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PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 10:03 pm 
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Oregon set to double recycling rate to 10 cents a can
By KRISTENA HANSEN
March 31, 2017

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Oregon was the first state in the nation to give 5-cent refunds for recycling used soda cans and glass bottles more than 45 years ago.

Today, with other recycling options now commonplace, this eco-trailblazing Pacific Northwest state is hoping to revamp the program by doubling that refund on bottled and canned water, soda, beer and malt beverages - regardless what their labels say.

Oregon's 1971 Bottle Bill - groundbreaking for its era in combating litter - has been replicated in nine other states plus the U.S. territory of Guam. Michigan is the only other with an across-the-board payout as high as 10 cents per bottle, although booze and other large bottles carry a 10-cent payout in California and 15 cents in Maine and Vermont.

The system was a big hit in those initial years. But as curbside recycling and pickup services were brought on board two decades later - not to mention inflationary effects on the nickel's value - the rates at which Oregonians cashed in their bottles and cans gradually tumbled from 90 percent averages to under 70 percent of all bottle sales statewide in 2014 and 2015.

That decline thus triggered the new 10-cent rate-a provision that lawmakers added in 2011 to the Bottle Bill. The higher refund goes into effect Saturday, and the most frugal of Oregonians have been hoarding bottles for months in anticipation of the roll-out.

Long lines are expected at the 20 bottle-redemption sites across the state as the roughly 2,000 or so grocery stores that participate in the refund program brace for a bustling weekend. Even the press pool at the state Capitol in Salem has been buying cases of water bottles and stockpiling the empties to pay for a pizza party.

Ted Ferrioli, Republican leader of the state Senate from John Day, Oregon, says he's seen some creative takes on the program by schools and community organizations to help raise money for kids to go to camp or 4-H.

"They put a horse trailer out with a sign on it and it fills up and then they take it in and cash it out," Ferrioli recalled with a chuckle.

Naysayers, meanwhile, are quick to criticize the higher amount as bad policy during a time of crisis for Oregon's upcoming budget, where jobs and taxes are on the line to help close a whopping $1.6 billion deficit.

Among the 10 Bottle Bill states, Oregon and Iowa differ in that private beverage industry, rather than state government, operates their bottle programs and claims all the unredeemed refunds.

Oregonians cashed in slightly more than 1 billion bottles and cans in 2015, roughly two-thirds of total sales that year, according to a 2017 report to the Legislature by the Oregon Liquor and Control Commission, which aids distributors in administering program operations.

That equates to almost $30 million in gross bottle refunds that Oregonians never redeemed, all of which stayed with local and national beverage distributors such as Pepsi and the Pendleton Bottle Company, plus others who participate in the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative.

Some of those funds help beverage distributors operate the program that involves transporting recyclables to processing sites and reimbursing grocery stores, which don't make a profit but are still required to accept empty containers and refund consumers.

But critics like Dan Meek, a Portland public interest attorney and spokesman for the Oregon Progressive Party, says at least some of that unclaimed cash would be better off going into state coffers for education, health care or other public services.

"This is how the programs work in California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, and Connecticut," he said. "New York retains 80 percent of unclaimed refunds; Michigan retains 75 percent. Oregon currently retains 0 percent."

More recently, distributors participating in the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative nonprofit are using the funds to build, operate and staff upscale stand-alone redemption sites, which lifts the burden away from grocery stores. The process has been slow-going, however, with pushback from local communities and land-use issues, although the co-op is now retrofitting huge shipping containers as an alternative.

Sen. Betsy Johnson, a Democrat from the small town of Scappoose, Oregon, northwest of Portland, said the shift away from grocery stores has been among her concerns about the system, which hampers smaller communities like hers. But, she and others respect that it's part of Oregon's identity.

"The Bottle Bill has been a beloved institution of Oregon," Johnson said. "The rationale was, we don't want this crap all over the roads and the beach, it's gross. And so if you give them money to take them back some place, everybody wins."

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 12:59 pm 
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Austria introduces green number plates and free parking for electric cars
3 April 2017

VIENNA (ANSA) - Austria is focusing on electric cars. Starting April 1st, a car licence plate written in green instead of black has been introduced, for cars with green all-wheel drive, thus making them easily recognisable in the event of traffic restriction due to pollution.

Moreover, in some cities, electric cars with green plates can park for free on the blue lines. The Austrian Government has also introduced a 4,000 euro incentive for the purchase of green cars, allocating 72 million euro. In recent weeks, South Tyrol has also presented a package of measures to support zero emission mobility with incentives (up to 4,000 euro for electric cars and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) and a network of charging stations throughout the province.

Source: ANSA

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 6:38 am 
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UAE's first solar-powered gas station opens in Dubai
26 April 2017

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) -- A government oil company in the United Arab Emirates says it has opened the country's first solar-powered gas station in Dubai.

