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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 7:35 pm 
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Mexican Cyclists Bare It All to Demand Respect on the Road
13 June 2011



MEXICO CITY — The World Naked Bike Ride, or WNBR, a clothing-optional cycling event, drew hundreds of participants over the weekend in Mexico, where cyclists demanded respect on the road and called for expanded use of bicycles as an environmentally friendly mode of transportation.

WNBR participants took to the streets of Mexico City, Guadalajara and Morelia on Saturday, with some riders completely naked and others in their underwear.

Many riders arrived early, using the time to apply body paint and make signs. "We came naked because that"s how we are in traffic, fragile and defenseless because drivers constantly violate our rights on the road," cyclist Marco Delgado told Efe.

The cyclists also wanted to promote the benefits of bicycle use for the environment and health, and they sought to send a message about the need to cut the consumption of fossil fuels. About 1,300 people participated in the event, according to Mexico City police, while organizers said only 624 riders registered.

The WNBR, which made its debut in 2003 in Vancouver, Canada, has been held in 70 cities in 20 countries, with cyclists hitting the road on the second Saturday of June to get their message across.

Source: latin American Herald Tribune / EFE.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 3:11 am 
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Same-Sex Marriages Legal in Cancun
By Diane Anderson-Minshall
1 January 2012

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Gay travelers just got another reason to head to the Caribbean.

According to Fox News Latino, Cancun, Cozumel, and other resort areas in the Mexican Caribbean will soon allow same-sex couples to legally marry, thanks largely to a recently discovered quirk in the local civil code.

The area is already popular with LGBT travelers from the U.S., Europe, Canada, and other parts of Mexico, and several couples have already expressed interest in marrying there. Activist Patricia Novelo told the Spanish language news site Efe.com that the first same-sex group weddings will be held in the resort area this month. The International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association is working with Colectivo Diversidad, Fusion G, and Gay Tours Mexico to strike up deals with airlines and hotel chains so that same-sex weddings can be held all along Mexico's Caribbean coast.

According to Fox News Latino, same-sex marriages are possible in the region of Mexico known as Quintana Roo, "thanks to a legal gap in the Civil Code," which speaks only to "people interested in getting married" without specifying their gender.

Mexico City already has legal same-sex marriage; over 1,200 same-sex couples have married there so far.

Source: Advocate.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2012 7:51 am 
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Agnes Hernandez, Mexican Transgender Activist, Brutally Murdered
15 March 2012

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Murdered transgender activist: Agnes Torres Hernández

Nearly 2000 individuals congregated outside a civic plaza in Puebla, Mexico on Tuesday, demanding justice for slain Mexican transgender activist Agnés Torres Hernández, whose body was found on Friday by neighbors who reported the crime to local police.

Mexican Attorney General is considering the investigation of Torres' murder as a hate crime, according to the newspaper El Universal (in Spanish).

She was last seen on Friday night when she left her home to attend a party in Chipilo, a small town in the state of Puebla. She was found clothed only in underwear, a blouse with suspenders and a brown jacket on Saturday in a ditch outside the city of Puebla. Her throat had been slashed and there were several burn marks across her body.

Torres, a 28 year-old psychologist and educator, is remembered as an activist and ardent defender of human rights in Mexico's LBGT community. She was an important figure in the strive for acceptance for the transgender community in her native country. News of her death quickly spread on Twitter under the hashtag #AgnesTorres. Family, friends and members of the LGBT community attended her burial in the city of Tehuacán on Tuesday morning.

Torres’ death adds to a series of violent acts against the LGBT community in Puebla that have been happening since January. “It's the sixth crime this year against members of the LGBT community and none of them have been resolved," said Brahim Zamora, a representative of the organization "Democracia y Sexualidad" (Demysex) ("Democracy and Sexuality") to CNN Mexico. The murder case of Jorge Roberto Macip, 47, was also reported this past weekend. His body was found in his own house by his partner. Ninety-five percent of Macip's body was burnt.

These tragic deaths can be attributed to the prejudice that still exists in the country, according to José Ángel Aguilar Gil, national coordinator of Demysex. "It's another homophobic crime," he said to CNN Mexico.

Source: Huffington Post.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2012 7:51 am 
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Suspected murderers of transgender activist arrested
19 March 2012

The Puebla state authorities have released the identities of the four adults and one minor charged with the murder of the transgender activist Agnes Torres Hernández, whose body was found in the municipality of Atlixco on Saturday 10 March. The official account, corroborated by the suspects, suggests that they committed the crime in order to steal her car.

