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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2015 4:19 am 
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Fathers rape with impunity, fuelling Guatemala's teen pregnancies: rights group
By Anastasia Moloney
2 October 2015

BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - In Guatemala, most pregnancies among girls under 14 are the result of rape at the hands of fathers or other relatives, but often it is the girl who is forced to leave the family home, and few perpetrators are punished, said a leading rights campaigner.

Nearly a quarter of all births in Guatemala are among teenage mothers - one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy in Latin America.

"In the majority of cases of sexual violence against girls, some as young as 10, most are committed by family members, mainly by the girl's father or stepfather," said Mirna Montenegro, the head of Guatemala's Sexual and Reproductive Health Observatory (OSAR).

In 2012, nearly 90 percent of all pregnancies among Guatemalan girls under 14 involved relatives, including cousins and uncles, of which 30 percent were the result of rape by fathers, according to Guatemala's human rights ombudsman. Despite new laws passed in Guatemala to better protect against sexual violence, few who commit rape against girls are punished. "Getting justice for girls who report crimes of sexual violence is still a big challenge for us. Often it's the pregnant girl who is removed from her home and placed in a refuge and not the perpetrator of the crime," Montenegro told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a telephone interview. According to a 2009 law, sex with a child under 14 is defined as rape, but of the 2,000 reported cases of under-14s getting pregnant in 2012, only eight resulted in convictions, Montenegro said.

Guatemala's children's prosecutor, Harold Flores, said the country's high teen pregnancy rate was a "scourge", and there were few convictions for rape carried out on girls under 14. "We want girls, who have been victims of sexual violence, to remain in their home or be under the care of a relative. In some cases in the past girls were placed in government care and the aggressor wasn't arrested," he said from Guatemala City. "It's deplorable that many of these cases are a result of sexual violence within the nuclear family: stepfathers, uncles, fathers, and grandfathers. We're reaching more and more girls as soon as we hear about a case and we have expanded our presence across Guatemala and rural areas," Flores said.

MACHO SOCIETY

High levels of sexual violence against women and girls stem from the low status of women, especially indigenous Mayan women, in Guatemala's patriarchal and macho society.

"Machismo is about men believing a woman is their property and possession. We've heard fathers say 'She's my daughter and my property so I will do what I want with her," said Montenegro. She said gender violence is also a legacy of Guatemala's 1960-1996 civil war when rape was used as a weapon of war.

Complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the second highest cause of death for 15 to 19 year-old girls globally, and babies born to adolescent mothers face a 'substantially higher risk' of dying than those born to women in their early 20s, according to the World Health Organization. In Guatemala, teenage pregnancy is most common among uneducated indigenous girls, especially in poor rural areas. "Girls in rural areas don't have or know other options in life. Their lives are limited to finding a partner, having children and looking after the home," Montenegro said.

Guatemala's high prevalence of child marriage, where girls can marry at 14 with their parent's consent, also fuels adolescent pregnancy, Montenegro said. Guatemala's congress is considering a bill that would raise the minimum legal age for marriage to 16 for girls and 18 for boys, with the issue a debating point ahead of the country's presidential election run-off on Oct. 25. "For this first time we've seen the issue of child marriage come up during the election campaign. The majority of presidential candidates have said they are in favor of raising the minimum age for marriage," said Montenegro, whose organization is an alliance of universities, non-governmental organizations and lawmakers.

Last year, 5,100 girls under 14 became pregnant in the Central American country, up from 4,354 in 2013, according to OSAR. One reason for the increase is because hospitals and health providers have to report pregnancies among girls under 14 under a law passed in 2012.

Source: Reuters.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 11:58 pm 
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Gay couples celebrate civil unions for first time in Chile
22 October 2015

SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) -- Dozens of same-sex couples in Chile began celebrating civil unions on Thursday, taking advantage of a new law that gay advocates say is a clear sign of change in a country long regarded as one of Latin America's most socially conservative.

The civil union law was debated in Congress for over a decade until it was passed and signed into law by the president in April. As it went into effect, couples began arriving at civil registry offices early to officially validate their unions. Some wore matching traditional Chilean cowboy garb, others elegant tuxedos and dresses.

"It was beautiful. It was such a nice ceremony. It was all very emotional. Our families were here, everyone was shedding tears," Virginia Gomez told reporters after she registered her union with her partner, Roxana Ortiz. "History changes today," Ortiz said, showing the blue passport-like document that validates their union. The couple had married in Spain but their union was not recognized in Chile. "Now we can make decisions together like a couple. We're thrilled."

Civil union gives same-sex and unmarried couples many of the rights granted to married couples. Partners can inherit each other's property, join one another's health plans and receive pension benefits. They have been recognized in several South American countries, though only Argentina and Uruguay allow formal gay marriage. Gay advocates in Chile are celebrating the right to same-sex civil unions as a step toward full rights.