The Dubai-owned Emirates National Oil Company said on Wednesday the service station on the city's main Sheikh Zayed Road thoroughfare is covered with solar panels that can generate up to 120 kilowatt hours. ENOC says that is about 30 percent more energy than the station needs, so the excess power is directed back into the city's electric grid.

Although it is OPEC's fourth biggest oil producer, the UAE has made a push to turn itself into a hub for renewable energy. It is building multiple solar farms and hosts the global headquarters of the International Renewable Energy Agency.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 11:43 pm 
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Dutch group says it will soon start cleaning up ocean trash
By MIKE CORDER
11 May 2017

UTRECHT, Netherlands (AP) -- A Dutch foundation aiming to rid the world's oceans of plastic waste says it will start cleaning up the huge area of floating junk known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch within the next 12 months, two years earlier than planned.

The Ocean Cleanup aims to use long-distance floating booms that act like coastlines to gather plastic as it drifts on or near the surface of the water while allowing sea life to pass underneath. The plan originally was to anchor the barriers to the sea bed with a system used by oil rigs, but the organization said Thursday it now will use anchors that float beneath the water's surface, making it much more efficient.

The Ocean Cleanup, founded by Dutch university dropout Boyan Slat, announced that testing of the first system will start off the U.S. West coast by the end of the year and barriers will be shipped to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch between California and Hawaii in the first half of 2018, two years ahead of the organization's earlier schedule. The patch is a huge area of the ocean where swirling currents concentrate the trash.

"At the ocean cleanup we always work with nature. So instead of going after the plastic, we let the plastic come to us, saving time, energy and cost," Slat, a shaggy-haired 22-year-old, told the Associated Press.

Floating barriers concentrate the plastic garbage at a central point where it can be fished out of the water and shipped back to dry land for recycling.

The organization discovered that the barriers are more efficient if they are allowed to slowly drift instead of anchoring them to the sea bed.

Free-floating barriers begin to act like the plastic they aim to snare, so "the cleanup systems will automatically gravitate to those places where most plastic is," Slat said. "And that now causes the efficiency to be a lot higher because there is just more plastic in front of these systems and therefore we can now clean up 50 percent of the patch in just five years' time."

The innovative system is the brainchild of Slat, who decided to dedicate himself to cleaning up the world's oceans after he went scuba diving in Greece at the age of 16 and saw more plastic bags than fish.

The young entrepreneur's system is making waves among America's super-rich philanthropists. Last month, his foundation announced it had raised $21.7 million in donations since November, clearing the way for large-scale trials at sea. Among donors were Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel.

Nancy Wallace, director of the Marine Debris Program at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said much of the garbage in the world's oceans is found throughout the water column - at different depths. That would likely put some of it out of reach of Slat's barriers.

However she applauded The Ocean Cleanup for bringing the issue to a broad public. "The more people are aware of it, the more they will be concerned about it," Wallace said. "My hope is that the next step is to say 'what can I do to stop it?' and that's where prevention comes in."

The organization's barriers don't catch tiny plastic particles floating in the ocean, but Slat says that by scooping up larger garbage like fishing nets, crates and other rubbish, they prevent those items breaking down into smaller particles that can be eaten by fish and other wildlife. "Of course we will never get every last piece of plastic out of the ocean," Slat said. "There will always be a size that's too small to clean up but it's really about cleaning up the bulk - as much as possible for as little costs as possible."

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 1:45 pm 
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Indian lawyer cleaned Mumbai city beach
28 May 2017

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MUMBAI, India (PTI) - A city-based lawyer, who was lauded today by Prime Minister Narendra Modi for cleanliness work he has done at the Versova beach here, thanked the prime minister, saying his words will act as a morale booster.

Afroz Shah, a 36-year-old lawyer at the Bombay High Court, was praised by Modi during the radio programme ‘Mann Ki Baat’ for the cleanliness work done by him and his team to transform the Versova beach. “A few days ago, you must have heard that the Versova beach in Mumbai, which was infamous for its filth has now transformed into a clean and beautiful beach. People toiled for about 80-90 weeks, unceasingly and turned Versova beach around by extracting thousand of tonnes of waste materials and today Versova beach is clean and beautiful,” Modi had said.

“This campaign was owned by Versova Residence volunteer or VRV. A gentleman called Afroz Shah started this mission from October, 2015 whole heartedly with all his might, slowly people started joining his bandwagon and turned into a people’s movement. “For this outstanding work, United Nations Environment Programme or UNEP awarded the ‘Champion of the Earth’ Award to Afroz Shah, and thus he has become the first Indian to achieve this distinction. I congratulate Afroz Shah, and felicitate this people’s movement. The manner in which he gathered the people of the area into a peoples collective and gave it the shape of a people’s movement in itself an inspiring example,” Modi had said.

