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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 3:56 pm 
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Gays stage public action in Kazakhstan
by Rex Wockner
3 June 2010

Seven gay men staged a "flashmob" in Almaty, Kazakhstan, on May 17 in conjunction with IDAHO, the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia.

They gathered near the KazakhTelecom building and handed out flyers and released rainbow balloons into the sky. A report from the participants said other gay people watched the action unfold "from afar."

Source: PrideSource.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:13 am 
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No Sex Please, We're Kazakh
December 11, 2010
by Hugh Raiser

A group of self-appointed moral guardians descended on the main market in Kazakhstan's commercial capital, Almaty, this week in protest at the recent appearance in stalls of "Kazakh porn."

Kazakh newspaper Vremya reports that the Bolashak Movement's youth wing has declared war on smut and vowed to blast it out of existence. The group began their campaign on December 8 with the public destruction of 15 locally produced X-rated video disks and then marched on Almaty's central market to harangue hapless hawkers.

EurasiaNet has not yet seen any of these salacious flicks and cannot illuminate readers as to what Kazakh porn constitutes precisely. So we leave it to the head of the Bolashak's youth wing, Elnur Beysenbayev, to explain further:

    "Kazakh porn first went on sale earlier this year. … In a seven-minute video, filmed on a mobile phone camera, you can see three Kazakhs -- two guys and one girl. This does not reflect our nation's character -- Kazakh people are educated and aspire to something. I want to tell all these vendors not to sell these disks, and if anybody offers to sell you one, don't buy it!"

As Vremya explains, this campaign for moral probity could prove to be an uphill battle, however. The disks are for sale at around 350 spots around Almaty and demand is growing exponentially. And while prices for this licentious fare do appear to have risen in recent times, local punters are still willing to shell out up to 1,500 tenge ($10) per disk to see their kinfolk doing the dirty.

Addressing this point, a Vremya reporter wonders whether the Bolashak youth campaign is not just simply cheating their contemporaries out of some harmless fun, a suggestion to which Beysenbayev doesn't take kindly:

    "Oh, so what are we supposed to do? Say nothing?! … We must and will talk about this issue. We are not law enforcement agencies that can take action against those that distribute pornography [but] today we will appeal to Almaty authorities to find who made this video and appeared in it."

At this stage in the game, cleansing Almaty of its sexual excesses seems like a vain exercise, not that it stops people from trying. A group working along similar lines to Bolashak has dotted some of the city's walls with stenciled graffiti exhorting passersby not to resort to using the services of prostitutes -- a possibly well intended, but utterly fruitless effort.

Indeed, a visit to some of the city's most popular expat hangouts might be a better place to start waging that battle.

Source: Eurasianet.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 7:08 am 
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Some Kazakh motorists trumpet their love of sex
18 March 2011

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ALMATY, Kazakhstan (AP) - Traffic police in a southern Kazakhstan city have complained of a rising tide of motorists replacing their license plates with signs reading "I Love Sex."

Online news channel Mir reported Friday that one of them, a 19-year old motorist in Kyzyl-Orda, was fined $1,000 for pinning the provocative plate to his SUV. The station also showed police footage of another car bearing a more chaste plate honoring a woman: "I Love Aizat."

Former Soviet Kazakhstan is a largely Muslim nation, but social mores and attitudes toward sex tend to be somewhat relaxed, especially in cities. One youth group, however, has led campaigns to weed out locally produced porn films and has called for a ban on Valentine's Day.

Source: Breitbart.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 2:28 pm 
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Enraged by Homosexual Advance, Man Cuts Off Drinking Buddy's Penis
29 February 2012
By Peter Spinella

A 27-year-old in the Kazakh city of Aktobe is suspected of fatally stabbing his 50-year-old drinking buddy and cutting off his penis after the man proposed that they have sex.

The victim, whose body was discovered by his landlady, had multiple stab wounds to the back and his penis had been removed, a police official told Interfax-Kazakhstan on Wednesday.

The suspect, whose name has not been released, told investigators that while the two were drinking the older man proposed that they partake in pleasures of the flesh, a proposition that made him angry.

A criminal case has been opened under Kazakh Criminal Code Article 96: murder. The suspect is behind bars.

Source: The Moscow Times.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 7:49 am 
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Gay porn tops internet searches in anti-gay countries
13 March 2013
By Joe Morgan

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Many of the most homophobic countries in the world have searched for gay porn. Photo by Scott Nunn.

