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PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:36 pm 
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Mexican lawmaker asks to bar gay unions in public
3 September 2013
By ADRIANA GOMEZ LICON

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Rafael Mendoza

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- A state legislator has caused a stir by asking authorities to bar gay weddings from public spaces, arguing it confuses children in a state that just approved same-sex civil unions.

Colima state lawmaker Rafael Mendoza said mothers came to him with complaints after a wedding took place between a U.S. man and a Mexican man in the main plaza of the city of Cuauhtemoc. He said Tuesday that society is not ready to watch gay weddings, saying the mothers didn't know what to tell their kids when the two men dressed in charro suits kissed. "Parents are coming to me, to my house, to tell me they are against the city carrying out these weddings in public," Mendoza said. "I am not against these civil unions; the only thing is I don't want them in public."

A rival political group said it plans to file a human rights complaint this week charging Mendoza with discrimination. His own party, the Democratic Revolution Party, asked him to take back the comments, since the leftist party has championed gay marriages in Mexico. Mendoza said he is giving up his party leadership in the state congress because he didn't do anything wrong. He said he is representing his constituents and voicing their concerns. "He is discriminating," said Cuauhtemoc Mayor Indira Vizcaino. "He is claiming that it creates a bad image for children and young people to have these gay weddings in public."

Colima's legislature voted in May to approve a change in the state's constitution to create same-sex civil unions. The law provides gay couples with numerous social benefits similar to those of married couples, but Colima still restricts marriage to a man and a woman.

The city of Cuauhtemoc has pushed for making gay marriage legal, and the mayor says 35 same-sex couples have held civil union ceremonies so far and more than a dozen are to come. Currently, same-sex marriages are allowed in Mexico only in Mexico City and in the southern state of Oaxaca. The northern state of Coahuila began allowing same-sex civil unions in 2007.

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:40 am 
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80,000 march for gay pride in Mexico City
30 June 2013

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People march during the Gay Pride Parade in Mexico City on June 29, 2013.

AFP - Clad in colorful costumes -- or nothing at all -- more than 80,000 people participated in Mexico City's gay pride march, officials said.

Amid the procession of people dressed as butterflies, clowns and Indian warriors, were a dozen floats, including one featuring topless transsexuals dancing.

"This is our way to speak out against the social discrimination we face from our government and our society," said Alberto Avila, a 40-year-old bisexual waiter who marched alongside his five-year-old niece. "I've wanted, since I was little, to teach people how to live with diversity," said the man dressed in a purple miniskirt, blond wig, and red heels.

Placards brandished by demonstrators declared "Mom, I'm a lesbian," and "Proud to be transgender," among many others. "Lots of people are attacked for not corresponding to the standard genders demanded by society," claimed a 16-year-old waving a huge rainbow flag.

Mexico City in 2009 approved gay marriage and adoption by same-sex couples, contrasting with mostly conservative policies across the largely Catholic nation. But the Human Rights Commission of Mexico City urged authorities to "enforce the guarantee of respect for rights for its inhabitants" regardless of sexual orientation. Within Latin America, Mexico is second only to Brazil in terms of hate crimes towards gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transexuals, the group said.

Meanwhile, Mexico City Archbishop Norberto Rivera called for the defense of traditional family values. "We do not accept unnatural proposals which disfigure and obscure that splendor" of family, he said during a Mass, according to a local radio broadcast.

Source: France24.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:31 pm 
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Man in Mexico made his girlfriend wear a chastity lock on her pants
October 9, 2013
by Doris Taylor

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Police say a woman told them her boyfriend put a padlock on her pants so she wouldn’t be unfaithful to him. Police say she couldn’t take it anymore.

The 25-year-old woman, in excruciating pain after being unable to go to the restroom for several hours, went to police. A padlock prevented her from taking off her blue jeans. Authorities say the woman lives in an impoverished, rural community in the Mexican gulf state of Veracruz. Police say the woman told them her lover had done this for years and that she was too afraid of him to grab some scissors and cut the jeans.