An elated Shah told PTI that he was thankful to the prime minister for the kind words. “This has further encouraged me to expand my mission and I would like to replicate (it) at all the beaches across the country, and not only in Mumbai,” said Shah. The lawyer said he has taken an oath to continue cleaning the beaches on a mission mode. “I would continue till I am physically active or my limbs help me and I am confident to take a large number people along with me in my mission,” he added.

According to Shah, since the drive has been launched, his team has so far removed around 5.5 million kg of waste in 85 weeks from the Versova beach. “My team members go to the beach every Saturday and Sunday and collect the garbage and dump it near the points from where BMC (civic body) men take it to segregation centres,” Shah explained.

Source: PTI via Financial Express, India

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 12:33 pm 
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Berlin homes to be heated with energy from wind power
1 June 2017

BERLIN (AP) -- Swedish utility company Vattenfall is investing almost 100 million euros ($112 million) to build a power-to-heat facility in the German capital.

Vattenfall says the 120-megawatt thermal energy facility in Berlin's western district of Spandau aims to use wind power to provide heating to thousands of homes in the city of 3.5 million. Berlin has long used a system known as district heating to pump water heated in coal and gas-fired power plants directly into households.

Germany is expanding the use of renewable energy sources as part of its effort to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decades. The country already generates a large amount of electricity from wind power plants in the north of the country, some of which will now be used to heat Berlin homes.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:12 pm 
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Swedish carmaker Volvo to phase out combustion engine
5 July 2017

Berlin (dpa) - Swedish carmaker Volvo announced plans on Wednesday to phase out the internal combustion engine (ICE) and increasingly move towards electric engines in its vehicles.

"This announcement marks the end of the solely combustion engine-powered car," Volvo chief Hakan Samuelsson said in a statement. The announcement represents one of the most significant moves by any carmaker to embrace electric engines. "This means that there will in future be no Volvo cars without an electric motor, as pure ICE cars are gradually phased out and replaced by ICE cars that are enhanced with electrified options," Samuelsson added.

Volvo wants to produce five electric models between 2019 and 2021. These are to be accompanied by a number of hybrid models with both electric and internal combustion technology in the firm's vehicle portfolio. Samuelsson said the move was driven in part by increasing consumer demand for electric motors. Volvo plans to sell 1 million electric vehicles by 2025.

Source: dpa

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:02 pm 
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Britain to ban sale of new diesel and gasoline cars by 2040
By LEONORE SCHICK
26 July 2017

LONDON (AP) -- Britain will ban the sale of new cars and vans using diesel and gasoline starting in 2040 as part of a sweeping plan to tackle air pollution that experts say is feasible, if ambitious.

The government announcement Wednesday follows similar moves in France and Norway and comes amid a global debate on how quickly electric and hybrid cars can replace internal combustion engines. Traditional engines running on diesel and gasoline are still popular with consumers as they're relatively cheap and do not face some limits of electric cars, such as a limited range. But with the technology for electric and hybrid cars improving, governments are trying to set long-term goals to help guide the investments of automakers and, ultimately, consumers' choices.

Britain's government said it would put up 255 million pounds ($326 million) to help local communities address diesel pollution. The measures are part of a clean air strategy that authorities published only days before a deadline mandated by the High Court. The money is part of a 3 billion pound effort to clean up the air.

The government plan includes the consideration of a targeted scrappage scheme for drivers who need support and to provide an incentive to switch vehicles. It also aims for "almost every car and van on the road to be a zero emission vehicle by 2050," the government said in its overview of the program.

Frederik Dahlmann, an assistant professor of global energy at Warwick Business School, described the plans as "ambitious but realistic." "I am confident enough that the industry will be able to respond within that timeline," he said.

It would, however, require significant investment in in the infrastructure, such as a network of charging stations, that is required to make electric and hybrid vehicles more widely popular. Another point of focus is improving batteries so that they last longer.

While carmaker Volvo has committed to switching to only selling electric and hybrid cars within two years, most major manufacturers say that traditional engines will remain an important part of their sales for years. On Wednesday, Daimler CEO Dieter Zetsche said that diesel engines can help lower overall carbon dioxide emissions because they emit less than gasoline cars. Environmental activists note, however, that diesels emit more nitrogen oxide, which is harmful for people's health.

So far, growth in electric and hybrid vehicle sales has been strong, but from a low base. Analytics company IHS Markit estimate that sales of internal combustion engines are expected to fall from 17 million vehicles in 2015 across the EU to about 12 million in 2025, which would still make up a significant portion of cars on the road. Meanwhile, sales of electric and hybrid cars are expected to increase from about 350,000 in 2015 to 1.85 million by 2025.

