feature. He remains one of just a small handful of openly gay celebrities in a still deeply conservative country where most gay and transgender people choose to remain under the radar.

The two Kims are certainly the most high-profile gay couple in South Korea and the lawsuit they filed over their marriage license is the first of its kind. Their lawyer, Ryu Min-Hee, said she was pushing for the recognition of precedent in existing rulings where courts have struck down discriminatory family law provisions using the constitution's equal protection clause. "We argue that the same clause can be applied in this case, which is discriminatory against a same-sex couple," Ryu said.

Legal analysts say a suit with such potentially profound consequences is unlikely to be granted by a district court, but suggest a sympathetic judge could insert some encouraging wording in his ruling that might provide support for future cases or appeals.

US influence

Ryu believes last month's US Supreme Court ruling legalising same-sex marriage was a watershed moment, given the level of US influence -- social, cultural and political -- over South Korea. Ironically, the most pro-US South Koreans also tend to be social conservatives, cut from the same cloth as the Christian groups who are the most vocal opponents of gay rights.

Some of those groups, who had publicly prayed for the safe recovery of US Ambassador Mark Lippert after a knife attack in Seoul in March, were dismayed by the ambassador's attendance at -- and support for -- the gay pride march last month. "The Supreme Court decision was great timing for us, but this case isn't just about marriage rights," Ryu said. "LGBT people in South Korea are discriminated against in law and life and we want to share this story with the Korean public," she added. "That's our goal."

Source: Yahoo! AFP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2016 4:07 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8360
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Prostitution allegations investigated against Samsung boss
By TONG-HYUNG KIM
27 July 2016

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- South Korean prosecutors said Wednesday that they have started investigating allegations that ailing Samsung Group chairman Lee Kun-hee bought sex from prostitutes several times between 2011 and 2013.

An official from the Seoul Central District Prosecutors' Office said the case is being handled by a division specializing in crimes against women and children. He refused to be named, citing office rules. The allegations were raised last week after internet news outlet Newstapa released footage purportedly showing a man who appeared to be Lee interacting with women who might have been prostitutes on several occasions.

Newstapa didn't reveal how it obtained the videos, but said they were filmed secretly by at least one of the women who allegedly served Lee. It also reported that the creators of the videos likely tried to use them to blackmail Lee or the Samsung Group before they were leaked to journalists. Samsung said Wednesday that it had no comment on what it described as a "personal matter" of Lee.

Selling or buying sex is a crime punishable by up to a year in prison or a fine of 3 million won ($2,600) in South Korea. Lee, 74, credited by some for his role in helping South Korea's largest business group grow into a global technology giant, has been hospitalized since suffering a heart attack in May 2014 and is reportedly in a coma.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 1:59 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8360
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
After sex video, South Korea accused of targeting gay soldiers
By KIM TONG-HYUNG
21 April 2017

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- A watchdog group says South Korea's army is hunting down and prosecuting gay servicemen after a video of two male soldiers having sex was posted on the internet earlier this year, stoking fear in an already persecuted minority group.

Military investigators looking into the case have threatened soldiers to out their gay peers, confiscated cellphones to check communication records, and even used dating apps to dupe soldiers into revealing their sexual identity, said Taehoon Lim, the head of the Military Human Rights Center for Korea, which tracks down abuses in the armed forces.

South Korea's army says it's conducting a proper criminal investigation into soldiers allegedly involved with filming and uploading the video, which is a violation of the country's communications laws and a military penal code that makes homosexual activity punishable by up to two years in prison. The army has denied allegations that investigators are using the case to embark on a broader mission to weed out gay soldiers.

"Military investigators used the information they gained from the investigation on the sex video to track down other gay soldiers in the army, starting by forcing the suspects to identify who they had sex with and then widening their search from there," said Lim, who said a soldier tipped his group off about the alleged crackdown.

In conservative South Korea, gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people are harshly stigmatized and struggle to be politically visible, while a powerful Christian lobby immobilizes politicians seeking to pass anti-discrimination laws. That stigma is amplified in the military, where most able-bodied South Korean men are required to serve about two years as the country maintains a large force in the face of potential conflict with North Korea.

Gay men are not exempt from conscription but are banned from engaging in homosexual activity while serving, leading to an environment in which they serve without revealing their sexual identity for fear of discrimination and reprisals.

