TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Mon Jun 25, 2018 7:37 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 9:54 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Saturday, 20 December 2008

Dark side of Argentine sex city

By Daniel Schweimler
BBC News, Buenos Aires

La Plata is a lovely city. Its central plaza is dominated by a beautiful cathedral, its tree-lined streets are full of interesting shops and quality restaurants.

Image
Some call La Plata the prostitution capital of Argentina

It is a thriving university city and the capital of Buenos Aires province - the largest and wealthiest in Argentina. But there is also a sinister, sleazy underside to La Plata. Some call it the prostitution capital of Argentina. In and around the city there are hundreds of brothels, incongruous from the outside - in residential streets, at the bottom of dirt roads - often only recognisable by a straggly array of coloured light-bulbs or a barely visible name.

Susana Martinez is a former prostitute who now helps to run the Sandra Cabrera health centre in the city. It is a health centre run by sex workers for sex workers. It was set up two years ago, with the help of the local authorities, after prostitutes, rent-boys, transvestites and transsexuals complained they were suffering discrimination in the public hospitals. Sandra Cabrera was a campaigning sex worker killed by the police in a still-unresolved case.

Sex workers' needs

"They would shout things like 'You deal with the whores,' or 'Look what's blown in with the rubbish,'" said Susana.

Image

She added that sex workers also had different medical needs and worked different hours to other people. The public health system simply was not serving their needs. A recent study in Argentina also found that one in three people did not know how Aids and the HIV virus were transmitted. This in a well-informed public after more than 20 years of campaigns and advertising.

So former sex workers, like Susana, and those still working, like Mishel, work with the medical staff at their health centre to build trust with the patients and to educate as well as treat. "We needed to educate and to make people aware of our specific problems but also to tell them not to discriminate because of the work we do," said Susana.

Image
Susana Martinez does twice-weekly visits to brothels

"One day a colleague told me that our doctor, while doing the check-ups, tried to persuade the girls to leave prostitution and the streets. I was angry because we are free to choose. I've never told them to stop being doctors and change profession. So, as you can see, it was hard work to make everybody aware and respectful." She added: "We also had to educate the nurses. They were terrible. They'd come from hospitals where it's common to shout and maltreat people."

Many of the prostitutes that come to work in La Plata are from Paraguay and Peru or the poor northern provinces of Argentina. They are usually young, sometimes too young to have sex legally, and nearly always badly educated and frightened. Twice a week, Susana does the rounds in a mini-bus, visiting the brothels and talking to the prostitutes. She distributes condoms and tries to find out how the young girls and boys are doing, how they are being treated. They cannot go everywhere and some places are simply too dangerous for them to visit. Much of the sex industry in La Plata is operated either outside the law or on the very edges of the law.

Tricked

The health workers asked me not to film or record, to keep my mouth shut and, if asked, say I was from the health ministry.

Image
They knew I was underage. I got nothing. Maybe some perfume or a couple of pesos

The first place we visited was down a dirt road, outside the city. Its name was displayed in dull purple lights. Loud music blared from inside. There were pool tables, an empty stage and a silver disco globe. The young owner behind the bar eyed us suspiciously. Susana, bubbly and friendly, greeted him and the two girls sitting silently on stools at the bar. One kept her face hidden, the other sipped her drink nervously. Both wore short skirts and high heels.

It was early and work had not yet begun. Two men playing pool made phone calls then walked to the far side of the almost empty room. Susana plonked a bag of condoms on the bar and asked the owner to sign for them, which he did. Susana asked if she could talk to one of the girls in private and after five minutes returned. The girl, from Paraguay, was pregnant.

Some are kidnapped and forced into the sex industry. Others are tricked with offers of jobs as domestic workers or waitresses only, on arrival in Argentina, to have their documents confiscated and their freedom curtailed.

Police involvement

With no money and no ID, there is nowhere to go. Families back in Paraguay or northern Argentina are poor and often working away from home themselves. And the local police are some of the main beneficiaries of the industry.

Susana knows where the underage girls and boys are working but, she said, while the authorities are so closely involved in the industry there is nothing they can do to change the situation. Through their health centre they can at least provide education, protection and condoms - plenty of condoms. They distribute 20,000 a month, paid for by the local authorities. After visiting the brothels, we toured the dark streets.

Firstly, the area where the female prostitutes work, then the male ones. The mini-bus pulls up and Susanna leans out of the window waving a plastic bag full of condoms. "Protection, condoms!" she shouts. Many of the workers know Susana, recognise the van and come sauntering over with a kiss, a joke and a bit of gossip. Others, new to the city, are more wary. Susana asks them how they are doing, if they need any help and tells them where the health centre is.

Then we move on to the area where the transvestites and transsexuals work, precarious on high heels, displaying buttocks and breasts, giggling and mocking one another. "They're all Peruvians," said Susana.