Police arrested her 40-year-old boyfriend. The police commander told CNN the man produced a key and admitted locking her up. To the surprise of authorities, the woman refused to press charges once the man was detained. The suspect was still taken into custody on a misdemeanor charge, but released a few hours later. The following day, the suspect signed a statement promising to never again use a padlock against his girlfriend or abuse her in any other way.

Araceli Gonzalez is a women’s rights activist in the state of Veracruz. She says both the community and authorities failed the woman. “She was a victim of a crime for 12 years and neither the community nor authorities did anything about it. On the other hand, reaction was only lukewarm and insufficient when the incident was reported. The handling of this case didn’t follow the law. Nobody acted against the aggressor,” says Gonzalez. State authorities say there’s only so much they can do because the woman didn’t press charges.

Gonzalez says that attitude gives a green light to abusers. “It seems like authorities think that women can simply renounce their rights. It’s like they’re saying ‘If she doesn’t recognize the problem, we, as authorities, can’t do anything about it,’” says Gonzalez. Gonzalez believes her case is just one of thousands. Most others, she says, go unreported, with the victims suffering in silence.

Source: WTKR.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:32 pm 
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12 years? And she's 25? He should be arrested for statutory rape! And she obviously didn't really mind, just had to take a piss real badly.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:06 pm 
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Lesbian couple becomes second same-sex marriage in Oaxaca, Mexico
23 December 2013
By Jean Paul Zapata

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Gay couples wed in March 2010 under the new law legalizing gay marriage in Mexico City.

A lesbian couple became the second same-sex marriage to take place in the state of Oaxaca.

Yesterday (22 December) Karina and Gabriela, whose last names have been omitted per their request, married in a private ceremony at approximately 3pm local time.

Alex Ali Mendez Dia, a lawyer for Oaxaca Front for the Respect and Recognition of Sexual Diversity, told Gay Star News the couple has been waiting two years to get married.

While the Oaxaca Front started strategizing along with three gay couples in August 2011 to combat the state’s ban on same-sex marriages using Mexico City's marriage equality bill as a template, the Supreme Court did not rule Oaxaca's ban unconstitutional until December 2012. Mexico’s Supreme Court has also ruled same-sex marriages must be legally recognized in all 32 Mexican states including those that do not allow them to be performed in-state.

The first same-sex couple to marry in Oaxaca was a lesbian couple who tied the knot in a private ceremony on 22 March 2013. Mendez Dia told GSN: 'There’s still a feeling of discrimination in the rest of the country. Couples still run a risk,’ he responded when asked why more same-sex couples on Oaxaca haven’t rushed to get married. It’s still an environment very different from Mexico City,’ he added, pointing out many gay and lesbian couples prefer to wed quickly and without much hassle in Mexico City instead of waiting for the year-long process in Oaxaca. We have no government resources to make a campaign so other same-sex couples can get married, but what we’ve done in Oaxaca, is happening in other places,’ Mendez Dia added.

The Oaxaca Front and other LGBTI rights groups, without state or federal support, turn instead to international human rights organizations to apply global human rights tests to their own legislation. ‘In a few years we’ll make this a reality for our country,’ said Mendez Dia.

Source: GayStarNews.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:20 am 
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Sexual slavery in Mexico – a pimp tells his story
by Jo Tuckman
Monday, 3 February 2014

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A sex worker in downtown Mexico City, where an attempted crackdown on traffickers has met with mixed results. Photograph: Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Pedro's life as a sex trafficker began when he offered a sweet to a pretty young domestic servant out on a Sunday stroll in a provincial city in central Mexico.

"Once I got her laughing, I knew I was in with a chance," he recalls. "Then I got the sun, the moon and the stars down from the sky for her." A week later he was roasting a pig at the home of her poverty-stricken family to celebrate their non-existent forthcoming nuptials. Within a month she was working an alley in a northern border city to raise money to help him pay off an imaginary debt. "The merchandise," he says, using the jargon of the Mexican sex-trafficking business, "had been activated."

After many years of largely ignoring the problem, federal deputies approved a people-trafficking law in 2012 that was supposed to spur a nationwide crackdown. So far, however, only Mexico City has responded with any gusto, ratcheting up the number of raids in the name of rescuing victims and arresting traffickers.