"South Korea's military doesn't exclude gay men from compulsory duty, but once they enter the military, they are seen as dangerous and treated as potential criminals, as the ongoing army investigation shows," said Han Ga-ram, an openly gay human rights lawyer. He said the investigation had "touched off fear in the LGBT community."

"Hate crimes against LGBT people are already a serious problem, and the government could make it worse by sending the wrong message by punishing gay men in the military," Han said.

The army doesn't reveal information about how often it pursues cases against gay soldiers, but Lim said in the five years before 2017 he knows of only two cases where soldiers were prosecuted for homosexual activity. Since the start of the year, more than 30 soldiers have come under investigation and one has been arrested, an army captain who did not know the soldiers involved, Lim said. "The soldiers who are being investigated had sex with their partners under mutual consent and not inside the barracks," Lim said. "The army has infringed on the realms of privacy and is falsely claiming that these soldiers committed wrongdoings."

Lim said the arrested captain had never met the soldier who uploaded the video and he was arrested for allegedly obstructing the investigation by delaying his appearance for questioning due to his lawyer's schedule. The captain's lawyer could not be reached for comment. Lim's group in 2014 uncovered the bullying death of a 21-year-old army conscript, a case that shocked the nation and led to calls for the Defense Ministry to take serious steps to reduce bullying and hazing in the military.

The army didn't provide details of its investigation into the video, including the number of soldiers being investigated or why the captain was arrested. It said in a statement that the investigation was proceeding legally and that the privacy of soldiers was being protected. The army also stressed that homosexual activity in the military is banned to allow soldiers to maintain "sound and healthy private lives." "The army will continue to deal with activities that disrupt the discipline of troops based on related laws," the army said in a statement.

South Korea's stance runs counter to that of the United States, which maintains bases in the country and is its largest ally. In 2011, the U.S. repealed its policy, known as don't ask, don't tell, which banned open homosexuality in the military. It now allows service members to reveal they are gay without fear of investigation or discharge.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Korea and sex
PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 8:22 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8360
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
South Korean military court convicts soldier over gay sex
By KIM TONG-HYUNG
24 May 2017

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- A South Korean military court on Wednesday sentenced an army captain to a suspended prison term for having sex with a fellow male soldier in a ruling human rights groups criticized as regressive and intimidating.

A lawyer for the captain said her client was being punished for having consensual sex with his partner in a private space. She said the captain was briefly treated at a hospital for shock following his conviction. "It's a ridiculous ruling," said lawyer Kim In-sook. She said the military penal code, which makes homosexual activity punishable by up to two years in prison, was unconstitutional because it tramples on basic human rights and dignity.

South Korea's military, which doesn't reveal how often it pursues cases against soldiers suspected of being gay, didn't immediately make a statement. Kim said it's unclear whether her client would appeal his six month prison sentence that was suspended by a year because he felt tormented by the legal process. He will be dishonorably discharged if the ruling stays.

The captain was arrested last month amid allegations by a watchdog that South Korea's military was hunting down and prosecuting gay servicemen. South Korea's army has denied such claims, saying it was conducting a criminal investigation of soldiers who posted a video on the internet of two male soldiers having sex earlier this year.

Lim Tae-hoon, who heads the Military Human Rights Center for Korea, which complained about the crackdown, said in an earlier interview with the Associated Press that neither the captain nor his partner had anything to do with the soldiers involved with the video leak. According to Lim, military investigators used the information gained from their inquiry into the video case to track down other gay soldiers. Investigators threatened soldiers to out their gay peers, confiscated cellphones to check communication records, and even used dating apps to dupe soldiers into revealing their sexual identity, Lim said.

Lim's group released a statement denouncing Wednesday's ruling, saying that it "turned the clock of history backward." "Sexual minorities who are always living in danger of being outed by others now must live in fear that they could be tracked down at any time and interrogated over their private lives," the group said.

Roseann Rife, East Asia research sirector at Amnesty International, called for the "unjust conviction" to be immediately overturned. In conservative South Korea, gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people are harshly stigmatized and struggle to be politically visible, while a powerful Christian lobby immobilizes politicians seeking to pass anti-discrimination laws. That stigma is amplified in the military, where most able-bodied South Korean men are required to serve about two years as the country maintains a large force in the face of potential conflict with North Korea.

Gay men are not exempt from conscription but are banned from engaging in homosexual activity while serving, leading to an environment in which they serve without revealing their sexual identity for fear of discrimination and reprisals.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 72 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group