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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2006 7:02 pm 
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This was posted in another topic, but as there is now a place for Latin American news, I am posting it here too.

Mexican capital legalizes same-sex civil unions

MEXICO CITY -- Mexico City legalized same-sex civil unions this week, the first such move in the country, amid strong objections by the Roman Catholic Church and conservative groups.

The Mexican capital became the second city in Latin America to grant legal recognition of homosexual couples, after Buenos Aires in Argentina. Titled "Cohabitation in Society," the measure allows two people of the same sex to enjoy the same legal rights and benefits allowed married couples, excluding the adoption of children. The bill will grant gay couples inheritance and pension rights, among other social benefits. The law allows same-sex couples to register their union with civil authorities.

The 66-seat municipal council approved the bill on a 43-17 vote, with five abstentions, setting off celebrations among its supporters.

"All that's left is for the mayor of Mexico City, Alejandro Encinas, to sign it into law and he has already said he would," Daniel Salazar, a council lawmaker for the leftist Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD), said. He predicted the first gay civil unions would be recognized before the end of the year.

Only the municipal council members of the Catholic conservative National Action Party of President Vicente Fox and president-elect Felipe Calderon opposed the measure. The move also was strongly opposed by representatives of the church and most conservative groups in the country. It would only apply within the municipal bounds of Mexico City, which would become the first territory in Mexico to give legal protection to homosexual unions.

The bill would also extend legal protection to unmarried people who share a home and financial arrangements, including siblings or cousins, said socialist council member Enrique Perez Correa, who sponsored the measure.

Salazar explained the legislation closely resembles France's civil pact of solidarity, or PACS, which is a form of civil union between adults. "It isn't a text only for homosexuals. Two sisters or two opposite-sex cousins could conclude this contract," he said.

Similar measures were being considered by the states of Coahuila, in the south, and Colima, in the north.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 9:22 am 
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It is good to see there is progress in Latino America for the rights of gay people. Here in Spain the government has suprised all of us with the new laws, and we are very happy for it.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2006 8:11 pm 
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Marcelo wrote:
It is good to see there is progress in Latino America for the rights of gay people. Here in Spain the government has suprised all of us with the new laws, and we are very happy for it.


Very good. The Mexicans must have followed the Spanish in this. Are they the only country in Latin America where gay rights are acknowledged, does anyone know? I think here in France, especially after the film "La Cage au Folles" that a lot of French people have become more accepting of gays as ordinary people. The film was clever in involving and exposing a rightist populist for the hypocrite that he is. We French love to attack our government when necessary!

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 Post subject: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 6:51 pm 
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Coming-of-age ritual provides lessons on faith, sex for Hispanic girls
Quinceanera has long been divisive in the U.S. Catholic church

Eric Gorski • The Associated Press • January 5, 2008

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The Rev. Jorge DeLosantos (right) prays during a Quinceanera Mass for Monica Reyes (center) and her younger sister Marisol (left) at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Denver.

On the day she is to become a woman, Monica Reyes sits in front of the church for Mass. Her white dress - sewn in her mother's Mexican hometown - spills over her chair like an oversized lampshade.

The priest urges her to live as a daughter of God. Her parents give her a gold ring shaped like the number 15. Near the end of the service, Reyes lays a bouquet of roses before a statue of the Virgin Mary.

Then she steps through the worn, wooden doors of St. Joseph's, a Roman Catholic parish for generations of poor, Hispanic immigrants, and into a 20-seat white Hummer limo that rents for $150 an hour.

Before long, a stretch Lincoln Town Car arrives for the next Quinceanera Mass.

An elaborate coming-of-age ritual for Hispanic girls on their 15th birthday, the Quinceanera has long been divisive in the U.S. Catholic church, where it's viewed as either an exercise in excess or a great opportunity to send a message about faith and sexual responsibility.

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Jose and Luz Reyes place rings on the fingers of their daughters, Marisol (second from left), and Monica (right), during their Quinceanera Mass in Denver.

The latter view won an important endorsement last summer, when the Vatican approved a new set of prayers for U.S. dioceses called Bendicion al cumplir quince anos, or Order for the Blessing on the Fifteenth Birthday.

Consider it an acknowledgment of the changing face of American Catholicism. Hispanics account for nearly 40 percent of the nation's 65 million Catholics and 71 percent of new U.S. Catholics since 1960, studies show.

