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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:01 pm 
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In Honduras, another LGBT person is brutally murdered
December 31st, 2010

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- They beat him and burned his body in a suburb of Tegucigalpa. The crime adds to the long list of unpunished murders of LGBT people in the country.

23 Year old Alexis Alvarado identified as Luis Hernandez was brutally murdered in the suburb of Comayaguela in Tegucigalpa, in what could be a hate crime motivated by sexual orientation of the victim.

According to local press, the crime took place in the neighborhood of Villa Union in the early morning hours and the victim was taken from his home by one or more persons who had abused him before hitting him with stones and burning his body. In addition to the lighter with which the fire started, police found two condoms at the scene of the crime.

So far, the neighbors said there was no noise or screams that alerted the event. Local media differ over whether the victim was a transsexual or a homosexual man. According to the newspaper La Tribuna, "the family said that although their brother was of a different sexual orientation he was very dear."

For a couple of years, human rights organizations and LGBT activists have denounced a series of crimes against homosexuals in Honduras. In August this year, a witness theoretically "protected" was found dead after police declared they were under investigation for the murder of a transsexual woman.

In 2009, the killing of activist Walter Tróchez also brought condemnation from various organizations. Even the French government ruled towards the clarification of the crime.

In all cases, it is reported that since the coup occurred on 28 June last year the situation has worsened. The role of law enforcement, especially the police, has been questioned and their performance has led observers to believe in various degrees of complicity with the perpetrators.

Source: San Diego Gay & Lesbian News.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 5:37 pm 
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Six trans women killed in Honduras in two months
1 February 2011

LGBT campaigners are calling on Honduran authorities to fully investigate the murders of six transgender women in just 60 days.

According to Human Rights Watch, the first death was on November 29th and the latest took place on January 17th. The women were murdered on the streets or in their homes in the capital, Tegucigalpa, and in the cities of Comayagüela and San Pedro Sula. The attacks ranged from gunshots to setting the victims on fire.

Indyra Mendoza, director of Honduran lesbian group Red Lésbica Cattrachas, said: "The impunity with which these murders have taken place has shaken the entire lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community in Honduras. We need legislative change and prevention programs to end discrimination in Honduras, because at the moment we are living our lives in hiding."

Human Rights Watch said the women appeared to have been tortured before being killed. The victims were Idania Roberta Sevilla Raudales, 58; Luisa Alvarado Hernández, 23; Lady Óscar Martínez Salgado, 45; Reana "Cheo" Bustamente; Briget Makaligton and Fergie Alice Ferg. The government is failing to tackle the killings, Human Rights Watch claims.

Dipika Nath, researcher in the LGBT programme at the charity, said: "The government needs to act urgently to fulfill its obligations under international treaties and swiftly arrest and bring to trial those responsible for these murders. It is up to the government to fulfill its commitment to protect the rights of all Hondurans regardless of their gender identity and sexual orientation."

Source: PinkNews.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 3:22 pm 
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In Honduras, LGBT Protest Unsolved Murders
by Paul Canning
September 26, 2011

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Every month, outside the Ministerio Público (Public Ministry) in downtown Tegucigalpa, Honduras, LGBTs protest 85 unsolved murders. The protests are happening on the 13th of each month "because Walter Tróchez was killed on December 13, 2009," said leader Donis Reyes.

Tróchez was a political activist and LGBT rights leader who was killed after threats and previous attacks. His death led to worldwide protests, including by Amnesty International.

LGBT Honduran groups say that there have been 54 murders since January 2010. In all cases, the police have not arrested and prosecuted the perpetrators, Reyes said. "There is total impunity, no murder solved," Reyes said.

The protesters were dressed in costumes that mimicked death and the goddess Themis, who represents justice, and carrying signs that said: "No more crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity in Honduras" and "Justice for Walter Tróchez."

In early 2011, representatives of the LGBT community met with Human Rights Minister, Ana Pineda, to discuss the problems. The demonstrators presented the project "Building Public Safety Initiative in Tegucigalpa Sexual Diversity," which asked the Public Ministry, in particular the Human Rights Prosecutor, to investigate the deaths of their comrades and make a robust response.

Pineda has said that: "Homophobia is a reprehensible act from every point of view when it is an individual doing it, but even worse when it is because of an action or lack thereof by a state servant."

Both the United Nations and the U.S. government have expressed concern over the murder of LGBTs and have requested the State to comply with measures to ensure their safety and punish crimes against them.

Since the 2009 coup, LGBT groups have reported increased targeted and brutal persecution and many people have fled the country. The persecution against the LGBT community is more than just political. It reflects a worrying change in the attitude and policy of the Honduran government from that of ousted President Manuel Zelaya.

Fundamentalist religious groups have a large degree of influence within the elite interests that were behind the coup; the same groups who openly denounce homosexuality as a sickness. "We knew what a coup meant and how that would harm us. That's why we protested against [the coup]," said Iván Banegas, coordinator of the group Colectivo Violeta, an LGBT rights group. "After the coup, the army and police came down especially hard on the transsexuals, many of whom live on prostitution and were in the streets in the middle of the curfews," he said.

However, the situation was bad even before the coup. In May 2009, one month before the coup, Human Rights Watch warned that Honduran police systematically abused LGBT Hondurans. Those fleeing to the US, however, face an asylum system which may reject them, or in the case of Honduran Miguel Caceres Juarez, continue to detain him (he was released after a campaign) despite a judge granting "withholding of removal," a form of immigration protection for people who have suffered or fear persecution in their native countries.

Source: Care2.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:59 pm 
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Honduras bans child marriage, no exceptions
13 July 2017

BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Lawmakers in Honduras voted unanimously to ban child marriage, making it illegal in the Central American nation for children under the age of 18 to get married under any circumstances.

The law passed on Tuesday raises the minimum marriage age to 18 from 16 and removes all exceptions for child marriage, meaning that girls and boys under 18 cannot get married even with the permission of their parents.

Belinda Portillo from children’s charity Plan International said Honduras had “made history” by passing the law in a country where one in four children are married before the age of 18. “The fight against child marriage is a strategic way of promoting the rights and empowerment of women in various areas, such as health, education, work, freedom from violence,” Portillo, Plan’s Honduras country director, said in a statement.

Enforcing the law will be hardest in indigenous communities and poor rural areas in Honduras where child marriage is most prevalent, campaigners say.

Often driven by poverty and cultural acceptance, child marriage usually involves a girl marrying an older man and deprives girls of education and opportunities, keeping them in poverty. Each year more than 15 million girls worldwide are married before they turn 18, campaign group Girls Not Brides says.

Experts say child brides are more likely to be victims of sexual and domestic abuse and become teenage mothers. Pregnancy and childbirth complications are the leading cause of death for girls aged 15 to 19 globally.

Portillo said banning child marriage in Honduras would give girls a chance to be better educated and increase their earnings, helping to boost the country’s annual gross domestic product by about 3.5 percent. In a report last month, the World Bank said child marriage will cost developing countries trillions of dollars by 2030, hampering global efforts to eradicate poverty.

Most Latin American countries ban marriage until 18, but many of them still allow children to get married at a younger age with the permission of parents or a judge. Campaigners hope other countries in Latin America will follow Honduras’s example. Lawmakers in the Dominican Republic - a country with the second highest rate of child marriage in the region - along with El Salvador are mulling proposed reforms to outlaw child marriage.

Reporting by Anastasia Moloney
Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

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