Torres Hernández, 28, was a psychologist and educator, and a beloved activist for human rights and the equality of Mexico’s LGBT community. According to San Diego LGBT weekly, her death is only a part of other violent acts against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in Puebla since January.

The four adults arrested on suspicion of her murder were: Luis Fernando Buenos Mazzocco, Jorge y Agustín Flores Zechinelli, both 18 years old, Marco Antonio Berra Espezia, 19; while Jorge Flores Zechinelli, also 19, has confessed to the crime. The fifth suspect, a minor, was put under the control of the agent of the Public Ministry for Justice for Adolescents. It is thought likely that he will be convicted of qualified homicide. In Puebla, the punishment for this act can reach from 22 to 30 years in prison.

The authorities confirmed that, despite the arrest of the presumed criminals and the discovery of the victim’s vehicle, investigations into alternative motives will continue. It is thought that the suspects decided to burn Torres Hernández’s car in order not to leave any traces. The car was found last Wednesday in Tepango, Altixco.

The Puebla public prosecutor tweeted that the possibility the murder was a hate crime has not been disregarded. Questions about the likelihood that the motive was robbery have been raised since details about the marks of extreme violence found on the victim’s body, including burns and a neck injury, were released.

The detainees claimed to have met Torres Hernández a month and a half ago and, in order to steal a car, decided to trick her by inviting her to a party on the ranch where they work. This was the reason why she had come, voluntarily, to be at their property in Chipilo. However, activists and members of the LGBT have questioned the romantic relationship that the victim had with one of the suspects.

Brahima Zamora, president of the Democracy and Sexuality network, who was president at the press conference in which the suspects were identified, said that the advances made in the case had been extraordinary and that it had made a great social impact at a national level.

Finally, Fernando Manzanilla Prieto, secretary general of government, said that the state administration had taken a firm step forward to counter impunity and in favour of the respect for the dignity of all humans, particularly in ensuring that the rights of those of sexual diversity are respected in Puebla state.

Source: Pulsamerica UK.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 2:51 am 
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Mexico ruling party candidate floats new vote ploy: sex
18 June 2012

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Josefina Vazquez Mota, presidential candidate for the ruling National Action Party (PAN), shows an ''X'' on the palm of her hand to remind supporters how to cast their vote during a rally in Atlixco, in the Mexican state of Puebla June 18, 2012. REUTERS/Imelda Medina

(Reuters) - Sex sells - at least that's what the ruling party candidate is hoping as she seeks to rescue her fading chances in Mexico's upcoming presidential election.

Sitting well behind the frontrunner, Josefina Vazquez Mota of the National Action Party (PAN) has appealed to women voters to use their wiles to ensure their husbands vote on July 1. First she urged them on her Twitter account to withhold "cuchi cuchi", or hanky panky, for a month if the husbands don't vote. Then, challenged by a disgruntled man, she upped the ante on Monday.

"Today a man wrote to me and said: Josefina, why the negative? What's the prize? Why not a month without hanky panky for those who don't come out to vote, and double rations for those who do?" the conservative, usually serious Vazquez Mota told a rally in the city of Atlixco, in the state of Puebla. "If the woman wants to, that depends on each individual. But the thing here is we all take part (in the vote)," she added.

Support for the conservative PAN has been hurt by a mounting death toll in the government's war on drug cartels, and a failure to create enough jobs for the growing population. Most polls place Vazquez Mota in third in the race, well over 10 points behind front-runner Enrique Pena Nieto of the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).

(Reporting by Martha Alicia Villela; Writing by Simon Gardner; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)
Source: Reuters.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 5:19 pm 
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Public smooching arrest prompts Mexico 'kiss-in'
6 August 2012

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A Mexican couple kisses at the Zocalo Square in Mexico City on Valentine's Day 2009.

AFP - Couples of all ages locked lips outside a church in the conservative central Mexico city of Leon to protest the arrest of a man for kissing his female companion.

The "kiss-in" -- held at noon on Sunday to coincide with mass -- received applause from some parishioners at the Catholic church.

Manuel Berumen, a 38-year-old university lecturer, was detained for 12 hours for engaging in the public display of affection while strolling Thursday in a nearby square with his partner and their four-year-old son.