Here in the Archdiocese of Denver, Hispanic ministry leaders view the Quinceanera craze as not just a chance to strengthen faith and family, but as a weapon against teen pregnancy.

Before Reyes could get her Quinceanera Mass, she and her parents had to enroll in a four-week curriculum introduced last year at Hispanic-dominated parishes that combines Catholicism 101 with a strong pro-chastity message.

"Some girls come to the class expecting to be taught how to dance," said Alfonso Lara, the archdiocese's Hispanic Ministry coordinator.

The girls in Reyes' class gathered in a stuffy room with a map of Mexico on the wall and a crucifix on the table.

One lesson included tips for safe dating (avoid dating Web sites in favor of group outings in public places like the mall or family barbecues). Then there is an explanation of the difference between simple abstinence (a way to avoid pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases), and chastity (living like Jesus and Mary).

Monica Reyes is the model pupil. Once her Quinceanera is over, the high school junior her sister calls a "girl's girl" will be allowed to go to parties and date, as many of her classmates do. But Reyes isn't eager to join them.

"I'm still too young," she said. "I could have a bad experience. So I'd rather wait."

In Mexico and other Latin American countries, the Quinceanera once signaled that a girl was officially on the marriage market.

The downside to that legacy: The Quinceanera Mass is sometimes seen as sexual coming-of-age moment.

Although teen pregnancy rates have generally been in decline across ethnic lines over the last 15 years, 51 percent of Hispanic teens get pregnant before age 20, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.

"Even now, immigrant parents don't talk to their young daughters about sex," said Timothy Matovina, director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. "There is not an open conversation going on about the value of waiting till marriage or the economic pitfalls of becoming a single mother."

Matovina said the Denver archdiocese's efforts will resonate with some families and be ignored by others, much like couples who go through the motions of marriage preparation classes to get a church wedding.

A blend of European court traditions and ceremonies from Latin American countries, the Quinceanera at times has the feel of an out-of-control prom in the United States.

A $400 million-a-year industry has sprouted up catering to Hispanic immigrants seeking to maintain cultural traditions while showing they've made it in their new countries, offering everything from Quinceanera planners and cruises to professional ballroom dancers to teach the ceremonial waltz.

At the same time, the ritual is a point of tension with the Catholic church because Catholic families want their faith to be part of the celebration yet it isn't a sacrament, like marriage.

The Reyes family does not attend Mass regularly, but would never consider the Quinceanera legitimate without the blessing of a priest. A portrait of Our Lady of Guadalupe watches over the living room of the family's apartment.

"The reason to have the Mass is to be blessed, and to say thanks to God," said Monica's mother, Luz.

The family spared no expense, and the tension showed at times. Walking out of St. Joseph's in her gold lame dress, Luz Reyes said to no one in particular, "Money, money, money."

The family estimates it spent a staggering $20,000 on the Quinceanera, relying on savings, family and friends to pay for two limos, rental of a banquet hall, a buffet of Mexican and American comfort food, dresses, a DJ and more.

The cost is one reason that Monica's 14-year-old sister, Marisol, shared the church altar and dance floor with her older sister.

The family couldn't fathom finding the money for another Quinceanera so soon.

Source: Clarion Ledger.

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 Post subject: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2008 3:33 pm 
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A 29-year-old man who goes by the name Eduardo says he contracted HIV after his only sexual encounter with a man. He professes no attraction to men.
(Jennifer Szymaszek for The New York Times)

Vulnerable to HIV, resistant to labels
By Marc Lacey
August 7, 2008

MEXICO CITY: The 29-year-old is not gay. He wants that known. He did have sex with a man once, but that was the result of loneliness and his hormones' being in overdrive, he said, not because of any attraction to men. He suspects that the one encounter was responsible for giving him the virus that causes AIDS. But he is not gay no matter what anybody may think.

"It was just once," said the man, who goes by the name Eduardo, recounting the sexual liaison he had when he was an illegal immigrant in New York City. He acknowledged that he went back to see the man a second time and noticed then that the man looked sickly.

"I have never felt that I am homosexual because I have never let them make love to me," said Eduardo, who lives an hour outside Mexico City, reflecting an oft-heard sentiment here. "It's the opposite. I penetrate. I have never liked it being done to me." Still, he did not want to be identified further because of the stigma attached.