Image
Condoms are handed out to sex workers at brothels and on streets

According to Mishel, one of the reasons the industry has thrived in La Plata is that the authorities allow it, often encouraging it to do so. He lives and works in a house in the centre of the city with 13 friends, both men and women, including a married couple. It is a co-operative. The rooms are clean, they advertise in local papers and can afford one another some kind of protection.

But the police insist that they too provide protection. Mishel pays the local force $400 a month. "Otherwise," he said. "They've said they can't protect us." "From who?" I asked him. "From third parties," he replied. "I don't like it but there's nothing else I can do if I want to continue working."

Mishel, like all the sex workers in La Plata, has a story to tell. He is from a small, conservative town in rural Buenos Aires province. His relationship with his mother deteriorated when she realised he was gay and, as a young boy, he left for Buenos Aires. There his only option was to work the streets. But one day he was picked up by a person who he thought was a client. He spent the next nine years as a sex slave, forced to sleep with whoever his owners told him to - often servicing guests at the city's five-star hotels. "It was wealthy businessmen," he explained. "Often foreigners and even diplomats. They knew I was underage. I got nothing. Maybe some perfume or a couple of pesos."

Powerlessness

He finally escaped and went to live with his brother who was studying in La Plata. After working for a while in a burger bar, he went back on the street. It was the only way he could earn enough to study and to pay for his brothers and sisters to study.

The Sandra Cabrera health centre has become a model. They receive visits from other parts of Argentina and from abroad. It can do nothing to tackle prostitution in La Plata. Those, like Susana and Mishel, know the industry only too well, they know it is deeply ingrained in Argentine society and they are powerless to help. But they do know what problems the city's sex workers face. And they do provide some protection, plenty of understanding, medical care and advice and some hope for people living on the margins of an often cruel and uncaring society.

Source: BBC News.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 6:31 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Small surprise for Mother's Day: 'Mum, I am gay'
8 May 2008

Image
The Axel Hotel in Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires - "Best wishes on Mother's Day, Mum. By the way, I am gay."

The coming-out of one's own children has thrown several mothers off their chairs in more liberal societies. In Catholic, conservative Argentina, however, it continues to imply great fear and family drama. One mother even wished her son's death after such a revelation, says the German-Argentine Irmgard Fischer, herself the mother of a gay son. As a result, she founded the first association for parents of homosexuals in Argentina in a bid to help others.

Laws banning discrimination of homosexuals were passed in the South American country over 10 years ago. Since 2003, same-sex civil unions have been legal in parts of Argentina, and Buenos Aires is considered the capital of the gay movement in South America. Yet the act of coming out remains tense.

Argentina remains a conservative country, marked by Catholic customs and is full of machos who are both boastful and inhibited. On the sidelines of gay luxury hotels - like the Axel Hotel recently opened in Buenos Aires - and gay cruises, everyday life is still dominated by intolerance and the rude jokes of fellows in belated puberty. Men holding hands or women who kiss each other, which are frequent sights in other cities, are very rare on the streets of Buenos Aires. And if they were more common, they would most likely be a rock on which most would stumble.

"Of course I respect homosexuality, but it is still strange for me when I actually see something like that," says one young Argentine who stares at two men kissing in a nightclub early Saturday morning. To look at some, you would think their eyes are about to pop out of their sockets and whispers of "I can't believe it" go around.

Fischer herself needed a long time to come to terms with her son's homosexuality. She thought only of the silly jokes heard everyday on the street and on the radio. However, she had no idea of what homosexuality actually was - a problem that many Argentines share. At first she was shocked, the revelation left her "cold as ice," the 73-year-old woman recalls. Then, she started to gather information, and tried to understand what her son's gayness meant. And quickly, Fischer founded an organization - unprecedented in Latin America - for parents of homosexual children.

The model for her initiative was an association in Germany which she discovered through her son. "I thought to myself we need something like that over here," said Fischer, whose parents left Germany and stayed in many countries before finally settling in Argentina. Still, despite the fliers that she handed out at every gay gathering, nobody came to the meetings for the first year-and-a-half. "It's obvious. Children do not tell their parents about their homosexuality, so why should these parents care that we exist?" she explained.

Only when Fischer herself ventured into the open with a personal "coming-out," did other parents in similar situations make contact with her. Nowadays, up to 30 people attend to the monthly meetings. The worst thing for parents, Fischer said, is the thought that they will not have grandchildren. Many of those contacting her are ashamed of having done something wrong in their children's education, and they are scared of how they will be judged by society.

Consequently, hardly anyone dares to even mention homosexuality, she explained. Many of those affected lead double lives, a drama for all those involved. In Argentina, homosexuality is still a sort of misfortune.

"When I told my friends and acquaintances about my gay son, all of them seemed somewhat glad that it had not happened to them," Fischer said.