"Sexual exploitation is a modern form of slavery," says Juana Camila Bautista, the head of a special prosecutor's office set up last May to focus on the issue. "We are doing battle against this horror."

But the new official concern about sex trafficking in the capital has sparked controversy. Some say the raids have left many important traffickers untouched. Instead the authorities have been rounding up prostitutes and accusing them of complicity. "If they want to criminalise all sex work they should come out and say it," says Elvira Madrid of the combative NGO Brigada Callejera (Street Brigade), which works with prostitutes in the capital. "Trafficking is one thing, sex work is another."

Another problem is that even well-directed stings in Mexico City rarely dismantle the much broader sex-trafficking networks often generated in other states where the authorities continue to turn a blind eye. It is a problem that some estimate sucks in thousands of women every year.

"At least where I come from, it is seen as a normal job," Pedro says of the collection of towns in the central state of Tlaxcala where he grew up, which are famed for producing pimps the way others produce artisans. Pedro, who was detained in a raid on a hotel in the capital in 2009, adds that the influence of pimps in his home state would almost certainly have protected him from facing justice.

Tlaxcala pimps dominate sexual slavery in the capital, as well as in several other Mexican cities – and the odd US one as well, including New York. And, according to Pedro, there are ever more of them. "When I was a boy, there were a few renowned local families involved," he says. "Now every young man seems to have a brand new car they couldn't have got through any other means."

Pedro became one of them 15 years ago, after a short stint working in a US factory as an illegal immigrant took the shine off the American dream. To get started, he sought out veterans who had retired and laundered their profits in a string of legal businesses while also keeping their oar in the old trade by initiating younger relatives and eager pupils like Pedro.

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MDG : More than 100 sex workers wear skeleton masks during a procession in Mexico City Sex workers in Mexico City don skeleton masks during a candlelit vigil for their deceased colleagues, many of whom were murdered. Photograph: Reuters

"They said it wasn't a game and that there would be lots of problems with the police and the girls, and with other pimps who might want to kill me or who I might have to kill. And they asked me if I was conscious of that," he recalls. "I said yes, but the truth was that I was 19 and not conscious of anything other than that I wanted to make money and this was the only option I had."

Pedro's pimping godfathers advised him on how to ensnare poor and lonely Mexican women, often from troubled families. They told him to limit his initial "investment" when going after potential targets to a week, in order to avoid wasting his time. They also played an active part in his first conquest, the one that started with a sweet. Posing as his uncles, they helped convince the girl's family that Pedro was a hard-working young man with good intentions. Once she was well and truly hooked, they helped him organise a move to the border city of Tijuana, where they ran hotels. Even so, it was up to Pedro to cajole her into prostitution in the name of paying off a debt, while keeping the dream of a wedding and future happiness alive.

That was in 2000. When he was arrested nine years later, she was still seeing dozens of clients every day, entirely for his profit. By then, Pedro says, he had entrapped about 30 women in similar ways, and usually had six working for him at the same time – each earning $300-$400 a day. "I never had any problem activating my girls," he boasts, before giving a lesson in the language of trafficking that labels women as "furniture" and "merchandise", and talks about new recruits as "fresh meat for the lions".

He never gave his women any of their earnings, though he insists he sometimes took them to dinner or to the cinema and reserved violence for extreme circumstances such as an escape. "I knew lots of pimps who drugged and beat their women all the time," he says. "I knew pimps who kept them near starved and kept their children hostage, but that wasn't the school I was taught in."

This was the nightmare that Veronica lived for years. She met her pimp while working in a brothel just outside Mexico City when she was 15. He approached her as a client, treating her with a kindness she had never known, and promising to take her away to a life of love and security. By the time she discovered that his family owned brothels in the state of Michoacán, where she was expected to work, it was too late.

"They are all the same. They talk to you nicely and they treat you well at first because they see the profit in you," she says. "They look over your face and your body and have sex with you to see if you have potential, and then they start with their rap about how pretty you are and little by little you are pulled in. And when you fall, you are stuck."

