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Do you think genital surgery for vanity purposes is a good idea?
Yes 50%  50%  [ 2 ]
No 50%  50%  [ 2 ]
Only if it carries minimal health risks 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 4
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 1:00 pm 
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Is cosmetic surgery the new acceptable face of womanhood?
by Karen Kay
Sunday, 28 June 2015

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More women in the UK are turning to cosmetic procedures due to increased availability, a rise in disposable income and social pressure. Photograph: Image Source/REX

Here is a confession: at 44 years of age, I have the face and body I deserve.

My upper arms are fleshy and fulsome, bearing no resemblance to the sleek undulations of gym-honed muscle I paraded in my twenties. My post-caesarean belly protrudes over the waistband of my skinny jeans, pleading for the forgiving maternity styles I wore with pride eight years ago as I carried my then unborn daughter.

I have a bumpy nose that looks fine from the front, but makes me shudder if I see it in profile. I have a “well-defined jawline” – or a pointy chin, if you ask for my description. There are a few furrows on my brow, lines around my eyes, and the outsize bags beneath them would do Joan Collins proud checking in at Heathrow airport. My complexion reflects more than three decades of suffering from acne. In short, my face is, well, my face. It tells an honest story of a life lived. My life.

And there’s the rub. There shouldn’t be anything unusual in that but, increasingly, I’m aware that I’m in the minority when I mix in certain circles. Arriving at some social events or work appointments, I find unfamiliar faces looking back at me from people whom I know well. These are women who appear one day with startled expressions, unable to smile warmly as they used to, their skin taught, waxy and translucent – like glassine paper.

Having “work” done is the new norm, you see, and I am conscious that, while I am content to look my age and confidently declare myself an intervention-free zone, I frequently stand out from the scalpel-ed, Botox-ed crowd as the one “who doesn’t”. This is not some self-indulgent plea for validation but an observation that the Stepford-style masses are becoming the acceptable face of womanhood. The insidious march of cosmetic intervention in everyday life has concerned me for some time and then last week I read a piece in Time magazine confirming its alarming prevalence in the US.

“You’re going to have to do it. And not all that long from now,” the article states. “Probably not a full-on, general anaesthesia bone-shaving or muscle-slicing. But almost definitely some injections into your face. Very likely a session of fat-melting in some areas and then possibly moving it to some other parts that use plumping. Not because you hate yourself, fear ageing or are vain. You’re going to get a cosmetic procedure for the same reason you wear make-up: because every other woman is.”

No way, I thought to myself, and ploughed on, indignant. It proved sobering reading: in the US, doctors performed more than 15m cosmetic procedures last year, a 13% increase on 2011 and more than twice as many as in 2000. Dermatologists are no longer considered to be medical clinicians, but beauticians, with 83% of them providing Botox or similar treatments. What was once the preserve of Joan Rivers and a handful of Ladies Who Lunch in Beverley Hills is now accessible to secretaries in Salt Lake City, who nip into the local medi-spa in their lunch hour for a manicure and a facial filler. That quick “fix” offers a euphoric high that soon wears off and sees them coming back for a more. I believe that cosmetic intervention is addictive and, because we gradually lose sight of the person who once looked back at us in the mirror, all perspective starts to go.

“I think people chase compliments and once we start getting those, we want more,” says Dr Frances Prenna Jones, a London-based cosmetic doctor who counts a plethora of magazine beauty editors and celebrities including Davina McCall and Louise Redknapp as clients. “Most women come to me and their concern is that they look ‘tired’. They might not feel tired on the inside but they want the outside to reflect how they feel. Increasingly, I am using vitamin injections to give a natural, fresh-faced radiant appearance. Volume replacement (using hyaluronic acid) is popular, too, but you need to take into account the naturally changing proportions of the face. If what you see is markedly different to what you expect, then it jars.”

TV presenter and journalist Anne Robinson, herself no stranger to the cosmetic surgeon’s scalpel, says “anything that allows women to feel better about themselves is worth it”. And clearly, many of her compatriots are with her on that one. According to the most recent figures from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, which represents one in three cosmetic surgeons in the UK, 50,122 surgical procedures were performed here in 2013, excluding walk-in treatments such as Botox. The audit noted an “impressive double-digit rise in all cosmetic procedures”, and that not a single individual procedure saw a decrease on the year. The Department of Health predicted in 2013 that the value of the cosmetic surgery industry in the UK would rise from £2.3bn in 2010 to £3.6bn this year.