"I took Mayra and kissed her, nothing out of the ordinary. And then we heard a person screaming: 'There are children here -- children!' as if we were naked or engaging in pornography on the street," Berumen told reporters Monday after filing a complaint to the country's human rights advocacy agency.

He and his partner were charged with offenses against morality by a local judge, who imposed the 12-hour detention, though Berumen said the five police officers responding to the scandalized woman's call arrested only him.

The state of Guanajuato, whose capital is Leon, is considered one of Mexico's most conservative. There have been similar incidents there arising from alleged "breaches of morality."

Source: france24.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:58 pm 
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Mexico's top court: Anti-gay terms are hate speech
7 March 2013
By OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ

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Gay Pride Mexico City 2012

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Mexico's Supreme Court has ruled that two anti-gay words commonly used in Mexico are hate speech and not protected as freedom of expression under the country's constitution, allowing those offended by them to sue for moral damages.

The magistrates voted 3-2 late Wednesday in favor of a journalist from the central city of Puebla who in 2010 sued a reporter at a different newspaper who had written a column referring to him as "punal" and others at the plaintiff's newspaper as "maricones." Both words roughly translate into "faggot."

The majority said the terms are offensive and discriminatory. "Even though they are deeply rooted expressions in Mexican society, the fact is that the practices of the majority of society can't validate the violations of basic right," their opinion said.

The resolution was praised by the Mexican gay and lesbian community and anti-discrimination activists as a step forward in the fight for equality in this conservative country rife with machismo. But others criticized it as ridiculous, saying many other words would have to be added, including some used to offend poor people in a society excessively concerned with social status. "The historic resolution ... marks the first precedent in the discussion of the limits of freedom of expression versus the right to non-discrimination," said the country's National Council to Prevent Discrimination.

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Mexican beaches are a regular for gay tourists and their travel agents

Alejandro Brito, director of Letter S, a gay rights group, said that the resolution will lead to a more respectful way of referring to gay people but that it falls short of having an impact on the mentality of anti-gay Mexicans. "This will inhibit the use of the words in public forums and the media, and that's very positive," Brito said. "But this doesn't mean that the person who stops saying these words will stop being homophobic."

Gay rights have made some advances in Mexico, with the Supreme Court ruling in favor of gay couples adopting and requiring that same-sex marriages performed in Mexico City be recognized in the rest of the country. Mexico City's groundbreaking same-sex marriage law, enacted in 2010, extends to wedded gay couples the right to adopt children, to jointly apply for bank loans, to inherit wealth and to be covered by their spouses' insurance policies. The capital's annual gay pride parade draws tens of thousands of people, and in some neighborhoods gays openly hold hands.

But discrimination and violence against gay people remains a problem, despite campaigns against intolerance. Violence against gays has increased over the past few years as more people go public about their sexual orientation, according to a report released by Brito's group in 2010. Mexico City had the most killings of gay people in Mexico, with 144 between 1995 and 2009, according to the report.

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:58 pm 
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Well done. :)

And here are a 'few' more words that should be banned alongside the above-mentioned:

- Puto
- Lilo
- Joto
- Marica
- Mariquita
- Mariposón
- Sidral
- Loca
- Invertido
- Mayate
- Vestido
- Jarocha

And some more :
- Personas con gustos raros
- Sodomita

Correct terms and words to sue are:
- Gay
- Lesbiana
- Persona (s) con diversidad sexual
- Persona homosexual
- Travesti
- Transexual
- Persona que cambió de sexo

:capwave: :smile:

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:07 pm 
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Mexico's young LGBT women take a stand at lesbian march
March 20, 2013
By Mayela Sanchez

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Young women accounted for the majority of participants in the sixth lesbian march in Mexico City last weekend. Mayela Sanchez (GPI)

MEXICO CITY [GPI] -- “There is no political liberty if there is no sexual liberty!” women chanted on Saturday at the 6ª Marcha Lésbica 2013 in Mexico City, the capital of Mexico.

Women gathered on March 16 for the biennial lesbian march under a sky full of gray clouds that at times threatened to rain. They started at the Zócalo, the main public square in the city’s historical center, then marched nearly two miles to the Monumento a la Revolución.

The Comité Organizador de la Marcha Lésbica organizes the event only every two years because of funding constraints. The march draws support from 14 other lesbian organizations from various states across the country.