Associated Press Writer Dee Ann Durbin contributed to this story.
Source: AP

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:24 am 
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For electric cars to take off, they'll need place to charge
By DEE-ANN DURBIN
August 11, 2017

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In this Friday, April 14, 2017, file photo, a security guard moves past an electric vehicle charging station in Beijing. Momentum is building worldwide for electric cars thanks to rising government fuel economy standards and climate concerns. Automakers are jumping on board. But selling those cars will be difficult unless the world builds more charging stations. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

DETROIT (AP) -- Around the world, support is growing for electric cars. Automakers are delivering more electric models with longer range and lower prices, such as the Chevrolet Bolt and the Tesla Model 3.

China has set aggressive targets for electric vehicle sales to curb pollution; some European countries aim to be all-electric by 2040 or sooner. Those lofty ambitions face numerous challenges, including one practical consideration for consumers: If they buy electric cars, where will they charge them?

The distribution of public charging stations is wildly uneven around the globe. Places with lots of support from governments or utilities, like China, the Netherlands and California, have thousands of public charging outlets. Buyers of Tesla's luxury models have access to a company-funded Supercharger network. But in many places, public charging remains scarce. That's a problem for people who need to drive further than the 200 miles or so that most electric cars can travel. It's also a barrier for the millions of people who don't have a garage to plug in their cars overnight. "Do we have what we need? The answer at the moment is, 'No,'" says Graham Evans, an analyst with IHS Markit.

Take Norway, which has publicly funded charging and generous incentives for electric car buyers. Architect Nils Henningstad drives past 20 to 30 charging stations each day on his 22-mile (35-kilometer) commute to Oslo. He works for the city and can charge his Nissan Leaf at work; his fiancee charges her Tesla SUV at home or at one of the world's largest Tesla Supercharger stations, 20 miles away.

It's a very different landscape in New Berlin, Wisconsin, where Jeff Solie relies on the charging system he rigged up in his garage to charge two Tesla sedans and a Volt. Solie and his wife don't have chargers at their offices, and the nearest Tesla Superchargers are 45 miles (72 kilometers) away. "If I can't charge at home, there's no way for me to have electric cars as my primary source of transportation," says Solie, who works for the media company E.W. Scripps.

The uneven distribution of chargers worries many potential electric vehicle owners. It's one reason electric vehicles make up less than 1 percent of cars on the road. "Humans worst-case their purchases of automobiles. You have to prove to the consumer that they can drive across the country, even though they probably won't," says Pasquale Romano, the CEO of ChargePoint, one of the largest charging station providers in North America and Europe.

Romano says there's no exact ratio of the number of chargers needed per car. But he says workplaces should have around 2.5 chargers for every employee and retail stores need one for every 20 electric cars. Highways need one every 50 to 75 miles, he says. That suggests a lot of gaps still need to be filled.

Automakers and governments are pushing to fill them. The number of publicly available, global charging spots grew 72 percent to more than 322,000 last year, the International Energy Agency said. Navigant Research expects that to grow to more than 2.2 million by 2026; more than one-third of those will be in China.

Tesla Inc. - which figured out years ago that people wouldn't buy its cars without roadside charging - is doubling its global network of Supercharger stations to 10,000 this year. BMW, Daimler, Volkswagen and Ford are building 400 fast-charging stations in Europe. Volkswagen is building hundreds of stations across the U.S. as part of its settlement for selling polluting diesel engines. Even oil-rich Dubai, which just got its first Tesla showroom, has more than 50 locations to charge electric cars.

But there are pitfalls. There are different types of charging stations, and no one knows the exact mix drivers will eventually need. A grocery store might spend $5,000 for an AC charge point, which provides a car with 5 to 15 miles of range in 30 minutes. But once most cars get 200 or 300 miles per charge, slow chargers are less necessary. Electric cars with longer range need fast-charging DC chargers along highways, but DC chargers cost $35,000 or more.

That uncertainty makes it difficult to make money setting up chargers, says Lisa Jerram, an associate director with Navigant Research. For at least the next three to five years, she says, deep-pocketed automakers, governments and utilities will be primarily responsible for building charging infrastructure.

There's also the question of who will meet the needs of apartment dwellers. San Francisco, Shanghai and Vancouver, Canada, are now requiring new homes and apartment buildings to be wired for EV charging.

But without government support, plans for charging stations can falter. In Michigan, a utility's $15 million plan to install 800 public charging stations was scrapped in April after state officials and ChargePoint objected. Solie, the electric car owner in Wisconsin, likes Europe's approach: Governments should set bold targets for electric car sales and let the private sector meet the need. "If the U.S. were to send up a flare that policy was going to change... investments would become very attractive," he says.

AP Writers David McHugh in Frankfurt, Joe McDonald in Beijing and Aya Batrawy in Dubai contributed.
Source: AP

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