Some of the most homophobic countries in the world are really into gay porn, reveals porn search engine PornMD.

The company has published search data today (13 March) mapping porn habits across the globe – and it reveals in many of the worst countries to be LGBT, gay porn is as popular or more popular than straight erotica.

In Kenya, where you can be imprisoned for being gay for up to 14 years, the second most searched for kind of porn is ‘monster cock’.

‘South African gay porn’ is fourth on the list in Nigeria, where you can face death for being gay, and Ghana, where homosexuality is also illegal, seem to have no problem with ‘black lesbians’.

Libyans, who could face up to five years imprisonment for being gay, search for ‘Silver Daddy’ gay porn more than any other type.

In Iran, the list for gay searches goes ‘Daddy love’ at number four, with ‘Hairy’ and ‘Hotel businessman’ at five and six with just plain ‘Iranian’ last. The country gives the death penalty for homosexuality.

Mauritius has ‘spycam gay porn’ as their top search, as well as ‘gay tickling’ at number seven.

In Chile, nine out of 10 searches for erotica were for gay porn. And, in Hungary, the seventh and eighth searches were gay porn featuring ‘Grandpas’ and ‘Koreans’.

Kazakhstan’s top search was Russian gay porn, Lebanon likes looking for guys with ‘big legs’, and the Ukraine’s favorite is ‘Raincoat’ gay porn.

It seems gay people are forced to go underground due to a country’s homophobic attitudes or laws, with many turning to the internet to fulfill their urges. In countries with civil partnerships and marriage equality such as the United Kingdom, Spain and Sweden, gay men are far less likely to go online to get off. None of the top 10 searches in those countries were for gay porn.

Last month, a separate study revealed watching porn makes straight men more likely to support marriage equality.

Source: Gay Star News.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2014 6:38 am 
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Lawmaker calls for Kazakhstan to ban sex between women
17 January 2014
By Andrew Potts

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The Kazakh Parliament. Photo by Msykos

If Kazakhstani lawmaker Nurlan Abdirov gets his way his Central Asian nation will become one of the few in the world to ban sex between women alongside sex between men.

Lawmakers should strongly consider bringing people ‘to book’ for ‘lesbianism and other aspects of the sexual and gender sphere,’ Abdirov told a session of the lower house’s legal affairs committee, according to Tengri News. Abdirov said Kazakh lawmakers intended to organize ‘special themed sessions and round tables’ around the issue.

Homosexuality has been legal in Kazakhstan since 1998 but in recent years there has been a darkening mood towards LGBTI people in the majority Muslim nation.

In October of last year Bakhytbek Smagul, a deputy in the Parliament of Kazakhstan, called for homosexuality to be banned - claiming that gay men will undermine the country’s ability to defend itself. ‘I believe it necessary not only to enhance the article 11 of the Family Code [listing those who are not allowed to marry], but also to develop a draft law eradicating same-sex relations, and close the nightclubs everywhere,’ Smagul told Kazakhstan Prime Minister Serik Akhmetov during a plenary session in the Lower House. ‘Tell me, how will gay men be able to protect the borders of our country? How will they defend us? What will be their impact on the country’s demography?'

In August, Aldan Smaiyl, a member of the Lower House, filed a request for a Russian style ‘gay propaganda’ ban. ‘I asked to ban gay clubs, demonstrations and any and all of these disgusting relations,’ he said. ‘I received a reply that Kazakhstan had no such law.’

Source: GayStarNews.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:34 pm 
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Forthcoming trade ban on synthetic underwear has Russia's knickers in a twist
By Laura Mills
17 February 2014

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Women protest against the ban of synthetic underwear in Almaty, Kazakhstan on Sunday 16 February. AP Photo/Vladimir Tretyakov

MOSCOW (AP) -- A trade ban on lacy lingerie has Russian consumers and their neighbors with their knickers in a twist.

The ban will outlaw any underwear containing less than 6 percent cotton from being imported, made, or sold in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan. And it has struck a chord in societies where La Perla and Victoria's Secret are panty paradises compared to Soviet-era cotton underwear, which was often about as flattering and shapely as drapery.

On Sunday, 30 women protesters in Kazakhstan were arrested and thrown into police vans while wearing lace underwear on their heads and shouting "Freedom to panties!"

The ban in those three countries was first outlined in 2010 by the Eurasian Economic Commission, which regulates the customs union, and it won't go into effect until July 1. But a consumer outcry against it already is reaching a fever pitch.