Between 5,000 and 7,000 people attended the march this year, says Mariana Pérez Ocaña, general coordinator of COMAL and editor of LeSVOZ, a lesbian feminist culture magazine. Many women marched with their partners, while some participated with their families. Several men joined as well. But most participants were young women. “They are the population we reach,” Pérez Ocaña says, “and they are involved, informed.”

Two of these young women were girlfriends Ana Gabriela and Estrella, both 18. They said this was the first time they had attended a lesbian march. Although Mexico City hosts a gay pride march each year, COMAL has been hosting a separate lesbian march since 2003. It takes place during March to coincide with International Women's Day. The lesbian feminist movement here has distanced itself from the gay pride march, which members say doesn’t represent the issues important to them. “It has become a carnival of naked men and transvestites without any social demand,” Pérez Ocaña says of the gay pride march.

A march solely for lesbians aims to create visibility about the issues that distinctly concern them. Pérez Ocaña says lesbians face double discrimination in society – for both their sex and their sexuality. The political character of the march surfaced in the slogans the participants chanted, such as, “Not one more murder!”

The participants’ political demands included an end to violence against all women, the nationwide legalization of same-sex marriage and abortion and increased punishment for crimes when committed on the basis of sexuality. Laws governing same-sex marriage and abortion vary by state in Mexico.

As part of the march’s denouncement of violence, organizers have expressed solidarity for the past three marches with Nuestras Hijas de Regreso a Casa, a civil association comprising relatives of young women who have gone missing in Ciudad Juárez, a city in northern Mexico that has gained notoriety for incidents of feminicide.

March participants wielded purple flags, the color that represents the lesbian community. But unlike the gay pride march, there were no costumes or festive energy. Some women called for more freedom to express themselves during the lesbian march, though. A few young women walked bare-chested, including Lucía, a 21-year old-lesbian from France who lives in Mexico.

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Lucía, a 21-year-old lesbian from France, bares her breasts and torso as a way of expressing her right to decide.

Lucía says that French and Mexican societies still don’t accept lesbians. So she bared her breasts and torso during the march as a way of expressing her right to decide. But COMAL members tried to remove Lucía and another woman when they advanced to the front of the march to kiss. “It is a contradiction,” Lucía says. She says that if the march aims to defend lesbians’ rights and freedom, then organizers in the future should not prevent participants from going shirtless or kissing in public.

Read the rest of the story at GlobalPressInstitute.org

Source: GPI via UPI.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 12:27 pm 
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Gay Mexican men would change lifestyle to reduce HIV risk for $288 a year
by Corinne Pinfold
6 February 2013

A study in Mexico has attempted to put an exact price on how much gay and bisexual men would have to be paid to change behaviours that put them at high risk of HIV.

The study, published in the European Journal of Health Economics, focussed on two sections of the population with particularly high prevalence of HIV infection: young gay men (estimated 20% HIV-positive) and male sex workers (estimated 30% HIV-positive).

The questionnaire revealed that for $288 (£180) per year, three quarters of those questioned would be willing to attend monthly talks on STI prevention, be regularly tested, and pledge to stay STI-free. The Mexican government’s health care offers HIV treatment universally, at a cost of $5,000 to $7,000 (£3,200 – £4,500) per year.

Omar Galárraga, assistant professor of health services policy and practice and lead author of the study, said: ”We’re trying to prevent HIV from spreading and we are trying to save money. We want to make sure that every dollar spent has the greatest impact.”

Mr Galárraga administered questionnaires to 1,745 men who fit those demographics. He used small hand-held computers to carry out the 40-minute long questionnaires in locations like clubs and red light districts. The computers made it appear that participants were simply texting, allowing them to discreetly take part in the study.

For the 5.1% of the male respondents who were sex workers the price was lower, around $156 (£100) per year. “The target population seems generally very well-disposed to participate in these types of programs at prices which are consistent with other social programs currently in place in Mexico for preventing other health risks,” said Mr Galárraga. He said that sex workers may have a more urgent need for money, hence the lower sum required to get them involved, and said that if they participated the money would compensate for the clients they might lose if they started requiring condom use during sex.

Since gathering the results of the study a pilot scheme for those willing to change their lifestyle to reduce risk has been launched, with 200 men participating. Similar schemes which pay at-risk individuals to adopt safer behaviours have already been put to use in Mexico improving paediatric health care, as well as combating STIs in Malawi and Tanzania.