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MDG: A former prostitute wears a piñata as a hat during Christmas celebrations in Mexico City A former prostitute wears a piñata as a hat during Christmas celebrations at Casa Xochiquetzal, a shelter for sex workers, in Mexico City. Tlaxcala pimps dominate sexual slavery in the capital. Photograph: Reuters

Things got even worse for Veronica after a failed escape attempt prompted her pimp to move her to the capital, where she was allowed only an hour's sleep a day between seeing about 40 clients. The pimp's fear that a rival was trying to steal Veronica, or the merest hint of insubordination, prompted vicious beatings. But, Veronica says, what really kept her in line was his family's control of her two children, whom they rarely allowed her to see. Eventually Veronica did escape, with the help of the activists from Brigada Callejera, who also helped her snatch back her daughter in a daring raid on her pimp's family home. "I tried to save my son but couldn't," she says. "Maybe they will tie him to the business as well. That's the way they do it, the father passing the title to the son."

Veronica laid low for a while until, penniless and with no education, she returned to prostitution, though at least she was keeping her earnings. A few months ago her trained eye spotted an obvious pimp honing in on her daughter, and the terror came flooding back. "For the first time I told her everything that had happened to me, to make her understand what she was getting herself into," says Veronica, who took her daughter into semi-hiding.

Veronica's pimp was not from Tlaxcala, and nor was the man hitting on her daughter. According to Pedro, this shows that while Tlaxcala pimps may abound, they are not particularly territorial. After all, the supply of vulnerable young women in Mexico can seem close to endless. "This is a free market," he says. "As long as you don't steal another pimp's girls there is no problem."

Pedro insists he is a reformed character with no intention of returning to the business when he is released from jail in a few years, though his expressions of regret appear to be tinged with nostalgia. "I am sorry I hurt them. Sorry I broke their dreams and illusions," he says at one point. "It was really easy for me," he muses at another, a discreet smile at the memory just visible on his lips.

Source: Guardian UK.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2014 10:04 am 
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The Striking Muxe: Mexico's Third Gender
1 April 2014
By Andrew Belonsky

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A muxe and friends after Mass on the second day of the vela, a celebration of muxe culture. Photography by Erin Lee Holland

Like their Native American Two-Spirit sisters to the north, the muxes are an integral part of Zapotec culture, revered, not reviled.

The first thing most people notice about muxes (pronounced MOO-shay) is that they appear to be men dressed as women. Some have had their breasts enhanced, others have nose jobs. But most wear long hair, dresses, and some makeup.

The majority of muxes start young, in their teens, and are trained in womanly ways by family and friends, taking their place in a Zapotec cultural tradition that predates the Spanish colonizers. Now their traditional role has become that of caretaker. “Sons and daughters get married and have families of their own, so the person that stays to care for the parents is the muxe,” explains Pedro Martinez Linares, a well-known muxe who began his training at age 13. “That’s why they are so highly valued.”

Like their Two-Spirit sisters to the north, the muxes are an integral part of Zapotec culture, revered, not reviled. And like other third gender people, muxes are not gay. Some take male lovers, others take wives. And they’re not transgender. They are distinct. Nor do all muxes work solely as women. Many take more “manly” career tracks: one muxe, Amaranta Gómez Regalado, ran for Mexico’s congress in 2003. And despite the popular description, not all muxes dress as women. Those are just the vestidas. There are also pintadas, the less common muxes who wear men’s clothing and makeup. And both come together each year for the muxes’ annual pageant, the four-day long La Vela de las Auténticas Intrépidas Buscadoras del Peligró, which translates to “The Celebration of the Bold Seekers of Danger.”

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The 2013 mayordomo (left) with family members posing for photos at La Misa.

The vela began nearly four decades ago as a friendly celebration, says Linares. “It all started as a small party, something like a reunion with only six or seven muxes who were already nearing old age,” he explains. “Every year they would celebrate the life they shared together... but you know how it goes. One invited friends, then the others invited their friends and it began growing that way.”

Today over 5,000 people come to where it all began, Juchitán, Oaxaca, for the massive celebration. But now the focus at this “beauty pageant” isn’t on poise, grace, or faces. It’s on wallets. You don’t so much earn the crown as buy it.