"The civil union doesn't end our struggle. We're demanding same-sex marriage. We're going to request for the measures stuck in congress to be revived," said Rolando Jimenez, president of the Gay Liberation and Integration Movement. Chile decriminalized gay sex in 1999 and It was one of the last countries in the world to legalize divorce, in 2004. The brutal killing of a gay man in 2012 set off a national debate that prompted Congress to pass a hate crimes law.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:30 pm 
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In pageant-crazy Venezuela, men compete for Miss Gay crown
22 October 2015

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In this Oct. 18, 2015 photo, contestant Jorge Solano, Miss Gay Cojedes, waits backstage, ready to compete in the Miss Gay Venezuela beauty pageant in Caracas, Venezuela. At the ninth annual competition, men donned elaborate wigs and layers of makeup to show off their skills in what they call “the art of transformation.” (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -- There's a beauty contest for almost everyone in pageant-obsessed Venezuela.

In the popular Miss Gay Venezuela competition, men don elaborate wigs and layers of makeup to show off their skills in what they call "the art of transformation."

At the ninth annual event on Sunday, the frenzy of backstage activity was intense, with young men pinning wigs into place, adjusting fake breasts and creating hourglass figures by wrapping their waists multiple times with thick tape. Some spent up to five hours getting ready. After their painstaking preparation, contestants wearing 1950s-style cat eye makeup, pink lips and blonde pin curls performed song and dance numbers and strutted their stuff in sequined dresses created by some of Venezuela's top designers.

Beauty pageants have reached the level of national sport in Venezuela, which claims to have produced more international contest winners than any other country. Young women from poor neighborhoods pay huge sums to attend beauty schools with hopes of making it to the international pageant circuit. Young men compete in events that reward handsome faces and chiseled muscles.

The Miss Gay contest is less conventional, but still cleaves to some beauty contest norms, including evening wear and swimsuit competitions. All contestants have to be younger than 37 and stand at least 1.7 meters (5'6") tall.

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The winner of Sunday's event was 24-year-old social media coordinator Manuel Gonzalez, who competed as Argenis Gonzalez. In classic beauty queen style, he burst into tears after it was announced he had won as the representative of Carabobo state. "It's a great achievement to get to be the face of what is such a large community in Latin America, and even bigger in our country," Gonzalez said after the glittery, silvery crown was placed on his head. "And to have so many straight people cheering us on makes me feel really privileged."

Source: AP.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2015 7:13 pm 
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Guatemalan congress raises minimum age for marriage to 18
5 November 2015

GUATEMALA CITY (AP) -- Guatemala's congress voted Thursday to raise the minimum legal age for marriage to 18. It had been 14 for girls and 16 for boys.

The unicameral congress voted 87 to 15 to approve the change, which had been urged by children's rights groups to prevent child trafficking and teen pregnancies. However, legislators inserted a clause saying 16-year-old girls can marry with a judge's authorization in some cases.

Congressman Leonel Lira, who voted in favor of the bill, says the law will treat sex with underage youths as a form of rape. "This breaks with a mistaken tradition," Lira said. In some areas of Guatemala, girls are often spirited away from their homes by suitors at very young ages. UNICEF expert Juan Quinonez says there have been about 4,000 marriages a year in Guatemala involving girls ages 15 to 19. He says 4,700 girls from age 10 to 14 get pregnant every year.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2015 8:36 pm 
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Two women risk jail time for same-sex wedding in Costa Rica
9 November 2015

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People take part in a Gay Pride parade in San Jose, on June 30, 2013 (AFP Photo/Hector Retamal)

San José (AFP) - Same-sex weddings may be legal in a small but growing number of countries, but not in Costa Rica where two women who married, and their lawyer, face criminal charges, and having the union annulled.

The director of Costa Rica's Civil Registry, which records all in-country marriages and births, Luis Bolanos, said Monday he was referring the matter to prosecutors and seeking the annulment. The July wedding of Laura Florez-Estrada, a 28-year-old Spanish citizen living in Costa Rica, and Jazmin Elizondo, a 24-year-old Costa Rican, was registered without question because a Civil Registry clerical error on Elizondo's birth certificate gave her gender as "male." Both women said they would take legal action to prevent their union being scrapped, relying on other laws that protect against sexual discrimination.

The statute against same-sex marriages in Costa Rica provides for jail time of between two and six years for those who know they are breaking the law, and the annulment of the marriage. "We believe that these people were aware that a marriage between people of the same sex warrants a complaint, that parts of the Criminal Code might have been broken," Bolanos said. He added that he would be informing Elizondo that the gender mistake on her Registry record had been corrected.

The lawyer who drew up the marriage papers, Marco Castillo, said he had legally wed a woman to a man according to the documents he had. Castillo is also head of the Diversity Movement, which fights for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) rights in the country.