Katharine Wright, assistant director of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, is setting up a working party to explore the increasing use of cosmetic procedures and is linking with the Beauty Demands network to assess the pressures of beauty ideals in society. “The Nuffield Council hosted a workshop on ‘professionals, practitioners and beauty norms’,” she explains. “We brought together academic experts on body image and fashion, psychologists, philosophers, lawyers, surgeons and GPs to debate the role of professionals in responding to the changing requirements of ‘beauty’ and the consequent changing uses of procedures that have traditionally been regarded as ‘medical’ in order to attempt to achieve beauty norms.”

If we simply accept these “ideals” as purported by the media, and go to such great lengths and take risks to conform to them, what are the implications? With society’s compulsion to share selfies, often distorted using photo-manipulation software and always curated to display our “best self” – whatever that is – is this tsunami of cosmetic surgery just the next phase in a vanity-obsesssed culture?

“Over a very short period of time, what is considered normal and required practice in terms of ‘routine maintenance’ has changed dramatically,” says ethicist Professor Heather Widdows at Birmingham University, who is researching her book Perfect Me! “The assumption that a beautiful, more perfect self is a happier, more successful self is deeply ingrained in popular discourse and the language used is exceptionally value laden: we are urged to be ‘the best we can be’ and to strive for our ‘best selves’. We should do this because we’re ‘worth it’ – the implication being that if we don’t, we are culpable and blameworthy for ‘letting ourselves go’,” she says.

Polly Vernon, author of Hot Feminist, believes that women have the right to choose and take ownership of their appearance. “But I would say that at this point in time women are succumbing to cosmetic surgery because they feel a pressure to,” she says. “When we inject our faces with stuff, that doesn’t come from the same place as putting on a colourful lipstick. We are navigating a new world, where we are much more conscious of our image, and we must own it and delight in it, rather than do things because of social pressure. Appearance should be an extension of who you are, not about trying to be someone you think society wants you to be.”

Recent findings by the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons identified a range of factors driving aspirations for cosmetic surgery: 53% of those who have had surgery believe celebrity cosmetic treatments had made it more aspirational, and 45% felt there was social pressure to consider it.

“I do hear women talking about the pressure to look good,” says Susan Harmsworth, founder and chairman of beauty company ESPA, who recently celebrated her 70th birthday and proudly claims she is regularly mistaken for a woman in her 50s – without having done anything other than led a healthy lifestyle with regular facial massages and skincare regime. “I know lots of high-profile, successful, intelligent women who have had work done, especially in the City, in banking and law, because they feel they need to look a certain way in the workplace, but once you start messing with your face, you start to look strange.”

With a seven-year-old daughter, I fear for the expectations of the next generation of women, who are likely to have little respect for the glorious beauty of age and the natural lines that come with wisdom.

Psychologist Ros Taylor, author of Confidence at Work, says: “The availability and accessibility of cosmetic procedures, the lack of stigma about having work done and the rise in women’s disposable income has meant the gateway is clear for this to become normalised. And it is only going to increase. I feel a little like King Canute seeing this wave coming and being unable to stop it. “Women are always blaming themselves for their lack of success, or not being tall enough, slim enough, beautiful enough. We constantly compare and contrast ourselves to other women, and although we are mostly fine as we are, we constantly desire to be different. The psychological impact of seeing someone different in the mirror can’t be underestimated.”

It is this broader impact of cosmetic intervention that Dr Mark Henley, of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons,, says led to the organisation’s Think Over Before You Make Over campaign to educate the public on safe cosmetic surgery. “One of the things we have to do is give people a reality check on what are normal human behaviours and values, and what is social pressure.

“They may have perfectly reasonable reasons for wanting surgery, but we mustn’t enthusiastically accelerate them towards the theatre as a commercial commodity. We must get it right in terms of counselling, preparation and information about potential risk and benefits. We need to ensure the patient has a good mental insight and understanding of the limitations of proposed surgery, and they have to be in the right frame of mind: no divorce or deaths, which make them emotionally unstable and vulnerable. If I think someone is addicted to the high of procedures, I want them to see a psychologist or their general practitioner. No one ever said Margaret Thatcher or the Queen should have a facelift. If in doubt, don’t. That’s a really good starting point.”