SLIDESHOW: PHOTOS OF MUXES AT LA VELA

“To be the mayordomo, you have to have the desire, but above all you have to have the money,” says Linares. The mayordomo honor runs around 60,000 pesos (around $4,400), while the queen’s crown costs about 100,000 pesos ($7,400).

As pecuniary as the modern-day festival’s politics may be, the result of the pagent is loftier: a celebration of a tradition that survived Spanish conquistadores, Catholic crusaders, communist revolutionaries, and the rise of Mexico’s machismo culture. And they even have the local church’s respect; it hosts a Mass during the vela, and many of the muxes attend.

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Guests at the vela celebration where the new queen and mayordomo are crowned.

Source: Out.

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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 3:08 pm 
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Gay couple arrested, fined for kissing in Mexico
22 April 2014
By Joe Morgan

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Mexican cops abused a gay couple, bundled them into a police van and fined them – just for sharing a kiss.

Jorge, 24, and Alan, 26, were accused of ‘disturbing the peace’ by officers as they kissed on a street corner at around 10pm in La Paz on Sunday (20 April). The couple claims an officer approached them, called them a homophobic slur, and ordered them to come with him to a police station. When they refused, the policeman allegedly ‘violently’ forced them into a van and held them at the station for a few hours.

They were released after paying a fine of 300 pesos each ($23, €17). ‘While we know of other cases, this is the first time something like this has happened to us,’ Jorge said, according to local media. ‘Yes, people have shouted ugly things before, but we have never bothered the authorities. We were terrified. The officers who arrested us were homophobic, corrupt liars. We never bothered the public order.’

La Paz police have not responded to the couple’s accusations. Following hearing the news of the arrest, the local LGBTI group has organized a kiss protest on 17 May - the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia.

Mexico has seen LGBTI rights progress in recent years. In 2001, a federal law was passed banning discrimination based on sexual orientation. Same-sex marriage has since been recognized in various states, including the capital of Mexico City.

Source: GayStarNews.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 10:37 am 
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Thousands March in Mexico City’s Gay Pride Parade
29 June 2014

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MEXICO CITY (Efe) – Thousands of people took part this weekend in the 36th Gay-Lesbian Pride and Dignity March in Mexico City, where about four dozen floats accompanied by marchers wound their way through downtown avenues to the Zocalo, the capital’s largest plaza, for a concert, officials said.

Nearly 1,900 police officers provided security on Saturday for the event. About 12,000 people participated in the march, which started at the Angel of Independence monument on Paseo de la Reforma, police said.

The marchers made a stop in front of the Senate to protest the creation of the Family and Human Development Committee. Sen. Jose Maria Martinez, a member of the conservative National Action Party (PAN) and the committee’s chairman, has criticized same-sex marriages. The marchers called for equality in marriage rights, an end to homophobia and respect for sexual diversity.

Grassroots groups and some businesses set up booths for artistic and cultural events, and singer Gabriela Spanic performed for the crowd.

Source: Efe via Latin American Herald Tribune.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2014 5:28 am 
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Northern Mexico state approves same-sex marriage
2 September 2014

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- The northern state of Coahuila has become the second place in Mexico after the capital to recognize same-sex marriage.

State lawmaker Samuel Acevedo said Tuesday he presented the bill that was voted into law because he wants gay couples to have the same rights of straight couples. The state of Coahuila on the border with Texas began allowing same-sex civil unions in 2007, but gay couples couldn't adopt children or get social security. Acevedo said that the law approved on Monday will help "fight discrimination."

Currently, the only place in Mexico where same-sex marriage is legal is Mexico City, where a same-sex marriage law was enacted in 2010.

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 7:19 pm 
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Mexican city allows same-sex wedding after long fight
17 January 2015

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Victor Fernando Urias Amparo and Victor Manuel Aguirre Espinoza exchange rings Saturday in Baja California's first same-sex wedding in Mexicali.
(Photo: Jorge Galindo Molina, La Cronica)

MEXICALI, Mexico (AP) -- The first same-sex marriage was held Saturday in this city on the border with California, after officials ended an 18-month fight that led to a Mexican Supreme Court order to permit the wedding, a lawyer for the couple said.