Twenty countries around the world have made, or are in the process of making, same-sex marriage legal. In the Americas, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina all permit such unions. Some of Mexico's states also have followed suit.

Source: Yahoo! AFP

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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 12:05 am 
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Argentina's first transgender police chief on duty
By LUIS ANDRES HENAO
12 May 2017

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) -- Analia Pasantino served in Argentina's federal police as a man for 20 years, then she came out as a transgender woman and was forced to resign.

She is smiling these days, though, beaming with pride to be wearing a police badge again. And the sign on her office door reads: "Chief." Nearly a decade after psychiatric reports said Pasantino suffered from an "irreconcilable" illness that made her unfit to serve, she was welcomed back to the police force this week and appointed deputy police commissioner in the judicial communications department.

"This is a milestone," Pasantino, 49, told the Associated Press on Thursday. "I'm the first transgender police chief in Latin America. It's an unprecedented and important step to show Latin America and the world that we are an open institution."

Argentina became a world leader in transgender rights in 2012 when it gave people the freedom to change their legal and physical gender identity simply because they want to, without having to undergo judicial, psychiatric and medical procedures. The government also legalized gay marriage in 2010. "The world has changed," Pasantino said. "You can live a life of gender identity and it's no longer necessary to live a double life."

Pasantino struggled with this duality long before the passing of the gender identity law. She joined the police force as a man in 1988 and became a decorated officer, a respected police spokesman and then the leader of an anti-narcotics team. But at home, she lived as a woman. Throughout this transition, she always had the loving support of her wife, Silvia Mauro.

When Pasantino began dressing in skirts and high heels, the couple went out at night through the garage door to avoid being spotted by the neighbors. They would drive around Buenos Aires, but Pasantino at first lacked the courage to get out of the car. "The decisive moment came when my wife finally told me: 'Either you step out or you'll never leave the house looking like this again. I've put up with you for three hours getting ready and putting on makeup.'"

Pasantino and Mauro were high school sweethearts and have been a couple for 31 years. Together, they fought against bureaucracy that initially blocked them from changing Pasantino's male name on their marriage certificate and obtaining their law degrees.

Pasantino, who has shoulder-length blonde hair, still wears the same engagement ring that she first wore as a man long ago. "She has backed me with everything," Pasantino said about Mauro, who is also a lawyer. "She has been my pillar of support."

Pasantino said she was forced to take a leave of absence from the police department after coming out as a transgender woman in 2008. Every three months, she would present a psychiatric evaluation hoping to rejoin the force, but a committee reviewing her case repeatedly extended her leave. "It was always seen as illness," she said. "As crude as it sounds, the final diagnosis was: a disturbance in gender identity that made me unrecoverable to the police force."

Then the leadership of the federal police changed and she won reinstatement, Pasantino said. She also credits the efforts of Mara Perez, a transgender woman who leads the diversity division at Argentina's security ministry. "Mara's efforts were priceless," Pasantino said. "When they said 'no' under previous governments, she kept insisting until she succeeded."

This week, Pasantino was flooded by messages of support from former colleagues and requests for interviews after she was welcomed back into the police force at a televised press conference with Argentina's security minister and the federal police chief. "At first I was a bit overwhelmed by so much attention. But I'm proud to tell this story," she said. "And I hope it helps others as well."

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 5:19 am 
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Honduras bans child marriage, no exceptions
13 July 2017

BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Lawmakers in Honduras voted unanimously to ban child marriage, making it illegal in the Central American nation for children under the age of 18 to get married under any circumstances.

The law passed on Tuesday raises the minimum marriage age to 18 from 16 and removes all exceptions for child marriage, meaning that girls and boys under 18 cannot get married even with the permission of their parents.

Belinda Portillo from children’s charity Plan International said Honduras had “made history” by passing the law in a country where one in four children are married before the age of 18. “The fight against child marriage is a strategic way of promoting the rights and empowerment of women in various areas, such as health, education, work, freedom from violence,” Portillo, Plan’s Honduras country director, said in a statement.

Enforcing the law will be hardest in indigenous communities and poor rural areas in Honduras where child marriage is most prevalent, campaigners say.

Often driven by poverty and cultural acceptance, child marriage usually involves a girl marrying an older man and deprives girls of education and opportunities, keeping them in poverty. Each year more than 15 million girls worldwide are married before they turn 18, campaign group Girls Not Brides says.

Experts say child brides are more likely to be victims of sexual and domestic abuse and become teenage mothers. Pregnancy and childbirth complications are the leading cause of death for girls aged 15 to 19 globally.

Portillo said banning child marriage in Honduras would give girls a chance to be better educated and increase their earnings, helping to boost the country’s annual gross domestic product by about 3.5 percent. In a report last month, the World Bank said child marriage will cost developing countries trillions of dollars by 2030, hampering global efforts to eradicate poverty.