Source: Earth Times.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 11:38 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentine Congress considers same-sex marriage
By Vanessa Hand Orellana
29 October 2009

Image
Lesbian couples stand in front of Argentina's National Congress gathering signatures to support a possible law bill on gay marriage in Buenos Aires, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2009.

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Is Argentina ready to become Latin America's first nation to legalize gay marriage?

Gay and lesbian activists think so — and they have a growing number of supporters in Congress, which opened debate Thursday on whether to change dozens of laws that define marriage as a union between a man and a woman.

"We can't expect social equality if the state is legitimizing inequality," said Maria Rachid, president of the Argentine Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Federation. "We now have the social and political context necessary to change the law."

It remains to be seen whether activists have enough votes to overcome opposition from religious groups. The Roman Catholic Church remains a driving force in Argentina, where presidents were required to be both married and Catholic until a 1994 reform. Some Catholic and evangelical Christian groups have accused the government of trying to subvert the natural order of life, promote perversions and destroy the family as an institution.

"This should not be understood as the denial of anyone's rights," said Archbishop Jose Maria Arancedo of Santa Fe, who took a gentler tone in a recent radio address. "It's possible both to be progressive and to defend the family, founded on the institution of marriage."

Argentina's capital established its gay-friendly reputation in 2002 by becoming the first Latin American city to legalize same-sex civil unions. Four other Argentine cities later did the same, and such unions also now are recognized in Mexico City and some Mexican and Brazilian states. Uruguay alone has legalized civil unions nationwide. Canada is the only nation in the Americas where gay marriage is now legal; in the Spanish-speaking world, only Spain has taken this additional step.

The capital's civil-unions law was initially celebrated as a huge victory for gay and lesbian rights, but such partnerships don't confer many rights exclusive to married couples, such as the right to adopt children in the name of both parents, to enable a partner to gain citizenship and to inherit wealth or be included in insurance policies.

"A civil union is a link that grants certain rights, but not those available to a married couple, which only a national law can grant," the bills' co-sponsor, Rep. Vilma Ibarra, told the Associated Press. "This is the first round in a long process, but it is already a success to have it out there."

Rep. Julian Martin Obiglio, a minority party member, is among lawmakers who would rather expand the rights that apply to civil unions than alter the definition of marriage. "I don't think the term should be the same for a union between a man and a woman and two people of the same sex," Obiglio said.

The proposal has ruling-party support but President Cristina Fernandez has yet to take a public stand on gay marriage. Rachid said more than 20 lawmakers have signed on as supporters of same-sex marriage, and they believe they have enough votes in committee for a full vote in the lower house. It would then go to the Senate.

Rachid and her partner, Claudia Castro, were among the first same-sex couples in Buenos Aires to form a civil union — and the first to test Argentine law by applying for a marriage license in 2007. Their lawsuit over the denial is pending at the Supreme Court.

"The opinion of religious leaders who dictate how other people should lead their lives should apply only to those who share their creed, and not to the rest of society," Rachid said. "We don't need a law to define us as a couple — we've already been a couple for more than 10 years," Castro added. "We just want to have equal rights."

If the law passes, the couple plan to be first in line for a marriage license.

Source: Yahoo! AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2009 6:45 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Gay couple hopes wedding sets precedent in Argentina
by Luis Andres Henao
18 November 2009

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) — Two Argentine men who will soon wed in Latin America's first legal same-sex marriage hope it will pave the way for other homosexual couples in Argentina to marry.

Alex Freyre and Jose Maria Di Bello were granted a marriage license last week by a judge who overruled a ban on gay marriages in the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires, arguing it was unconstitutional.

The couple are HIV positive and plan to marry on December 1 on World Aids Day. "We're very happy, but also very nervous because we feel an enormous responsibility," Freyre told Reuters on Tuesday night. "It's a historic accomplishment that recognizes gay rights and opens a judicial way to remove barriers."

Argentina became the first Latin American country to allow civil unions by same-sex couples in 2002. Civil unions in Buenos Aires and several other Argentine cities grant same-sex couples some legal marital rights, but not others such as the right to adopt. Elsewhere in Latin America, same-sex civil unions are allowed in Uruguay and Mexico City.

Freyre and Di Bello previously tried to marry in April, but were turned down by a separate judge. The new judicial ruling applies only to their case, but it will likely increase pressure on lawmakers to debate a gay marriage bill now deadlocked in Congress. Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri has said he does not plan to challenge the ruling.

Gay rights groups said the decision was a victory they hope will set the heavily Roman Catholic country on the path to becoming the first to allow same-sex marriages in the region. "Although the marriage law has not been changed, it sets a very important precedent," said Cesar Cigliutti, president of the Argentine Homosexual Community group.

Argentina's influential Roman Catholic Church criticized the judicial decision as "reckless" and urged authorities to reconsider the ruling.