Long ago, AIDS specialists the world over essentially shelved the terms "gay" and "homosexual" in connection with the epidemic and began referring instead to "men who have sex with men." No matter what label such men apply to themselves — gay, bisexual, transvestite or a heterosexual who experimented for a night or was forced into it — they remain an extremely high-risk group when it comes to HIV

Here in Mexico, where the 17th International AIDS Conference is taking place this week, some hombres que tienen sexo con hombres, or HSHs as they are called, consider themselves gay. Some swear up and down they are straight. Many fall into the gray area in between.

"Sexual identity is a very complex thing," said Hector Carrillo, a professor of human sexuality studies at San Francisco State University who has done research in Mexico. "We like to think that once someone figures out their sexual attraction, they will fit into the categories we've created. But life isn't like that."

HIV and AIDS are concentrated in Mexico among men, particularly those who have sex with other men. While the HIV prevalence in the general population is 0.3 percent, among men who have sex with men it approaches 15 percent.

But this is no homogenous population. Because machismo is pronounced in Mexico and homosexuality is far from accepted, social conditions in the country and in other parts of Latin America force much sexual behavior into the shadows. That increases the challenges that AIDS experts say they face in combating the risky sexual practices that fuel the disease.

For example, when Eduardo was first interviewed, more than a year ago, he referred to the person who gave him HIV as a woman. After months of counseling at a public clinic in connection with his antiretroviral treatments, he now acknowledges that it was a man he had sex with. But he professes no attraction to men.

Experts say that those who live lives of denial, a group that may or may not include Eduardo, frequently engage in high-risk behavior, but do not acknowledge it to anyone, often not even to themselves. Such men are particularly hard to reach in public education campaigns because they bolt or tune out if they sense the message is geared toward gay men.

"I'd say most of the men in Mexico who have sex with men will never recognize that they are gay or bisexual," said Jorge Saavedra, an HIV-positive gay man who directs Mexico's government program to fight AIDS. "Only if you go into in-depth interviews will the information slowly come out. It makes our job all the harder since there is so much shame involved."

Professor Carrillo, who has studied the issue, said that conducting comprehensive surveys on the issue is hard because it is inherently taboo. He said that even north of the border, where homosexuality is far more accepted, some people are uncomfortable with labels and men lead double lives, and he cited the case of James McGreevey, the governor of New Jersey who had a wife and resigned in 2004 after revealing he had had an affair with a man.

And the same applies in the rest of the world. A survey in China showed that half the men who had sex with men also had sex with women, with a third of them reporting that they were married, according to Unaids, the United Nations agency. In Senegal, another study cited by Unaids found that 88 percent of men who reported having sex with men said they also had sex with women.

Those women, of course, also face risks. Mexico has promoted condom use and not stressed fidelity as the cornerstone of its anti-AIDS fight, Saavedra said, because if only the woman is faithful, the man could still acquire the virus by having sex with men on the side. Experts call this the "bisexual bridge."

These relationships can be complicated.

Take the case of a 69-year-old married man, who did not want to be identified, and who is in a relationship with a younger lover, Carlos. Carlos, who has a girlfriend and a child and dresses as a woman, prefers the name Yessica.

"It's a bit unusual," the older man acknowledged. His current wife is unaware of his secret life. A previous wife found out, divorced him and has kept their two children away from him for decades.

He arranges his visits to Yessica on one of two cellphones he carries to keep his life in order: one is for his wife, who lets out occasional homophobic comments and who he says would leave him in a minute if she discovered what was going on; the other is for his occasional lover, who is physically male but feels trapped inside a body that is not his own.

The older man and Yessica say they use condoms most of the time to reduce the risk of contracting the virus that causes AIDS. Both say they were tested for HIV a year ago and were negative.

As for his sexual orientation, the older man with the secret life declared, "I'm not the least bit gay."

Acceptance of gay relationships in Mexico has increased significantly, and that change is evident in the recent adoption of a law in Mexico City allowing civil unions for gay couples. The annual gay pride parade in the capital has grown over 30 years from a small group of people marching down a side street to tens of thousands celebrating on the city's main avenue.

All the same, gay slurs are still commonly heard, attacks on gays are regularly reported to the authorities and many gay people opt to live their lives in the closet.

"We have a culture that obliges us to marry," said Luis Manuel Arellano, an openly gay man who has been active in combating the spread of AIDS and has no plans to find a wife. "We grow up learning to be macho, no matter what we think inside."