Most Latin American countries ban marriage until 18, but many of them still allow children to get married at a younger age with the permission of parents or a judge. Campaigners hope other countries in Latin America will follow Honduras’s example. Lawmakers in the Dominican Republic - a country with the second highest rate of child marriage in the region - along with El Salvador are mulling proposed reforms to outlaw child marriage.

Reporting by Anastasia Moloney
Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:04 pm 
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El Salvador, Guatemala lawmakers pass bans on child marriage
By MARCOS ALEMAN
18 August 2017

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) -- El Salvador and Guatemala have joined a trend in clamping down on child marriage by passing legislation that would outlaw marriage with minors.

Legislation passed in both countries Thursday to ban such unions even in cases of parental consent or pregnancy. An El Salvador government survey in 2015 found that there were 22,361 minors between the ages of 12 and 17 who had married or lived in a common-law relationship. Six out of 10 of the minors who were in a relationship with an adult lived in the country's rural areas.

Zaira Navas, director of El Salvador's National Council on Childhood and Adolescence, said the previous law had allowed adults to avoid legal charges for sexual assault through marriage.

The United Nations' children's advocate UNICEF and other supporters applauded the change. "El Salvador's move to ban child marriage is great news, and an important step forward in the effort to end child marriage in Latin America and around the world," said Heather Barr, a senior researcher with Human Rights Watch. She said El Salvador was among the countries that committed under the 2016 Sustainable Development Goals to end child marriage by 2030.

"In many countries, there is a serious gap between laws on child marriage and enforcement - so it will be important to see what steps the El Salvador government will take to make sure that the new law translates into change on the ground and better protection for girls," Barr said in an email Friday.

The legislation in Guatemala, which will go into effect in a month, eliminates a provision that allowed judges to authorize marriages between adults and children 16 and older. Leonel Dubon, director of the Childhood Refuge, which cares for abused children, predicted it would help change prevalent macho attitudes. "A cultural pattern exists that permits giving girls to adults," Dubon said. "They continue seeing girls as objects of pleasure and not as having rights."

The new laws are part of a regional trend in Central America. In July, Honduras' legislature also unanimously passed a bill prohibiting the marriage of anyone younger than 18 even with parental consent or in pregnancy cases. Barr said Costa Rica has also reformed its laws on the issue.

According to UNICEF, 11 percent of girls aged 15 to 19 in Latin America and the Caribbean are currently married or in a union.

Associated Press writers Christopher Sherman in Mexico City and Sonia Perez D. in Guatemala City contributed to this report.
Source: AP

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 11:03 pm 
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Teenage girls turn to prostitution in Venezuela to fight starvation
by Ben Kew
3 November 2017

Growing numbers of young girls in Venezuela are selling their bodies for sex in exchange for food as the crisis-stricken country’s humanitarian crisis continues to worsen.

A report from the American Spanish-language channel Telemundo recounts a 13-year-old girl’s experience of the sex trade. “Neither my mother nor my father can give me the things I need, such as food or school necessities,” the girl said. “Now what we need is food, you know, you wake up with nothing to eat,” another child prostitute said. “I’ve been two weeks just eating plantains and with nothing — boiled plantains, fried plantains, boiled plantains, with nothing. So what am I going to do? Get to work.”

Oscar Misle, the director of the CECODAP, an organization seeking to prevent child abuse, said that approximately 45,000 young people had been forced to give up their ambitions to work as sex slaves or child prostitutes. The number of Venezuelans selling sex has risen exponentially in recent years, as people are forced into the industry as a means of survival. Women charge between 80,000 to 160,000 bolivares, the equivalent of two to four dollars an hour, although some can be found for under a dollar.

Thousands of young women have also fled the country to sell sex at higher rates elsewhere, primarily in neighboring Colombia, leading to a huge increase in human trafficking activity.

The growing levels of famine have also led to other extraordinary incidents of people searching for food, including cannibalism, eating stray dogs, and stealing zoo animals in order to feed themselves.

Socialist dictator Nicolás Maduro recently proposed the introduction of rabbit farming across many of the country’s major cities and has launched a campaign aiming to change people’s perception towards the animals by considering them as meat rather than animals.

The country’s chronic lack of products has led to the term “Maduro diet,” although government officials have denied shortages exist. An annual survey on Venezuelan living conditions released in May found that nearly 75 percent of people lost an average of 19 pounds as a result of malnutrition in the past year. 82 percent of households live in poverty. These figures are rapidly worsening amid continued economic meltdown and skyrocketing rates of inflation. According to latest exchange rates, Venezuela’s monthly minimum wage of 97,500 bolivars is now down to $2.37, equivalent to just over one cent an hour.

Source: Breitbart

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