Attorney Jose Luis Marquez Saavedra had filed a complaint Friday against Mexicali officials after authorities again blocked the marriage despite the high court ruling. The lawyer said the city let Victor Fernando Urias Amparo and Victor Manuel Aguirre Espinoza wed Saturday and he expressed satisfaction that their rights had been upheld. Urias also said he was satisfied the marriage had been allowed to go forward, telling local reporters that the case showed that "when people work together, this works."

Mexican federal courts have issued rulings sympathetic to same-sex marriage, but for the most part that has not translated into legalization at the local level. The country does not have a single national civil code but rather one each for the 31 states and the Federal District of Mexico City. Thirty of those entities, including Baja California state, where Mexicali is, do not allow same-sex marriage. Only the capital and the northern state of Coahuila permit such unions.

When Urias and Aguirre first tried to marry in Mexicali in 2013, the local Civil Registry rejected them, saying Mexico's constitution recognizes only unions of opposite-sex couples. They then went to the Supreme Court and got an injunction authorizing their nuptials. Civil Registry officials rejected their petition again, saying bureaucratic procedures had not been followed. On a third try in November, the registry said the couple had failed to attend mandatory pre-marriage counseling. Then this month, City Hall told them they couldn't attend those sessions. Saavedra then filed his complaint Friday accusing the mayor, two municipal workers and a state employee of failing to fulfill their public duties.

In Latin America, Argentina and Uruguay are the only countries that recognize same-sex marriages. Fifteen other nations around the world also have legalized such unions.

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2015 6:10 pm 
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Gays hail Mexico court's marriage ruling
June 15, 2015

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Gays hail Mexico court's marriage ruling

Mexico City (AFP) - Mexico's gay and lesbian community is celebrating a key ruling by the Supreme Court that opens the door to same-sex marriage throughout the country.

The top court's decision brings Mexico closer to a small group of Latin American nations -- Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay -- that allow gay marriage.

The ruling, which was quietly issued on June 3 and only became known on Friday, says that it is unconstitutional for Mexican states to ban same-sex marriage. While the "jurisprudence" issued by the court does not oblige states to change their laws, it requires courts to rule in favor of same-sex couples whose marriages were rejected.

"It is a very important step forward for us because it involves access to rights and it's a decision that paves the way for a cultural change, for diverse families to be more visible," Tania Leon, a member of the Fundacion Arcoiris gay rights group, told AFP. "There is still much to do," Leon said, because gays and lesbian still the targets of discrimination.

Mexico City made history when it legalized same-sex marriage in 2007. It was followed by the states of Quintana Roo and Coahuila, but Mexico's 29 other federal entities define marriage as a union between a man and a woman. The Supreme Court ruled: "Seeking to link the requirements for marriage to sexual preference... to procreation is discriminatory, because it unjustifiably excludes from marriage homosexual couples that are in similar condition as heterosexual couples."

The nation's top tribunal has chipped away at laws banning gay marriage in recent years. A previous ruling allowed gays and lesbians to ask courts to recognize their marriages. The latest decree orders judges to automatically rule in favor of same-sex couples. The governmental National Council to Prevent Discrimination hailed the ruling as "a historic step in recognizing the rights of the sexually diverse community."

Source: Yahoo! AFP.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2015 8:39 pm 
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Acapulco holds mass gay wedding on beach
By Allan Garcia
10 July 2015

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A gay couple takes part in the first same-sex mass wedding in Acapulco, Guerrero State, Mexico on July 10, 2015 (AFP Photo/Pedro Pardo)

Acapulco, Mexico (AFP) - Twenty gay and lesbian couples got married in a mass wedding on an Acapulco beach on Friday, one month after Mexico's top court all but legalized same-sex marriage nationwide.

With Guerrero state's governor and wife as witnesses, the 15 male and five female couples exchanged vows as the sun set, surrounded by some 200 people in a celebration that included cake and a mariachi band. "It's a big step. It's something I have always wanted since I was very little and I wanted to start a family," said Alejandra Jimenez Soler after she married a hotel worker whom she had been dating for more than year. Holding a bouquet of roses, the 17-year-old Acapulco resident was among the youngest people to get married.