Source: PinkNews.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 6:02 pm 
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Indigenous gays celebrate traditions in Mexico
3 July 2013

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In this June 29, 2013 photo, Thanya Mimosa, a muxe, prepares her outfit before attending a gathering of muxes in Mexico City. Muxes, (pronounced MOO-shays), as Zapotec indigenous men who dress and behave in ways associated with women are known, gathered for a "vela," as community parties are called in Juchitan, in the southern state of Oaxaca, to share their traditions with others in the capital. Most donned Tehuana dresses, popularized around the world by Mexican artist Friday Kahlo, and many wore traditional large gold earrings and necklaces and a "resplandor," a headdress made from a starched veil placed around the face that creates a type of halo. (AP Photo/Gabriela Sanchez)

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Wearing a long skirt, headdress and loose blouse embroidered with bright flowers, Mariana de la Noche road on a float in Mexico City's recent gay pride parade.

The float was for "muxes," Zapotec indigenous men who dress and behave in ways associated with women. The 33-year-old restaurant cook was picked as queen of the "muxes" (pronounced MOO-shays) living in Mexico City, where for the first time Saturday they celebrated a "vela," as community parties are known in their hometown of Juchitan, a city of Zapotecs in the southern state of Oaxaca.

Gay men, transvestites and transgender people are generally accepted in Juchitan and often work as home helpers, embroiderers, decorators, cooks and entertainers.

Like Mariana, most of the muxes at her crowning wore Tehuana dresses from the Juchitan area, popularized around the world by Mexican artist Friday Kahlo, along with the region's traditional large gold earrings and necklaces and "resplandor," headdresses made from a starched veil worn around the face like a halo.

It was a party to have fun but also an opportunity to reaffirm the muxes' presence in the capital and celebrate their traditions from back home, said David Kelvin, who organized the event. "We want to bring the party here, but through the party we want to have a (message) about exercising our rights, of respect, of dignity, of culture," Kelvin said. The contact between muxes and the gay men from Mexico City has led to the fusion of urban and indigenous cultures, said Kelvin. The gathering was important "to rescue our culture, to rescue who we are and show the rest of the people in this city how we live our sexuality, how we exercise our rights," he said.



According to anthropological studies, some women in Juchitan encourage sons' muxe leanings because they tend to stay home and care for their parents rather than get married. "Muxes are a blessing from God because they look after you when you are sick more than a woman would," said Vicenta Toledo, who attended the party with her gay son. "They are a very important part of life."

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 1:01 pm 
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Mexico's 1st gay mayor elected in rough north
18 July 2013
By MARK STEVENSON

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In this image released by Benjamin Medrano Thursday, July 18, 2013, Benjamin Medrano, center, raises his arms with other unidentified people during a campaign event in Chichimequillas, Mexico, Friday, June 7, 2013. Medrano, the first openly gay mayor ever elected in Mexico, is scheduled to take office in the rough, violence-plagued state of Zacatecas in September. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Benjamin Medrano)

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Mexico's first openly gay elected mayor is set to take office in a rough part of Zacatecas state known for cowboy boots, embossed belts and drug gang shootouts.

Benjamin Medrano, a 47-year-old singer and gay bar-owner, says he is proud to be openly gay and rights groups say his victory in the city of Fresnillo's July 7 election marks a significant point in the fight for gay rights. They add that it is too early yet to declare victory and Medrano, who takes office in September, acknowledges that he was the target of a malicious phone-calling campaign in which his political rivals "tried to smear me, as if being gay were a crime."

Zacatecas is a largely rural state with a reputation for cowboy hats and macho swagger, one of last places in Mexico that seemed likely to elect a gay mayor.

"Somewhat? Very machisto, I would say," Medrano says of his region. "I am going to be mayor of a township (roughly equivalent to a U.S. county) where there are 258 villages full of tough country people, who don't necessarily have much information on what's happening elsewhere, and have even less of an automatic sympathy with their gay mayor. But," he notes," It's not like I'm going to paint city hall pink, either."

While some top Mexican legislators and mayors have been rumored to be gay, none has ever come out. "He is the first," said Alejandro Brito, director of "Letra S," one of Mexico's foremost gay rights groups. "There have been city officials and city council members, but openly gay mayors? No." He noted some gay legislators have won seats in congress, but not by winning any district race; rather, they won their seats through a proportional-representation scheme in which political parties designate them. "This shows that our human rights system is providing some protection," Brito said. "Because, even though there is no public majority in favor of electing gay politicians, he (Medrano) knows that the legal framework will protect him." "It is now more risky for a political rival to be openly homophobic, than it is to be a homosexual candidate," Brito said.