Photographs comparing sexy modern underwear to outdated, Soviet goods began spreading on Facebook and Twitter on Sunday, as women and men alike railed against the prospective changes.

"As a rule, lacy underwear ... is literally snatched off the shelves," said Alisa Sapardiyeva, the manager of a lingerie store in Moscow, DD-Shop, as she flicked through her colorful wares. "If you take that away again, the buyer is going to be the one who suffers the most." According to the Russian Textile Businesses Union, more than $4 billion worth of underwear is sold in Russia annually, and 80 percent of the goods sold are foreign made. Analysts have estimated that 90 percent of products would disappear from shelves, if the ban goes into effect this summer as planned. The Eurasian Economic Commission declined to comment Monday, saying it was preparing to issue a statement about the underwear ban.

While consumer outrage may force customs union officials to compromise, many see the underwear ban as yet another example of the misguided economic policies that have become a trademark of many post-Soviet countries.

Sunday's panty protest in Kazakhstan followed a larger demonstration the day before against a 19 percent devaluation of the country's currency, the tenge.

Other people laughed off the panty ban, seeing it as yet another attempt to add regulations and controls to an already byzantine bureaucracy in the three countries. "I think (the girls)... will still have the opportunity to wear it (synthetic underwear) whether you can buy it in Russia or not," said 22-year-old Muscovite Trifon Gadzhikasimov, noting that most of his friends travel abroad regularly. "I think this is just another silly law that shows the ineffectiveness of our government."

Vitnija Saldava in Moscow contributed to this report.
Source: Yahoo! AP.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 7:02 pm 
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Kazakhstan: Gay club poster sparks controversy over gay kiss
28th August 2014
by Joseph Patrick McCormick

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The poster advertising Almaty gay club Studio 69 Photograph: Havas Worldwide Kazakhstan on Facebook

A poster for a gay club in Kazakhstan has sparked controversy for featuring two 19th Century cultural figures.

The advert for the gay club in Almaty, features Kazakh composer Kurmangazy Sagyrbayuly and Russian poet Alexander Pushkin engaged in a kiss.

The RFE reports that 20 activists filed a lawsuit earlier this week against the advertising agency which created the poster. The lawsuit said the advert “insults both Kazakhs and Russians.” Police have also registered an official complaint, and a descendent of Kurmangazy has also threatened to sue the agency for damages.

A social media backlash also condemned the advert.

One of the artists involved in creating the advert, was quoted to have said: “One can be proud of this work. First of all because it works: people understand and remember the address. Secondly, it is a brave work, and in the case of the gay movement, traditionally living on the edge, it is more than accurate and justified.”

The poster also won an award for advertising firm Havas Worldwide Kazakhstan, however the firm later apologised, and said it would no longer display it in public. Despite homosexuality being decriminalised in 1998, anti-gay attitudes are still common in Kazakhstan.

Source: PinkNews.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2014 8:21 am 
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Kazakhstani politician: You can identify gays with an easy blood test
13th September 2014
by Nick Duffy

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A Kazakhstani politician has come up with an “easy” method to identify gays – you just have to test the blood of people wearing coloured trousers for ‘degeneratism’.

Dauren Babamuratov, who leads the Bolashak national movement, made the claim in a press conference this week calling for a ban on the “promotion” of homosexuality. A rise in anti-gay sentiment in the country was sparked last month by a poster for a gay club featuring two national heroes kissing.

According to Tengrin News, Mr Babamuratov said: “I think it is very easy to identify a gay person by his or her DNA. A blood test can show the presence of degeneratism in a person. One can see a lot of people in the city’s malls and other public places — these are young people in coloured pants. Unfortunately, suppressing activities of the LGBT community in Kazakhstan is extremely difficult, because there is no law in our country prohibiting this type of activity, that is, the promotion of homosexuality.

Journalist Zhanar Sekerbayeva countered: “There is no gay ‘propaganda’ in Kazakhstan, but there is homophobia. The LGBT community is not an invention of the West, [gays] are much more traditional than ‘traditional’ heterosexuals. LGBT people have always been there since the ancient times – Ancient Rome, Greece, it is only that the attitude towards them was different.”

The mayor of capital city Astana claimed the media are “brainwashing” children.

Source: PinkNews.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 7:52 am 
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Kazakh Senate passes 'gay propaganda' bill
By Darren Wee
26 February 2015

The Senate of Kazakhstan has passed a bill banning 'propaganda of a non-traditional sexual orientation.'