Martín Márquez Chagoya, a gay man who has had HIV for 14 years and counsels other men, visits a park in central Puebla where men go to have sex with other men, but he said his efforts to promote condom use there often fell on deaf ears. The No. 1 response he hears from men there is that they are not gay and are therefore not at risk. They say they are merely having sex with gays.

Elisabeth Malkin contributed reporting from Puebla, and Lawrence Altman from Mexico City.

Source: International Herald Tribune.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 3:26 pm 
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Mexico's anti-homophobia campaign offers lessons to world
Thursday August 7, 2008

MEXICO CITY (dpa) — In Mexico City, home to the 17th International AIDS Conference, it is not uncommon to see men embracing and kissing each other in shopping malls or walking down the street holding hands.

Such open displays of homosexuality were rare just a few years ago, said Charlie, a 42-year-old gay man who is HIV positive. Mass-media campaigns and a civil union law for same-sex couples have encouraged greater acceptance of homosexuality in Mexico, even within the largely homophobic Latin society.

Tears in his eyes, Charlie said a decade ago there were only 30 people who formed Mexico's openly gay community. "Today, only two of us are alive. Information was little, and treatment was very expensive," he told DPA.

According to UNAIDS, the joint United Nations programme on HIV/AIDS, unprotected sex between men accounts for more than half of the infections.

"Ignore the men-who-have-sex-with-men populations and you lose the fight against AIDS," said Jorge Saavedra, who has led Mexico's national HIV/AIDS programme, CENSIDA, since 2003.

In every region of the world, HIV infection rates are much higher among men who have sex with men (MSM) than in the general population. Studies reveal that MSM are on an average 19 times more likely to get infected than heterosexual men in poor and middle-income countries.

"MSMs are excluded from (HIV prevention and care) services. We have not tried enough. Mexico, Australia and Brazil have shown that effective response among MSMs is possible," Saavedra said.

Mexico's bold initiatives to tackle both homophobia and the spread of HIV have served to change the landscape for AIDS prevention in Latin America.

Saavedra was responsible for launching the Mexican policy of universal access to antiretroviral drugs, which currently covers 47,000 people living with HIV and AIDS. In 2004, he spearheaded an official anti-machismo education campaign, following it up a year later with the first government-endorsed anti-homophobia drive.

In 2006, he appointed the first transgender woman in a government position.

Activists in Mexico say that Saavedra's policies, such as the civil union law that came into force last year, have helped combat homophobia. The law may not legalise same-sex marriage or allow gays and lesbians to adopt children, but it does give couples the right to inherit property and have joint health and life insurance policies.

Saavedra, the first openly gay national leader in Mexico, called for greater involvement of MSM in the planning of national AIDS responses globally, the decriminalisation of sexual behaviour between consenting adults and greater commitment from donors to pay for MSM programmes.

He said that his new goal was to officially declare the 51 new walk-in HIV clinics in Mexico as "homophobia-free services."

When the conference opened, UNAIDS executive director Peter Piot said: "I salute Mexico's anti-homophobia campaign - one of the boldest and most creative in the world."

In 86 countries, consensual, adult homosexual activity is a criminal offence. In 10 countries it is punishable by death.

Crimes against homosexuals all over the world include killing, torture and arbitrary imprisonment. Homophobia increases their vulnerability to HIV and is one of the main drivers of the AIDS epidemic.

"It is very difficult to provide services to MSM in countries that do not acknowledge their existence," said Craig McClure, executive director of the International AIDS Society, which organises the biennial conference.

Saavedra said: "Homophobia comes from ignorance and prejudices that come from religious beliefs. MSM is not a population to blame for HIV. It is a sub-group that is suffering most the impact of HIV."

Jamie Lopez, 45, a lawyer and gay-rights activist in Mexico City, helped compile a book about 10 local gay couples: "We asked our friends to come forward to tell their story. Many were afraid to talk openly about it. One couple has three children they look after, but they cannot adopt them officially.

"The best way to change society is to make ourselves visible and demand our rights," Lopez said. "People want you to be in the closet. We are a very conservative society. Religion has caused a lot of homophobia."

Brazil has also shown remarkable leadership in stamping out homophobia. Prompted by high levels of violence against homosexuals and a need to ensure their rights, Brazil established a Mixed Parliamentary Front for Free Sexual Expression in October 2003.