Freyre said he hoped the marriage would enable him to enjoy rights granted to heterosexual married couples like tenants' rights and the opportunity to adopt children. "We're starting a joint married life that wasn't in our plans until recently because the law wouldn't allow it," he said. "It's a wind of change. We're boosting the confidence of millions of gay and lesbians in Latin America."

(Editing by Peter Cooney)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:54 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentina halts 1st Latin American gay marriage
December 1, 2009
By VANESSA HAND ORELLANA
Associated Press Writer

Image
Jose Maria Di Bello and Alex Freyre

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — They had planned a wedding day like Latin America has never seen.

But as Jose Maria Di Bello and Alex Freyre were being fitted for their tuxedos an Argentine judge issued an order late Monday blocking the continent's first gay marriage on Tuesday. Di Bello and Freyre plan to show up anyway at the civil registry for the ceremony they scheduled after another court earlier authorized the wedding, said Maria Rachid, who headed the legal team handling the couple's lawsuit.

If they're stopped, the couple of nearly five years will lead a protest instead of throwing their two bouquets on the street that Buenos Aires officials already had agreed to cordon off for the media spectacle the wedding was expected to draw.

"They are shocked and saddened by the news, but still have hopes that the wedding will go forth as planned," said Rachid, president of the Argentine Federation for Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transsexuals.

National Judge Marta Gomez Alsina ordered the wedding blocked until the issue can be considered by the Supreme Court, according to the official court Web site. The ruling reversed a decision by city Judge Gabriela Seijas to allow the wedding to go forward. Seijas ruled Nov. 20 that the couple had been unconstitutionally denied a marriage license, and Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri announced he would not appeal the judge's decision.

Di Bello and Freyre — both HIV positive — chose Tuesday for their wedding because it is World AIDS Day and they want to help raise awareness about the issue that brought them together. Di Bello, 41, an executive at the Argentine Red Cross, met Freyre, 39, executive director of the Buenos Aires AIDS Foundation, at an HIV awareness conference. "We are in love and excited about getting married, but we can't really think about the wedding party, the wedding night, or the honeymoon," Freyre said. "We are activists, and how can we show our faces if we forget about the rights we are representing?"

The couple sued after being denied a marriage license last April. The court rulings apply to their case only, though dozens of other gay couples are now trying the same legal route to win permission to wed. A bill that would legalize gay marriage was introduced in Congress in October but it has stalled without a vote.

"This wedding serves as justice," said Rep. Juliana Di Tullio of President Cristina Fernandez's Officialist party and co-author of the bill. "Eventually the issue will have to be dealt with."

Image

Only seven countries in the world allow gay marriages: Canada, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium. U.S. states that permit same-sex marriage are Iowa, Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut and New Hampshire.

Argentina's capital established its gay-friendly reputation in 2002 by becoming the first Latin American city to legalize same-sex civil unions. Four other Argentine cities later did the same, and such unions also now are recognized in Mexico City and some Mexican and Brazilian states. Uruguay alone has legalized civil unions nationwide.

While Buenos Aires' civil-union law was celebrated as a huge victory for gay and lesbian rights, there are still many rights exclusive to married couples, such as the right to adopt children in the name of both parents, to enable a partner to gain citizenship and to inherit wealth or be included in insurance policies.

Many in Argentina are still opposed to gay marriage, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, which continues to be a strong influence in state affairs. Soon after Macri announced he would not appeal the city judge's decision to permit Di Bello and Freyre to wed, Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio released a statement expressing his disapproval.

Amid the controversy and media frenzy around their planned marriage, the couple is committed to each other and their cause. Among the camera lights and repeated questions during a prenuptial interview, the two turned to look at each other mid-sentence as if they where the only two people in the room.

"I see old couples walking down the street together and I want that to be us," Di Bello said. "I want to be able to turn to him when I'm old and wrinkly and call him my husband."

Source: Breitbart.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:52 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Latin America's first gay marriage thwarted
December 1, 2009
By VANESSA HAND ORELLANA
Associated Press Writer

Image
Alex Freyre, right, and his partner Jose Maria Di Bello, center, attend a press conference as Argentina's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transexual Federation President Maria Rachid looks on in Buenos Aires, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2009.

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — An Argentine couple's attempt to unite in Latin America's first gay marriage was thwarted Tuesday when city officials decided to block the wedding because of conflicting judicial rulings.

Jose Maria Di Bello and Alex Freyre showed up at the Buenos Aires civil registry office despite a national judge's ruling late Monday that overturned a city court's decision to permit them to wed. The first judge ruled again Tuesday that they could wed.

The couple, dressed in black suits, silver ties and a red band symbolizing AIDS awareness, waited for hours in the municipal office as officials debated which judge to obey. They were surrounded by supporters and a swarm of media.

"It's hard to have to spend this day waiting for a right that should have been ours," said Freyre, as he fought to hold back tears.