The upper house of the Kazakh parliament 19 February approved the measure 'for the protection of children from information harmful to their health and development.'

Aldan Smayil, a member of the Majilis (the lower chamber of the Kazakh parliament), proposed prohibiting 'gay propaganda' in August 2013. 'The draft provides a ban on information products depicting cruelty and violence, provoking children to life-threatening acts, including suicide, containing scenes of pornographic, sexual and erotic nature, promoting non-traditional sexual orientation,' he told the Senate last week.

The clause banning 'gay propaganda' was a late addition and is similar in language to laws enacted in Russia and under consideration in Kyrgyzstan.

US human rights watchdog Freedom House condemned the law. 'This law will take a bad freedom of expression situation in Kazakhstan and make it worse,' said Susan Corke, director of Eurasia programs.

'Despite the government’s claim, banning “propaganda of a non-traditional sexual orientation” has nothing to do with the safety of children. It is simply a disguise for discrimination and intolerance that will allow government censors to punish speech they don’t like. The bill should be rejected.' A companion bill to introduce penalties for disseminating 'gay propaganda' to children under 18 was also approved.

Gay sex is not illegal in Kazakhstan but the law met little resistance in the central Asian country.

Source: GayStarNews

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2015 6:26 pm 
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Kazakhstan Strikes Down ‘Gay Propaganda’ Law After Olympics Outcry
By Joanna Lillis
May 27, 2015

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Michael Grau / Wikicommons - The TV-Tower in Almaty, Kazakhstan, from downtown.

Originally published by EurasiaNet.org.

Kazakhstan’s Constitutional Council has struck down a controversial law that would have outlawed the “propaganda” of homosexuality to minors, amid signs the legislation was damaging the country’s bid to host the Winter Olympics.

The law was “not in line with the constitution of the Republic of Kazakhstan,” the Vlast.kz website quoted the Constitutional Council (which rules on the legality of legislation) as saying.

The law governed “the protection of children from information causing damage to their health and development." It was passed by parliament in February. The council struck down the law because of unclear wording rather than human rights concerns, the Vlast.kz report said.

The announcement came after a group of household-name sports stars urged the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to reject Kazakhstan’s bid to host the Winter Games in Almaty in 2022, arguing that the law outlawing the “propaganda” of homosexuality to minors was incompatible with Olympic principles of equality.

“In light of Kazakhstan’s aspirations to host the 2022 Olympic Winter Games and their recent consideration of legislation prohibiting ‘propaganda of non-traditional sexual orientation,’ we urge the IOC to reiterate to Kazakh authorities that discrimination with regard to sexual orientation is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic movement,” the sportsmen and women said in the open letter to IOC chairman Thomas Bach, published by the Athlete Ally group, which fights homophobia in sport.

The 27 signatories included Olympic medalists and stars who have excelled in sports ranging from tennis, rowing and wrestling to snowboarding, speed skating and swimming.

“Athletes Pressure Olympics to Take a Stand on Kazakhstan's Anti-Gay Legislation — no way should the Olympics be there,” tweeted one of its most famous signatories, U.S. tennis player Martina Navratilova (who married her long-term lesbian partner last year), on May 15 after a report on the outcry was published in The Huffington Post.

Kazakhstan’s Constitutional Court quietly struck the law down three days later, the Informburo.kz news site said, but the ruling was not reported until May 26. Choosing Almaty as host city for the games “would directly undermine the IOC’s own Olympic Charter, which bars discrimination based on sexual orientation,” the letter remarked.

The legislation targeting “propaganda” of homosexuality to minors in Kazakhstan (which has previously come under fire for failing to protect the rights of the LGBT community) was similar to a Russian law adopted in 2013, which caused an outcry during Sochi’s hosting of the Winter Olympics last year.

Kazakhstan’s government has eagerly promoted Almaty’s bid to host the games, which the administration of President Nursultan Nazarbayev sees as an opportunity to raise the country’s international profile, though critics dismiss it as a costly vanity project that risks spawning the type of rampant corruption that marred the Sochi games.

Almaty’s chances of selection success have risen as other bidders have pulled out, leaving Beijing as the only rival. The IOC is due to make the final decision on the host city on July 31. It is likely no coincidence that Kazakhstan’s Constitutional Council has now struck down the controversial law that was damaging Almaty’s bid. The decision could not have occurred in Kazakhstan’s top-down political system without a nod from Nazarbayev.

Source: Moscow Times.

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