Two years later, a campaign called Brazil Against Homophobia was officially launched. The National Business Council on AIDS attempts to sensitise business leaders about countering homophobia in the workplace.

"There is greater openness to homosexuality in Brazil. The national programme is partnering with gay groups to provide leadership. A section of the church has also been supportive of gay rights," Carlos Andre Passarelli, director of Brazil's International Centre for Technical Cooperation on HIV/AIDS, told DPA.

"AIDS has some positive aspects - it has brought visibility to groups like the MSM. It has given them funds to organise themselves and prevent HIV."

Source: New India Press/DPA.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 5:26 pm 
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Homosexuality must be legal to beat Caribbean AIDS: activists

August 8, 2008

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Pictures of HIV patients are hung on display at the Global village in Mexico City, on August 6, 2008. Sex between men, which is prevalent in the Caribbean region, must be decriminalized or AIDS will never be beaten there, experts at an AIDS conference in Mexico City said Thursday.
(AFP/Luis Acosta)

MEXICO CITY (AFP) — Sex between men, which is prevalent in the Caribbean region, must be decriminalized or AIDS will never be beaten there, experts at an AIDS conference in Mexico City said Thursday.

Participants at the six-day International AIDS Conference, gathering more than 22,000 people, said it was very complicated for men to access AIDS tests and potential treatment in the region with the second highest figure of HIV/AIDS cases worldwide at one percent of the population.

The figure represents more than a quarter of a million people and is second only to Sub-saharan Africa.

Half of Caribbean men have had multiple sexual contacts with a member of the same sex, and between 80 and 90 percent have had sexual relations with another man at least once, according to figures from psychologists in Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago.

"It will not be possible to have effective HIV/AIDS prevention in the Caribbean if we don't decriminalize (sexual) relations between men," said Michael Kleinmoedig, a West Indian journalist and social activist.

Stigma and discrimination, a problem worldwide for people with HIV/AIDS, were particularly bad in the region.

"Human rights are limited for those who have (sexual) relations with men. They are not recognized as a valid group by law and many countries silence them and deny them their rights," Kleinmoedig said.

Many of them are married and have children.

Moreover, some 20 percent of those with HIV in the region, mainly women, contracted the virus through their partner, said Peter Figueroa, director of epidemiology and AIDS for the Jamaican government.

On a rare positive note for the region, he highlighted universal access to AIDS treatment in Cuba.

Some 33 million people around the world are infected with HIV, 90 percent of whom live in developing countries.

Source: Yahoo! AFP.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 5:27 am 
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Mexico City approves name changes for transsexuals
The Associated Press
August 30, 2008

MEXICO CITY: Mexico City's legislature has passed a law making it easier for transsexuals and transgender people to legally change their names and obtain revised birth certificates that reflect their gender identification.

Current law already lets people change their names based on gender identification. But because of the lack of specific rules, the process can take years to wind through the courts.

The new law formalizes the procedure for name changes and lets people ask a judge for new birth certificates.

It passed 37-17 Friday and now goes to the mayor to be signed into law.

Mexico City's leftist government has recently legalized abortion during the first 12 weeks and allowed same-sex civil unions.

Source: International Herald Tribune.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2008 4:15 pm 
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Mexico City to give out Viagra to men 70 and older
November 13, 2008

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico City is giving out free Viagra and other impotence drugs to men 70 and older. Mayor Marcelo Ebrard says the city is implementing the plan because sexuality "has a lot to do with quality of life and our happiness."

City Health Secretary Armando Ahued said Thursday that the government will start handing out doses of one or two Viagra, Levitra or Cialis pills on Dec. 1.

They will be distributed at three centers that specialize in sexual health for the elderly. The men will receive medical examinations before receiving the pills.

Ahued says an estimated 112,000 men 70 or older live in the Federal District, which has a population of 8.7 million. Some 20 million people live in the greater Mexico City area.

Source: Breitbart

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2009 12:33 pm 
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Mayor denies kissing ban, invites all to pucker up
January 20, 2009

MEXICO CITY (AP) — When you come to Guanajuato, pucker up. Mayor Eduardo Romero is declaring the colonial city in central Mexico "the kissing capital" of the world to disprove, once and for all, claims that he has banned smooching in public.

The flap arose over an anti-obscenity law that many people believed would fine anyone caught kissing in public. The government denied it intended to ban kissing, but agreed to suspend the legislation so its wording could be reviewed.

