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 Post subject: Peru and sex, sexuality
PostPosted: Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:19 pm 
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Gay groups in Peru seek election alliance in wake of Argentina law
15 July 2010
by Isabel Guerra

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After the approval of gay marriage in Argentina, two homosexual organizations in Lima announced they are seeking for political allies among the candidates running in Peru's 2011 presidential elections, in order to promote gay marriage in Peru.

Jorge Apolaya, spokesperson for the Peruvian Network of Travestites, Lesbians, Gays and Bisexuals, told EFE news agency that "it is necessary to pass a law for all those persons that want to access as a couple to legal benefits such as social security, a mortgage, a life insurance or heritage." Peru will have presidential and congress elections in April 2011, since Alan Garcia will leave office in July 2011. "Those who have avoided a public debate about this topic now will have to enter the debate," Apolaya said.

The only presidential candidate who has openly approved gay marriage in his government plan is TV host and writer Jaime Bayly, but private polls reveal that 73% of Peruvians are against these unions. Apolaya says that marriage "cannot be a heterosexual privilege" in a country where "there is allegedly an equality of rights for all citizens."

Argentina became the first country in Latin American to approve gay marriage following a 14-hour debate in the senate (gay marriage has been legal in Mexico City since 2010).

Source: Living In Peru.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 3:40 am 
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Peru sex slavery: Police free 293 women in Amazon
4 October 2011

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More than 400 police took part in the three-day operation

Police in Peru say they have rescued nearly 300 women from sexual exploitation in a raid in the country's Amazon region.

At least four people were arrested in Puerto Maldonado on suspicion of human trafficking. Among those rescued from about 50 brothels were at least 10 minors - the youngest was a 13-year-old girl. More than 400 police took part in the three-day operation in the region, known for its illegal gold mining. The region has seen an influx of fortune-hunters trying to make a living from the trade.

Prosecutors say young girls are lured to the area by women who travel around offering them jobs in shops or as domestic helpers, but that the girls often end up being forced to work as prostitutes in local bars. Last month, the charity Save the Children said that more than 1,100 underage girls were being used as sexual slaves in illegal mining camps in the south-eastern Peruvian state of Madre de Dios. Camps set up along the main highway have also attracted unlicensed bars used for prostitution.

The gold rush is contributing to the destruction of the rain forest and contaminating the environment with tons of mercury, used in processing the precious metal. Peru is the world's fifth largest gold producer.

Source: BBC.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 7:30 am 
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Peru gay rights activists push for more rights in law
12 February 2012
By Mattia Cabitza

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Crissthian Olivera sued a supermarket for discrimination

On 12 February 2011, the Peruvian police beat a group of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people who were kissing in the capital's main square to protest against discrimination.

A year later, Lima's gay movement is renaming the anniversary as Peru's Stonewall, in reference to the riots in New York in 1969 which gave rise to the global gay rights movement. But much remains to be done for LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual] people in Peru.

For more than seven years, Crissthian Olivera has been trying to get justice for what he says was discrimination because of his sexual orientation. It was August 2004, and he and his then partner were sitting at a cafe inside a supermarket in the Peruvian capital. "We were looking at each other in a romantic way," he recalls. "We weren't kissing or hugging. But a member of staff came over and told us that we had to change our behaviour."

The staff told them they had to sit facing each other, and refrain from showing affection there because there were children and families around. "From being customers at the establishment," he says, "we were suddenly treated almost like criminals, basically because of our sexual orientation. They don't speak like this to heterosexual couples." Mr Olivera sued the supermarket for discrimination. But his case was dismissed by the courts.

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MHOL website announcing 12 February protest: For LGBT dignity, Kisses against Homophobia

"His case is common," says Giovanny Romero, the president of MHOL, the Homosexual Movement of Lima. "In Peru, democracy is neither democratic nor inclusive. There are people like us who live in the margins of the margins of society. We are liberal only in economic terms. But as far as human rights, we still live in the Middle Ages."

'No complaints'

Carlos Chipoco, a lawyer at the Commission for Justice and Human Rights in the Peruvian Congress, says gay people need to speak up more to protect their rights. "Every day, we receive complaints about violations of human rights," he says, "but nothing from the gay community. They should try to push for constitutional actions that protect their rights. But it's not just about having laws. Many of our laws are not respected. What we need are movements that demand that judges apply sanctions to those who don't respect our laws."

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Human rights lawyer Carlos Chipoco says the gay community should push for constitutional actions to protect their rights

Giovanny Romero rejects such criticism. MHOL, he says, has brought a legal action against a clinic that forbade one of its members from donating blood. He adds that the movement, as well as other organisations, has long pushed for recognition of LGBT rights in the courts and through better legislation.

The need for more protection of this minority group is hard to ignore. According to an investigation by MHOL, one person is killed each week in Peru because of his or her sexual orientation or gender identity. Yet, confronted with such homophobia - which Carlos Chipoco himself recognises is widespread - the Peruvian Congress has yet to debate proposed legislation that would severely sanction all hate crimes. "It would be the first step of a country that begins to value our lives," says Mr Romero. "It's about protecting the right of people to live, and sanction in an exemplary way all hate crimes."