In a twist of events, the final decision fell to Mayor Mauricio Macri, who had originally given the green light to the wedding. Among cheers and chants in what felt like the final seconds of championship game, the lawyers came out to announce the news: The city would not allow the marriage until the Supreme Court has ruled on the case.

Gay rights groups expressed anger at the decision and said they would march to city hall in protest. "In a complete act of disrespect, the city government has decided to ignore the city judge's ruling," said Maria Rachid, president of the Argentine Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transsexuals. "Macri lied to us."

The couple, wedding bouquets in hand, joined protesters outside the mayor's office. "We were not allowed to marry today, but it will happen for us soon," Freyre said, his arm around Di Bello.

Source: Breitbart.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2009 8:39 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Gay marriage in Argentina is 1st in Latin America
By Almudena Calatrava, Associated Press Writer
29 December 2009

Attachment:
capt.c3343813753546c6974cd2a7762eff5b.aptopix_argentina_gay_marriage_bai108.jpg
capt.c3343813753546c6974cd2a7762eff5b.aptopix_argentina_gay_marriage_bai108.jpg [ 88.22 KiB | Viewed 2403 times ]

In this photo distributed by the press office of Tierra del Fuego government, Alex Freyre, right, and his partner Jose Maria Di Bello, both HIV positive, kiss after getting married at the civil registry in Ushuaia, southern Argentina, Monday, Dec. 28, 2009. The couple's union is the first gay marriage in Latin America.
(AP Photo/Government of Tierra del Fuego)

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — They had to travel to the ends of the Earth to do it, but two Argentine men succeeded in becoming Latin America's first same-sex married couple.

After their first attempt to wed earlier this month in Buenos Aires was thwarted, gay rights activists Jose Maria Di Bello and Alex Freyre took their civil ceremony to the capital of Argentina's Tierra del Fuego province, where a sympathetic governor backed their bid to make Latin American history. The couple exchanged rings Monday in Ushuaia, the southernmost city in the world, closer to Antarctica than Buenos Aires. The informal ceremony was witnessed by state and federal officials.

"My knees didn't stop shaking," said Di Bello. "We are the first gay couple in Latin America to marry." Di Bello, 41, an executive at the Argentine Red Cross, met Freyre, 39, executive director of the Buenos Aires AIDS Foundation, at an HIV awareness conference. Both are HIV-positive. At the indoor civil ceremony, the grooms wore sport coats without ties, and had large red ribbons draped around their necks in solidarity with other people living with HIV.

Argentina's Constitution is silent on whether marriage must be between a man and a woman, effectively leaving the matter to provincial and city officials. The men tried to get married in Argentina's capital but city officials, who had earlier said the ceremony could proceed, refused to wed them citing conflicting judicial rulings.

Di Bello said Ushuaia initially declined to authorize the marriage, but went ahead after the couple received backing from Tierra del Fuego province. Gov. Fabiana Rios said in a statement that gay marriage "is an important advance in human rights and social inclusion and we are very happy that this has happened in our state." An official representing the federal government's anti-discrimination agency, Claudio Morgado, attended the wedding and called the occasion "historic."

Many in Argentina and throughout Latin America remain opposed to gay marriage, particularly the Roman Catholic Church.

"The decision took me by surprise and I'm concerned," Bishop Juan Carlos, of the southern city of Rio Gallegos, told the Argentine news agency DyN. He called the marriage "an attack against the survival of the human species."

But same-sex civil unions have been legalized in Uruguay, Buenos Aires, Mexico City and some states in Mexico and Brazil. Marriage generally carries more exclusive rights such as adopting children, inheriting wealth and enabling a partner to gain citizenship.

Legal analyst Andres Gil Dominguez said the Tierra del Fuego government appeared to base its authorization on a broad interpretation of the Argentine Constitution and obligations under international treaties. Rios said her province's approval was based on a ruling by a Buenos Aires judge who declared two provisions of the constitution discriminatory and gave the go-ahead for the Dec. 1 marriage, which was then blocked by another judge's ruling based on civil law.

Individual provinces may not have final say over same-sex marriages for long. A bill that would legalize gay marriage was introduced in Argentina's Congress in October but it has stalled without a vote. Argentina's Supreme Court currently is analyzing appeals by same-sex couples whose marriages were rejected. A Supreme Court justice said on Monday that the high court would likely rule on issues of same-sex marriage sometime in 2010, but could defer to Congress if legislation moves forward.

Only seven countries in the world allow gay marriages: Canada, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium. U.S. states that permit same-sex marriage are Iowa, Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut and New Hampshire.

Earlier this month, lawmakers in Mexico City made it the first in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage. Leftist Mayor Marcelo Ebrard was widely expected to sign the measure into law.