Romero unveiled advertisements Tuesday featuring a couple locking lips on one of Guanajuato's many winding, cobble-stoned streets. They read: "Guanajuato, the kissing capital."

A local legend of forbidden love gives the city claim to the title. It tells of a young woman whose father prohibited her from seeing her lover because he was too poor. But the couple lived across from each other in a street so narrow they could lean out their windows to kiss in secret.

That street remains known as the "kissing alley."

Source: Breitbart

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2009 9:54 am 
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Second Mexican city invites all to come kiss
January 22, 2009

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Inviting people to pucker up seems to be all the rage in Mexican cities. The Mexico City government is urging people to converge on the huge Zocalo city center and simultaneously kiss on Valentine's Day. City Tourism Secretary Alejandro Rojas says the goal is to break the world record for the most people kissing at one time.

The announcement Thursday came two days after Guanajuato Mayor Eduardo Romero declared his colonial city in central Mexico the "kissing capital" of the world. Romero was trying to disprove claims that he had banned kissing through an anti-obscenity law.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the biggest mass kiss to date came on Sept. 1, 2007, when 6,980 couples smooched in Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Source: Breitbart

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2009 5:11 pm 
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Mexico City sets kissing record on Valentine's Day
February 14, 2009
By OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ
Associated Press Writer

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Couples kiss in Mexico City, Saturday, Feb. 14, 2009. Thousands gathered in Mexico City's central plaza to pucker up for peace and break the world record for the largest number of people kissing at one time. (AP Photo/Claudio Cruz)

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico City puckered up to set a new record Saturday as nearly 40,000 people locked lips in the city center for the world's largest group kiss.

Carlos Martinez of Guinness World Records verified the record of 39,897 people who entered the gated kissing area of the city's Zocalo main square on Valentine's Day, besting Weston-super-Mare, an English town that set the previous kissing record in 2007. "We did it! Long live Mexico," said Mexican singer-actress Susana Zavaleta, who serenaded the crowd before the kiss with the classic Mexican ballad, "Besame Mucho," or "Kiss Me a Lot" — also the name of the event.

The Valentine's Day kiss was meant to show love at a time when a crackdown against drug traffickers has led to widespread violence across the country. At least 6,000 people died in drug-related conflicts in 2008. "More than 35,000 will simultaneously kiss to show that warmth and love are at the core of this capital, the heart of the Mexican Republic," the city's tourism department, which organized the gathering, said in a statement.

The event "is aimed at changing people's attitudes toward human relations, especially between couples, so that respect, equity and tolerance are at the center of any relationship," the statement said. The giant Zocalo, which can hold 100,000 people, was half-filled as mostly young couples embraced and held one another in a lip lock for 10 seconds.

The kiss was delayed for several hours as organizers waited for people to gather. As the crowd grew, city workers in cupid wings offered hugs, teenage boys carried signs volunteering their kissing services and couples practiced openly in a country that surprises many with its pervasive public displays of affection.

"We love demonstrating our love in front of everyone and in front of our family," said Lucia Gutierrez, 38, who spent the afternoon rehearsing with Vicente Romero, 34, her boyfriend of 10 months. "There's nothing bad about showing your love."

Benito Zavala, 53, who works in a store nearby, said he didn't have time to go home to get his wife. So he planned to help set the record with his 2-year-old Chihuahua, Onix, who was licking his lips. "It's a good idea because a lot of people feel the need to share their affection," Zavala said. "They already do it in the Metro, in the street, so I think it's best if they all do it together."

The event also included workshops on violence-free relationships and AIDS prevention. As soon as the kissing stopped, participants started chanting "Cente!" the nickname for Mexico's most popular ranchera singer, Vicente Fernandez, who followed the smooch-fest with a free concert.

On the Net: http://www.besamemucho.df.gob.mx
Source: Breitbart.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:37 am 
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Mexican labs target adulterers with DNA testing
20 November 2009

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Suspect your significant other might be cheating on you? In Mexico, numerous laboratories are now offering a way to find out for sure -- DNA tests.

"If someone thinks they are the victim of adultery, they can bring us underwear, a sheet, chewing gum," which provide testers with traces of sperm, saliva or hair, said Jorge Guillen, director of one of the labs offering the service.

The test determines whether the DNA found on the sample corresponds to the client or someone else.

The process can take between four and six days and costs anywhere from 200 to 500 dollars, Guillen said.