Mr Chipoco agrees that the law is needed, but he says that consensus is hard to reach among politicians. "There are many who are very conservative and have a religious belief that homosexuality is a sin," he says. "But we will probably present the draft legislation again, and let's hope it can advance."

'Keep fighting'

Mr Olivera believes achieving better rights in Peru will be difficult. He recounts the story of Jefry Pena, a transsexual woman who in 2007 was brutally beaten by a group of men, after the police refused to help her when she was being chased by her attackers. Such hate crimes are not particular to Peru, but the country lags behind some others in the region on LGBT rights. Argentina recognises gay marriage and adoptions; Colombia has progressive public awareness campaigns; and "Brazil Without Homophobia" has been a government initiative there for years.

Nevertheless, Mr Olivera remains optimistic, and wants his case to be heard at the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights. "We need to change our society and culture," he says, "and to erase all those prejudices about homosexuality. Our rights will not magically fall from the sky. That's why we need to keep on fighting."

Source: BBC.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2013 12:26 pm 
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Peru cancels ban on gay police in relationships
16 December 2012
By Andrew Potts

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The Peruvian Presidential Palace in Lima
Photo: Christian Haugen

The Peruvian government has reversed a ban on police officers being in ‘scandalous’ same-sex relationships just days after the ban was passed.

Legislative Decree 1150 for the country’s Police Disciplinary Board stated that officers in homosexual relationships that ‘scandalized’ the Peruvian police forces and undermined its corporate image should be forced into retirement. The new decree reads ‘sex causing scandal’ and omits the word ‘homosexual.’

In comparison, the originally decree stipulated that police officers who physically or psychologically abused their family members should only be suspended for between six and ten days. This has now been amended to between eleven and fifteen days.

It’s passing resulted in uproar from Peruvian LGBT rights group the Homosexual Movement of Lima (MHOL) and several members of the country’s Congress and was labelled a ‘monumental blunder’ by the Peru21 news agency. On Wednesday MHOL president Giovanny Romero told Canal N that the law was unconstitutional and discriminatory. ‘If you are going to punish people for their relationships, then it must be both homosexual and heterosexual,’ Romero told Canal N.

Peruvian President Ollanta Humala initially expressed support for the decree but it appears that the Peruvian government reversed the rule after cabinet was split over the issue.

Source: Gay Star News.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 6:35 am 
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Peru celebrities pose as gay couples for acceptance campaign
20 November 2013
By Andrew Potts

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Two of the billboards Photo by Twitter

A new billboard campaign in Lima, Peru hopes to help eliminate homophobia by showing famous Peruvians posing as if they were gay couples to show people that there is nothing wrong with being gay.

The billboards are part of the ‘Imaginary Couples’ campaign, which is modeled on a similar campaign from France by photographer Olivier Ciappa.

Each of the billboards thanks the pair of ‘heterosexual friends who agreed to be one of the ‘Imaginary Couples,’” featured in the photo and bare the slogan ‘Love is not a crime.’

Among the first ‘couples’ to be seen in the billboard campaign are politician and economist Pedro Pablo Kuczynski and musician-comedian Pablo Villanueva Branda, comedian Jorge Benavides and boxer Juan Zegarra, politician Kenji Fujimori and retired footballer Miguel Rebosio, and entertainer Carlos Galdós and actor Jason Day.

Lawmakers have been seeking to legalize same-sex civil unions in Peru since 2010 but the current government of President Ollanta Humala opposes them. Last year Igualdad Peru director Luis Antonio Capurro told GSN that enlisting heterosexual allies would be crucial in achieving LGBTI equality in Peru.

Source: GayStarNews.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2015 12:10 pm 
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Peru congressman inspired by Hitler to block gay civil unions
By Andrew Potts
17 March 2015

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Ruben Condori Cusi

A Peru congressman has said he was inspired by Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf to block civil unions for same-sex couples.

Ruben Condori Cusi, a congressman for the right-wing Nationalist Party, made the comments to Arroba Radio saying that Hitler wasn’t wrong about everything. ‘I read Mein Kampf by Hitler ... and in some parts he's right, because some types of misconduct are generated by a certain kind of life,’ Cusi said. ‘Homosexuality is more or less a kind of misconduct.’

Cusi went on to say men and women should only have certain roles in life and lesbians were only that way because they hated men. ‘Washing, ironing, cooking, is unique to the female gender … a woman only becomes a lesbian out of resentment [of men],' he said.

However Cusi said if he discovered he had a gay son he would try to ‘understand them and support them, but would try to get them to reform.'

The bill, which was put forward by the first openly gay Peruvian lawmaker Carlos Bruce, was killed by the Congress’ Justice and Human Rights Committee in a vote of 7 to 4 with 2 abstentions. For trying to get same-sex couples recognized for the first time in Peru, he was publicly called a ‘maricon,’ or faggot, by a prominent Catholic Bishop over his efforts.

Source: GayStarNews

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