Source: Yahoo! AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 8:37 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Eat pork, spice up your sex life: Argentina's Kirchner
28 January 2010

Image
Eating pork is at least as effective as popping a Viagra pill to spice up your sex life, according to Argentine President Cristina Kirchner, who claims to have tested the theory.

"Pork consumption improves sexual activity," Kirchner informed a surprised gathering of business people at a meeting at the presidential palace.

"This is not a small detail," she said at the gathering to announce a reduction in the price of pork. "Besides, some nicely grilled pork is much more gratifying than taking Viagra." Kirchner said she ate some roasted pork over the weekend with her husband, former president Nestor Kirchner, at the couple's retreat in Argentina's bucolic southern Patagonia region, with "impressive" results. "We were in high spirits the whole weekend," she said, smiling. "I'm a pork fanatic," she added, "and I'm not saying this just to impress you, or for self-promotion."

The head of the association of pork producers, Juan Uccelli, on Thursday backed up Kirchner's claims. He said that people in Denmark and Japan, where pork consumption is high, "have much more harmonious sexual lives than us Argentines have."

Argentines however are the world's most voracious beef eaters, with an annual per capita consumption of between 68 and 73 kilos.

President Kirchner has been the target of fierce criticism lately for seeking to remove the head of the Central Bank, Martin Redrado.

Source: Breitbart AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 5:21 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Another Same-Sex Marriage Nullified in Argentina
17 April 2010

BUENOS AIRES (EFE) — A judge on Friday voided the marriage last week of two women in this capital, the first union of its kind in Argentina, judicial officials said.

Argentine Norma Castillo and Uruguay"s Ramona Arevalo, who are both 67 and have been a couple for the past three decades, married on April 9 after getting the go-ahead from Judge Elena Liberatori. But Judge Martha Gomez Alsina on Friday decided to annul the marriage, granting a petition by a Catholic attorney to declare the union "non-existent."

The wedding of Castillo and Arevalo, which was the third same-sex marriage in Argentina and the first involving two women, came amid debate of a bill in the lower house that would allow gays to marry and adopt children.

The bill is staunchly opposed by the Catholic Church.

Earlier this week, Argentine Judge Marcos Meillien declared "nonexistent" last year"s union of Alex Freyre and Jose Maria di Bello, the first same-sex marriage in Argentina and all of Latin America, authorities said Thursday. The judge said Argentine law does not include any provision for the marriage of two people of the same gender.

Freyre and Di Bello married on Dec. 28 in Ushuaia, the capital of Tierra del Fuego, after having tried to do so without success in Buenos Aires the previous month. More than 60 same-sex couples have presented requests to be able to marry in Argentina, where currently civil unions between people of the same sex are allowed in four cities, among them Buenos Aires.

The capital"s Civil Union law, which was approved in late 2002, was the country"s first legislation on the matter and the first recognition of gay couples in Latin America.

Source: efe / Latin American Herald Tribune.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 4:25 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentina Celebrates Fifth Gay Marriage
May 1, 2010

Image

Just days after the Argentine Congress postponed debate on a gay marriage bill, a fifth gay couple has married in the country's capital, the Argentine news agency Telam reported.

The gay rights group Federation Argentine of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Trans — la Federacion Argentina de Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales y Trans (FALGBT) — announced the union of Alejandro Luna and Gilles Grall, a Frenchman, on Friday.

They are the fourth gay couple to marry in Buenos Aires so far. In December, two men — Alejandro Freyre and Jose Maria Di Bello — became the first gay couple to marry in Argentina. The couple married in the southern state of Tierra del Fuego after Governor Fabiana Rios issued a special decree. The wedding was originally scheduled to take place in Buenos Aires, but a national judge ordered a halt to the ceremony at the last minute, overruling a lower court's decision.

"Gilles Grall is a French citizen," Maria Rachid, president of FALGBT, said in a statement, "so this marriage is unique in allowing the couple to continue their relationship, and only through marriage may Gilles obtain permanent residence and remain in Argentina with the person he loves and chose to share his life with."

Grall, who met Luna during a 2008 business trip, said: "When you find love, anything is possible."

On Wednesday, Argentina's Chamber of Deputies (la Camara de Diputados) failed to gain sufficient support to open debate on a gay marriage bill, but lawmakers say they'll hold a special session next Wednesday.

In announcing the Luna-Grall marriage, Rachid urged lawmakers to approve the gay marriage bill.

Recognition of gay unions is gaining ground in Latin America. Several Argentine cities, including its largest city of Buenos Aires, have approved civil unions for gay couples. In March, a gay marriage law took effect in Mexico City, making it the first municipality in the region to approve such unions. Uruguay recognizes gay and lesbian couples with civil unions.

Source: On Top Magazine.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:19 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentina players get sex green light on non-match days
27 May 2010

Image
Argentine national team doctor Donato Villani watches the team from the sideline

On non-match days with regular partners and no champagne: the Argentina squad at the World Cup have received a conditional green light to have sex during the June 11-July 11 tournament.