SURGICAL STATISTICS

  • Women accounted for 90.5% of cosmetic procedures in the UK in 2013, with a total of 45,365 procedures, according to figures from BAAPS.
  • Breast augmentation was the most popular procedure, with 11,123 procedures - up 13% on 2012. Blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) was the second most popular cosmetic procedure, followed by face or neck lifts in third place.
  • The number of liposuction procedures rose by 43% year on year, 2012-2013.
  • The vast majority of cosmetic surgery is carried out in the private sector and the law currently allows any qualified doctor – surgeon or otherwise – to perform cosmetic surgery without undertaking further training or gaining additional qualifications.
  • The Royal College of Surgeons is working on new certification protocols to be introduced in 2016, which will identify those surgeons who have the appropriate skills and experience to provide cosmetic surgery.

Source: The Observer UK.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:23 pm 
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Former Florida surgeon accused of mutilating man's penis
August 5, 2015

TAMARAC, Fla. (AP) -- A South Florida patient says his penis was deformed by a former surgeon who did not have a license to operate.

Multiple media outlets report that 60-year-old Mark D. Schreiber of Tamarac was arrested Friday on a charge of unlicensed practice of health care, causing serious injury. Hialeah police say the unidentified patient paid Schreiber in February to remove a material that had been injected into his organ to make it longer and thicker.

Authorities say the man who performed the initial procedures, 48-year-old Nery C. Gonzalez, is wanted on the same charge. The patient says his penis is now severely deformed and is unable to function sexually.

Schreiber was given a two-year sentence in 2008 on similar charges of unlicensed practicing. It's unclear if he has an attorney.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 7:18 pm 
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Man with 'bionic penis' reveals he had an erection for TWO weeks after surgery - but says his new manhood has 'changed his life'
By Madlen Davies
14 September 2015

A man fitted with a ‘bionic penis’ - after losing his own in a freak road accident - has revealed he had an erection for two weeks following the surgery.

Mohammed Abad lost his penis and testicle when he was run over by a car at age six.

But last month surgeons finally fitted him with an eight-inch penis implant. The contraption - complete with 'on' and 'off' buttons in his testicles to pump it up or deflate it - was made from the flesh of his arm and fitted by surgeons at University College London.

Today Mr Abad gave an honest interview to ITV’s This Morning programme about how his new manhood has changed his life, and how he now hopes to lose his virginity.

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Mohammed Abad, who was recently fitted with a ‘bionic penis’ after losing his own in a freak road accident, revealed he had an erection for two weeks following the surgery on ITV's This Morning (pictured)

The 43-year-old revealed he had an erection for a whole fortnight after the surgery. ‘I got out of hospital on the 10th of July and got a train back up to Scotland. I had to keep it erect for two weeks,’ he told presenters Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby. ‘I had to do that for it to heal, because that’s the way it works. I managed to do something to not get noticed.’

Mr Abad was pushed into the road as a child, falling under a moving car which dragged him for 600 yards, resulting in serious injuries to his genitals and thighs. His penis was completely destroyed, along with his left testicle.

Before having the implant fitted, he admitted he was a ‘nervous wreck’. He told This Morning: ‘I didn’t want to speak to anybody, I just wanted to get myself away from everybody. I’m filling with tears just talking about it. It really hits a nerve. But now I’ve been through it, I’m comfortable with it. I can talk about it to anybody. It’s [the psychological impact] huge. It’s totally changed my life.’

It took surgeons at University College London three years to mould his new penis using skin taken from his arm. Over the past three years he has had a total of 119 operations and one final 11-hour procedure to fit the inflation system.

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This Morning's Dr Dawn Harper explains that Mr Abad's has a pump in his testicles which he can use to inflate his penis, and another which causes it to deflate after use

    HOW DOES THE 'BIONIC PENIS' WORK?

  • The sexual device contains two tubes which fill up using liquid from his stomach, allowing him to maintain an erection.
  • It has a button in his testicles which he can press to pump it up, as well as another button which drains the penis after use, so it deflates.