In recent years, a drug turf war has raged around Fresnillo, and bodies have been found hacked to bits, others with their throats slit, some decapitated, some stuffed in wells or shallow graves. Medrano campaigned on a strong public-safety platform, advocating cooperation with state and federal police, and vetting and background checks on the notoriously corrupt local police force. "I'm not at risk, because I don't have any relationship with any of the groups," Medrano said Thursday, referring to the two drug cartels - the Zetas and the Gulf Cartel - that are fighting for control of Fresnillo, a city of 230,000 that has the misfortune to sit on some of the main trafficking routes in northern Mexico. "Of course, I have the same fear that anybody who lives in Fresnillo has," Medrano said.

Several factors help explain his victory in this machista region. First is that Medrano is a singer, and the owner of a gay bar for 18 years. Singing is one of the areas where Mexico has readily accepted gays. "Given that I'm a singer, people know that aspect of me," Medrano said. The other factor is the way Medrano handles the political aspects of gay issues. He has attended gay rights marches, but he doesn't campaign on gay rights, and in fact doesn't agree with many of the movement's main demands.

A Roman Catholic, he says "I wish the church had a different view, but I cannot go against doctrine ... I respect my church, and I don't want to dig any deeper beyond what's permitted and what is appropriate. I'm not in favor of gay marriage, I don't share that view, because we are still very small town ... in short, we're not prepared, in my view," he said. "Not yet, anyway, because we have strong roots in our religion, and in our customs." But he criticizes gay politicians who refuse to come out, saying he's "very proud to be the first openly gay mayor in this country."

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:53 am 
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Famed Mexican gay couple helps blaze adoption trail
8 May 2013

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Jaime Morales (left) and Felipe Najera answers questions during an interview in Mexico City, on April 29, 2013.

AFP - They are perhaps Mexico's best-known gay couple: one a soap opera actor, the other a theater producer. They were happy enough just being together, until things got better and they could wed.

And while it has not been easy, even though they had the law on their side, now Felipe Najera and Jaime Morales are the predominantly Catholic country's first same-sex couple to be able to adopt a child through a public institution -- though others have adopted through private agencies. Their daughter Alejandra is a year-and-a-half old.

The sprawling metropolis of Mexico City legalized gay marriage in 2009, although the rest of the country has not yet done so. Morales, a 55-year-old architect turned theater producer, said when he and Najera saw all the work that lawmakers put into getting the law passed, they decided to get married and did so in 2010. "It was not something we needed. We were already an established couple. But we think that this struggle had to be reflected in an event," said Morales, who has been with 47-year-old Najera, a regular in the showbiz tabloid press, for 13 years.

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Mexican actor Felipe Najera holds his adopted daughter in Mexico City, on April 29, 2013.

But starting a family was not easy, even though the law says gay couples can adopt children. Najera said a lot of government agencies in Mexico City have nevertheless failed to update their rules and regulations to allow for the right to adoption. They hit nothing but roadblocks when they went to the DIF, a national program for arranging adoptions. So in 2012, they turned to the Mexico City attorney general's office and, after undergoing a thorough evaluation, were deemed fit to raise a child.

Najera, with a baby bottle in his hand while Alejandra played out in the yard, said authorities wanted to make sure he and Morales were psychologically fit and balanced. He challenged critics of the idea of two men raising a child, saying heterosexuals are not necessarily that good at it and, in fact, often fail. "All the children who are abandoned or awaiting adoption come from heterosexual relationships," he said.

Morales explained that he and his husband took people's prejudices into account in deciding whether to adopt a boy or a girl, before opting for the latter. "We thought a girl would have it easier than a boy adopted by two men. If the boy turns out to be gay, (people will say) we passed it on to him, or the really sick minds could even think that we might rape him," Morales said. "The world is changing but not that much," he added.

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Mexican actor Felipe Najera holds his daughter and pet dog during an interview with AFP in Mexico City, on April 29, 2013.

After gay marriage was approved in the Mexican capital, prosecutors with the federal government filed suit in the Supreme Court to try to have the law deemed unconstitutional. They failed. In fact, the court ruled that three couples that wanted to wed in the southern state of Oaxaca could do so, even though local law did not allow for it. That set a precedent for homosexuals anywhere in Mexico to be able to get married if they fight it out in court. Gay couples in five other Mexican states plan to use this route to wed, according to a lawyer who specializes in the issue.