DNA tests for private use are legal in Mexico.

"Demand for infidelity tests is growing in Mexico. I get 50 requests in a single day. It is something new to the majority of people and some of our applicants think that infidelity is in the genes," Guillen added.

A 2008 study by a private research institute in Mexico found one in six Mexicans suspects their partners may be cheating on them.

Source: Breitbart AFP.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2009 5:41 am 
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Mexico City assembly legalizes same-sex marriage
December 21, 2009
By E. EDUARDO CASTILLO
Associated Press Writer

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Mexico City, Mexico: Gay rights activists kiss as they celebrate the legalisation of same-sex marriage in the city
Photograph: Alexandre Meneghini/AP

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico City lawmakers on Monday made the city the first in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage, a change that will give homosexual couples more rights, including allowing them to adopt children.

The bill passed the capital's local assembly 39-20 to the cheers of supporters who yelled: "Yes, we could! Yes, we could!" Leftist Mayor Marcelo Ebrard of the Democratic Revolution Party is widely expected to sign the measure into law. The bill calls for changing the definition of marriage in the city's civil code. Marriage is currently defined as the union of a man and a woman. The new definition will be "the free uniting of two people."

The change would allow same-sex couples to adopt children, apply for bank loans together, inherit wealth and be included in the insurance policies of their spouse, rights they were denied under civil unions allowed in the city. "We are so happy," said Temistocles Villanueva, a 23-year-old film student who celebrated by passionately kissing his boyfriend outside the city's assembly.

Only seven countries allow gay marriages: Canada, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands and Belgium. U.S. states that permit same-sex marriage are Iowa, Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut and New Hampshire. Argentina's capital became the first Latin American city to legalize same-sex civil unions in 2002 for gay and lesbian couples. Four other Argentine cities later did the same, and as did Mexico City in 2007 and some Mexican and Brazilian states. Uruguay alone has legalized civil unions nationwide.

Buenos Aires lawmakers introduced a bill for legalizing gay marriage in the national Congress in October but it has stalled without a vote, and officials in the South American city have blocked same-sex wedding because of conflicting judicial rulings. Many people in Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America remain opposed to gay marriage, and the dominate Roman Catholic Church has announced its opposition.

City lawmaker Victor Romo, a member of the mayor's leftist party, called it a historic day. "For centuries unjust laws banned marriage between blacks and whites or Indians and Europeans," he said. "Today all barriers have disappeared."

Source: Breitbart.

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 Post subject: Re: Mexico and sex
PostPosted: Sun Mar 07, 2010 3:04 pm 
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Gay marriage law comes into effect in Mexico City
4 March 2010

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Judith Vazquez and Lol-kin Castaneda hope to marry soon

A law allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry comes into effect on Thursday in Mexico City.

The law, which was passed by the city's local assembly in December, gives gay people full marital rights, including the right to adopt. Several gay couples are now expected to register to get married as early as next week. Mexico City is one of the first capitals in Latin America to fully recognise gay marriages.

Judith Vazquez and partner Lol-kin Castaneda hope to become one of the first couples to marry under the new law. "It's the end of our fight and the beginning of life in freedom in Mexico City," Ms Vazquez told the BBC. "This is a great, historic moment for the whole of society in Mexico City," added Ms Castaneda.

'Symbolic closet'

With this law - and previous legalisation on abortion and some form of euthanasia - the Mexican capital has become a liberal and progressive island in what remains a mostly conservative nation, says the BBC's Julian Miglierini in Mexico City.

But local gay activists say homophobic attacks are still frequent across the country, where people continue to face discrimination in the workplace for being gay or are attacked when displaying public affection to a person of the same sex, our correspondent adds.

Both the Catholic Church and conservative groups oppose the legislation, and the centre-right government even tried to get a ruling by the Supreme Court to block Mexico City from issuing gay marriage licences; they have so far been unsuccessful.

Despite the move in the capital, a gay marriage law at a federal level in Mexico remains unlikely. Judith Vazquez says: "Our real battle is with our people in Mexico... Now we will have to leave our symbolic closet because we will be [considered] citizens and we have to go out to live in freedom."

In Latin America, only Uruguay has legalised civil unions nationwide and allowed same-sex couples to adopt children. A handful of cities - in Argentina, Ecuador and Colombia - allow gay unions.

Source: BBC News.

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