Team doctor Donato Villami, speaking to Radio Del Plata, said: "The players will be able to have sex during the World Cup in South Africa, but with regular partners and without champagne or other drinks. "Sex is part of everybody's social life and it's not a problem in itself. Problems arise with the excesses: all the extras, a non-regular partner or in hours reserved for rest."

Argentina will play Nigeria in their first Group B match on June 12, with matches against Greece and South Korea to follow.

Source: Breitbart AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 7:49 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentine church-backed anti-gay marriage protest
13 July 2010

Image
A man holds a banner reading: "Family, Man + Woman" in front of the Argentinian Congress building during a rally against a gay marriage law under discussion in Buenos Aires on July 13.

Tens of thousands of people have taken part in a church-sponsored, anti-gay marriage demonstration outside Congress in Buenos Aires, as senators prepared to vote on a bill already approved by the lower chamber.

Image
Buenos Aires, Argentina: Members of Catholic groups protest against a same-sex marriage bill outside Argentina's congress
Natacha Pisarenko/AP

"We want a daddy and a mommy," "Say yes to the real family," read some of the signs scattered among the protesters decrying what Roman Catholic church officials have branded "the devil's project."

Argentina, where 91 percent of the population says it is Catholic, could become the first Latin American country to pass a law legalizing marriage between same-sex couples if the Senate adopts the bill on Wednesday. The measure, which would grant the same rights to homosexual couples as heterosexual ones, cleared a first hurdle on May 5 in the lower chamber, but the Senate is gearing for a tougher battle.

Buenos Aires Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio read a message at the demonstration saying a marriage between a man and a woman "is the only natural path to procreation." "If they approve this bill it would mean a real and serious reversal for anthropology," he told his cheering followers.

Some 200 pro-gay marriage demonstrators gathered at Buenos Aires' iconic Obelisco monument, banging pots and blowing vuvuzelas, in the "Make Noise for Equality" campaign of Argentina's Anti-discrimination Institute, Inadi.

Image
Buenos Aires, Argentina: A couple kiss outside congress during a rally to support a proposal legalising same-sex marriage
Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Source: Breitbart AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 7:51 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Thousands demonstrate against Argentina plans to legalise same-sex marriage

Supporters of measure also take to streets to stage rallies in Buenos Aires and other cities

Wednesday 14 July 2010

Image
Alejandro Freyre (left) and Jose Maria Di Bello had their marriage blocked in Buenos Aires in December. Photograph: Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of demonstrators today gathered outside Argentina's congress in the capital, Buenos Aires, to protest against a proposal to legalise same-sex marriage. Supporters of the measure also took to the streets in loud rallies in the city and across the country.

Image
Demonstrators hold a banner that reads in Spanish "Neither union nor adoption. Only: men and women" outside Congress in Buenos Aires, Wednesday July 14, 2010. Argentina's House of Deputies has approved same-sex marriage and sent the legislation to the Senate, which is discussing its consideration Wednesday. President Cristina Fernandez promises not to veto the measure if it reaches her desk.
(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Image
A demonstrators holds a banner reading in Spanish "God protect us from your followers", outside Argentina's congress during a rally to support a proposal to legalize same-sex marriage in Buenos Aires, Wednesday, July 14, 2010. On Wednesday, senators are expected to vote over the bill which would make Argentina become the first Latin American country to legalize same sex marriage.
(AP Photo/ Natacha Pisarenko)

The House of Deputies has approved same-sex marriage and sent the legislation to the senate for consideration today. The legislation — which would open the way to adoptions by same-sex couples — has been challenged by the Roman Catholic church and other religious groups. The main slogan for the anti-legislation protest was: "Children have a right to a mother and a father".

The Argentine president, Cristina Fernández, has promised not to veto the measure if it reaches her desk. Argentina remains mainly Catholic, but hostility to homosexuals has waned in the past decade — a trend mirrored across Latin America.

Image
Demonstrators wave a gay pride flag outside Congress in support of a proposal to legalize same-sex marriage in Buenos Aires, Wednesday July 14, 2010. Argentina's House of Deputies has approved same-sex marriage and sent the legislation to the Senate, which is discussing its consideration Wednesday. President Cristina Fernandez promises not to veto the measure if it reaches her desk.
(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Many countries permit civil unions and some, including Uruguay, allow adoptions. Mexico City — though not the rest of Mexico — allows gay marriage, but Argentina would be the first country in Latin America to grant gay men and lesbians the same rights as heterosexuals. Buenos Aires is a gay-friendly capital with bars, restaurants and hotels catering to the pink pound.

Five gay and lesbian couples recently married after local judges authorised the ceremonies, claiming the constitution supported freedom of choice for couples. Other judges overturned some of those marriages as illegal, leaving the issue in limbo until the senate votes.