But whatever the law may say, gay marriage does not in fact guarantee the same rights enjoyed by heterosexual couples in Mexico. For three years, Najera battled the national actors' union because it denies his husband and daughter the medical insurance it grants to spouses and kids of heterosexuals. In the end, the union was found to be discriminating against gays and it agreed just days ago to give the same rights to homosexuals as it does to its heterosexual members.

Advocates say more than 2,000 gay couples have wed, but only a dozen or so receive social security benefits. And they got those benefits by going to court and receiving rulings that are handed down on a case-by-case basis, with no blanket legal precedent established. So gay couples have to fight it out on their own. There are other hiccups as well: gay couples have trouble getting the same tax breaks as heterosexuals, or inheritance rights, or taking out a joint loan, or making medical decisions for a partner if he or she is incapacitated. Najera says he would love to perform in a soap opera addressing the problems of gays in Mexico but laughs and acknowledges: "I don't have the money to produce it."

Source: France24.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 4:23 pm 
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Mexican state approves same-sex civil unions
30 July 2013

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Lawmakers in Mexico's western state of Colima have approved a change in the state's constitution that legalizes same-sex civil unions.

Colima state spokeswoman Cecilia Ramirez says the legislature approved the constitutional change late Monday after seven of the state's 10 municipalities approved the reform. Ramirez says the law provides gay couples with numerous social benefits similar to those of married couples. She says a survey found Colima residents opposed instituting same-sex marriage but did support giving gay couples some legal rights.

Currently, Mexican same-sex marriages are allowed in Mexico City, the southern state of Oaxaca and the state of Quintana Roo, home to the resort city of Cancun. The northern state of Coahuila began allowing same-sex civil unions in 2007.

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 7:14 pm 
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Same-sex couples inch toward sharing benefits in Mexico City
May 21, 2013
By Mayela Sanchez

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MEXICO CITY (GPI) -- Lawyer Jaime López was diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2008. But he did not have health insurance to cover his treatment.

As a sole practitioner, López did not have access to any public social security services available in Mexico through its two social security agencies. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers these benefits to employees of private companies, and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado offers them to government employees.

David González, López’s partner of 10 years, had health insurance through IMSS and tried to enroll López as his beneficiary. But IMSS denied their request because they were not married. The laws governing the social security agencies extend benefits to only spouses and concubines. By that point, López had already had his left kidney surgically removed to prevent the cancer from spreading. Since 2008, he has been receiving medical care at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, a public hospital in Mexico City for people without social security. He must pay for services out of pocket.

López says he does not know how much money he has spent on his medical treatment. But he has had two operations and currently obtains medical consultations, which cost 400 pesos ($33), every six months. In March 2010, López and González became one of the first four couples to marry in Mexico City, only one week after the legalization of same-sex marriage took effect in the federal district. Once married, González again attempted to enroll López as a beneficiary. But IMSS denied them again – this time because the social security law governing the agency did not recognize same-sex marriage.

Since then, López has pushed for changes in legislation governing the IMSS and ISSSTE to recognize the right of same-sex couples to share social security benefits. On May 13, ISSSTE changed its internal policy to enable same-sex couples to register their spouses. But ultimately, it is up to Congress to revise the social security laws governing the agencies, the Ley del Seguro Social and the Ley del ISSSTE. López has been instrumental in legislation that the Chamber of Deputies has passed to enable same-sex couples to share benefits. He is currently working with senators to develop legislation that would clear both bodies.

Three years after same-sex marriage became legal in Mexico City, spouses are still not guaranteed access to each other’s benefits because of technicalities that have stalled proposals to modify the social security laws in Congress. Some couples have found alternative legal routes to obtain this right. ISSSTE changed its internal policy in May 2013, but the Senate is still developing its proposal to modify the social security laws. Meanwhile, legal experts and same-sex couples call on judges and society to broaden their definitions of marriage to prevent discrimination.

The Mexico City government recognized marriage between people of the same sex in December 2009. Since the legalization took effect in March 2010, more than 2,000 couples have married in the federal district, López says. But as López and González have learned, marriage does not carry equal rights for heterosexual and homosexual couples, such as the right to share social security benefits. Social security benefits in Mexico include health insurance, pensions, housing credits, child care and financial assistance for funerals.

Source: UPI.

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