Despite her youth, Jimenez said she took a "responsible, mature, reasoned" decision in the face of her family's disappointment with her homosexuality. "I feel terrible that my family isn't here to support me because they should accept you as you are," she said. Under the theme of "Guerrero, to love is a right," the mass ceremony was sealed with a toast, a wedding cake and kisses as the mariachis played cheerful music.

image
Twenty gay and lesbian couples have married in a mass wedding on an Acapulco beach, one month after Mexico's top court all but legalized same-sex marriage nationwide (AFP Photo/Pedro Pardo)

Civil right

Governor Rogelio Ortega promoted the mass wedding despite opposition from some politicians and the Roman Catholic church. Mexico's expansion of gay marriage -- it was already legal in Mexico City and two of 31 states -- preceded a US Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex unions throughout the United States.

Mexico's top court opened the door to same-sex marriage through the country of nearly 120 million people on June 3, when it ruled that it was unconstitutional for states to ban them. While the "jurisprudence" issued by the court does not oblige states to change their laws, it requires courts to rule in favor of same-sex couples whose marriages were rejected.

Following the ruling, Ortega's administration instructed civil registries to approve gay marriage licenses. Acapulco's mayor tried to block same-sex marriages, arguing that the local civil code must be amended first. But the civil registry went along with the governor's orders and approved Friday's marriage licenses. "We respect all beliefs because we are inclusive when it comes to civil rights," Ortega said during the ceremony.

Mexico City was the first jurisdiction in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage in 2010. Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay have since made gay marriage legal, too, while religiously conservative Chile approved same-sex civil unions this year.

Source: Yahoo! AFP

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2016 12:47 pm 
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Mexicans march for gay marriage, day after opponents rally
11 September 2016

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Hundreds of gay and lesbian rights supporters marched to Mexico City's Metropolitan Cathedral to support same-sex marriage Sunday, one day after thousands marched against it.

Sunday's demonstrators carried a banner reading "We are families too" and placards reading "I respect your family, respect mine." A day earlier, marches were held in several Mexican cities opposing same-sex marriage. White-clad demonstrators Saturday chanted "Children need a father and a mother!" and "Wake up and defend the family."

In May, President Enrique Pena Nieto proposed legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. It is currently legal only in some places such as Mexico City, the northern state of Coahuila and Quintana Roo state on the Caribbean coast. Pena Nieto's party suffered losses in midterm elections in June and has largely sat on the initiative since then.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:59 am 
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Mexico congressional committee nixes same-sex marriage bill
By PETER ORSI
9 November 2016

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- A committee in Mexico's lower house of congress on Wednesday rejected a proposal by President Enrique Pena Nieto for legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide, an idea that sparked big demonstrations by both supporters and opponents.

The measure on enshrining same-sex couples' right to wed in the constitution was defeated 19-8, with one abstention, in the Commission on Constitutional Matters. Commission chairman Edgar Castillo Martinez said the vote means the matter is "totally and definitively concluded," according to a summary published online by the Chamber of Deputies.

Mexico's Supreme Court ruled last year that it was unconstitutional for states to bar same-sex marriage. But the decision did not have the effect of overturning or rewriting any laws on the books, meaning individual couples still have to sue in each case for the right to wed. Same-sex marriage has been formally legalized only in some jurisdictions, such as Mexico City, the northern state of Coahuila and Quintana Roo state on the Caribbean coast.

Pena Nieto's proposal in May would have codified the principles of the Supreme Court ruling in the constitution and extended the right to all of Mexico. The president's political party suffered big setbacks in midterm elections in June, and largely sat on the issue afterward. Lawmaker Guadalupe Acosta Naranjo of the leftist Democratic Revolution Party blamed political calculations for the defeat of the measure. "A reform of which we should feel proud," Acosta said, according to the transcript. "Because the rights of minorities are not put to a vote. They are expanded and recognized, and it is congress that should protect them."

Candido Ochoa Rojas of the Green Party, which is allied with Pena Nieto's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, said he was voting against the measure due to constitutional conflicts and because marriage is governed by state civil codes. "How will it bolster the family if the preamble says that procreation is not a decisive element of marriage?" Ochoa said.

Source: AP

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