Source: AP via Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 5:54 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentina legalizes gay marriage in historic vote
15 July 2010
By MICHAEL WARREN

Image

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Argentina legalized same-sex marriage Thursday, becoming the first country in Latin America to grant gays and lesbians all the legal rights, responsibilities and protections that marriage gives heterosexual couples.

The vote came down to 33 in favor, 27 against and 3 abstentions in Argentina's Senate shortly after 4 a.m. Since the lower house already approved it, and President Cristina Fernandez is a strong supporter, it now becomes the law of the land, and is sure to bring a wave of marriages by gays and lesbians who have increasingly found Buenos Aires to be more accepting than many other places in the region.

The approval came despite a concerted campaign by the Roman Catholic Church and evangelical groups, which drew 60,000 people to march on Congress and urged parents in churches and schools to work against passage.

Nine gay couples have already married in Argentina after persuading judges that Argentina's constitutional mandate of equality supports their marriage rights, but some of these marriages were later declared invalid.

As the debate stretched on for nearly 16 hours, supporters and opponents of held rival vigils through the frigid night outside the Congress building in Buenos Aires. "Marriage between a man and a woman has existed for centuries, and is essential for the perpetuation of the species," insisted Sen. Juan Perez Alsina, who is usually a loyal supporter of the president but gave a passionate speech against gay marriage.

But Sen. Norma Morandini, another member of the president's party, compared the discrimination closeted gays face to the oppression imposed by Argentina's dictators decades ago. "What defines us is our humanity, and what runs against humanity is intolerance."

Same-sex civil unions have been legalized in Uruguay, Buenos Aires and some states in Mexico and Brazil. Mexico City has legalized gay marriage. Colombia's Constitutional Court granted same-sex couples inheritance rights and allowed them to add their partners to health insurance plans.

But Argentina now becomes the first country in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage nationwide, granting gays and lesbians all the same rights and responsibilities that heterosexuals have. These include many more rights than civil unions, including adopting children and inheriting wealth. The proposed law broadly declares that "marriage provides for the same requisites and effects independent of whether the contracting parties are of the same or different sex."

Image

"Nearly every political and social figure has spoken out in favor of marriage equality for everyone," said Maria Rachid, president of the Argentine Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transsexuals. "And we hope that the Senate reflects this and that Argentina, from today forward, is a more just country for all families."

Among the opponents were teacher Eduardo Morales said he believes the legislation was concocted by Buenos Aires residents out step with the views of the country. "They want to convert this city into the gay capital of the world," said Morales, of San Luis province.

Ines Franck, director of the group Familias Argentinas, said the legislation cuts against centuries of tradition. Opposing the measure "is not discrimination, because the essence of a family is between two people of opposite sexes," he said. "Any variation goes against the law, and against nature."

The president, currently on a state visit to China, spoke out from there against the Argentine Catholic Church's campaign, and the tone she said some religious groups have taken. "It's very worrisome to hear words like 'God's war' or 'the devil's project,' things that recall the times of the Inquisition," she said.

Some opposition leaders have accused the couple of promoting the initiative to gain votes in next year's presidential elections, when Fernandez's husband, former President Nestor Kirchner, is expected to run again. The vote came after Sen. Daniel Filmus called on fellow lawmakers to show the world how much the society has matured. "Argentina is providing a demonstration of its maturity. The society has grown up. We aren't the same as we were before."

Associated Press Staff Writers Almudena Calatrava, Debora Rey and Bridget Huber contributed to this report.
Source: AP News.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Argentina and sex
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 5:06 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Argentine president signs gay marriage law
21 July 2010

Image
A gay pride flag is waved in front of the Argentinan Congress building in Buenos Aires on July 14, 2010.

Flanked by representatives from the gay community, Argentina's President Cristina Kirchner signed into law a historic bill that legalizes same-sex marriage — a Latin American first.

"We are now a more egalitarian society than we were last week," Kirchner said. "These are things that unite us and cannot divide us." The legislation was opposed by some on religious grounds, but it was backed by Kirchner's center-left government and was adopted last week by the Senate in a 33-27 vote, with three abstentions, after 15 hours of debate.

Kirchner's signing ceremony Wednesday was attended by representatives of humanitarian groups that supported the legislation, which made Argentina the first country in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage. "We have not enacted a law but rather a social construct," the president said, stressing that the legislation would create a more pluralistic society.

Argentina's first gay marriage is expected to take place August 13, uniting a couple who have lived together for 34 years. The couple, Ernesto Rodriguez Larrese, 60, and Alejandro Vanelli, 61, were denied a request to wed three years ago.

Maria Rachid, who heads the Argentine Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual Federation, said she expected around 100 same-sex couples to wed around the same date.

Mexico City authorities have offered the first gay couple to wed in Argentina a free honeymoon trip to the Mexican capital and a major resort beach in the country.

Image

Source: Breitbart AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group