    Image
  • The sexual device contains two tubes which fill up using liquid from his stomach, allowing him to maintain an erection. This process is activated by 'on' and 'off' buttons in his testicles which pump it up and deflate it
  • Moulding and attaching it took three years, with doctors from University College London using a skin graft from his arm to line its shaft. The skin and fat from his forearm was removed to create the new penis, which was then attached during an 11-hour operation.
  • Along with giving him a sex life it has also allowed him to pass urine standing up for the first time. Now, he hopes to finally lose his virginity.

‘My old penis didn’t go to waste – my surgeon used it to make my scrotum,’ he said. When questioned about whether his bionic penis has the same sensation as other men’s, he said he doesn’t believe it does. ‘It doesn’t feel like another man would feel,’ he said. ‘I’m totally different.’ It’s not like if I sit and watch something, I get sensation. But once it’s there, there’s no holding me back, if you know what I mean.’

Last month Mr Abad announced he is single, after his wife left him last year before he had the bionic penis fitted. This was due to the fact she became tired of waiting for him to solve his affliction so they could make love and have children, he claims. He revealed he kept the fact he had no penis or testicle a secret from his wife until their wedding night.

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The skin and fat from Mr Abad's forearm (pictured) was removed to create the new penis, which was then attached during an 11-hour operation

The pair wed two years ago but she only found out about his absence of manhood on their first night as a married couple. Now, Mr Abad says he will be honest with women in future. He said: ‘I’ve learnt the hard way, to be honest. I’ve got something to show for it now.’ Mr Abad still has one testicle, which means he can produce sperm and is able to father a child. He says having children is ‘a possibility’. ‘I’ve got an outpatient appointment on the 1st October when my doctor is going to be discussing what he’s going to do in future. But he’s knows what my testosterone levels are, he knows what my sperm count is.’ Turning to Mr Schofield, he said: ‘It’s probably better than yours.’

Mr Scholfield, looking a little embarrassed turned to the camera and said: ‘I’m sure it is. Sometimes you just don’t know what to say.’ Concluding the interview, Mr Abad said he was looking forward to losing his virginity and finding love. ‘I feel brilliant,’ he said. ‘I’m still a virgin but I’m working on that you know.’

Source: Daily Mail UK.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2015 5:35 pm 
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One cosmetic surgery every two minutes for Brazil men: report
November 1, 2015 11:43 AM

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The most popular operation for Brazilian males is breast reduction with 80 percent of surgeries performed on adolescents, followed by liposuction and eyelid procedures, according to SBCP (AFP Photo/Michael Buckner)

Rio de Janeiro (AFP) - Once taboo, cosmetic surgery for Brazilian men is advancing at a rapid pace, with one male going under the knife every two minutes, experts said in an article Sunday.

Plastic surgery quadrupled among men from 72,000 to 276,000 operations annually from 2009 to 2014, a study by the Brazilian Society of Plastic Surgery said. That's an average of 31.5 operations per hour, according to an article on the study in the newspaper Estado de Sao Paulo.

The main reason for the change is cultural, with a lowering of bias against men undergoing these procedures, S.P Luiz Henrique Ishida, director of SBCP, told Estado. "Additionally, in Brazil, cosmetic surgery is seen as a popular process and the country is a world leader in this field," he added.

Last year, 712,902 cosmetic procedures were performed across the country, with participation by men climbing from 12 percent of the total in 2009 to 22.5 percent in 2014. The most popular operation for males is breast reduction with 80 percent of surgeries performed on adolescents, followed by liposuction and eyelid procedures, according to SBCP. Most patients are between the age of 20 and 50, but a larger portion of seniors still in the workforce may be contributing to the rise.

"A tired look is seen as a negative thing in the labor market," said the director of SBCP, which comprises some 5,800 surgeons. "There are patients who are 70 who have operations because they have an active social life or to appear more compatible with their partner" who is younger, he said.

Source: Yahoo! AFP.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2015 4:40 pm 
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Penis Transplants Being Planned to Help Wounded Troops
6 December 2015
By DENISE GRADY

Image
From left, Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee, Dr. Richard J. Redett and Dr. Gerald Brandacher at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore this month. They hope to perform what will be the first penis transplant in the United States within a year. Credit Lexey Swall for The New York Times

Within a year, maybe in just a few months, a young soldier with a horrific injury from a bomb blast in Afghanistan will have an operation that has never been performed in the United States: a penis transplant.

The organ will come from a deceased donor, and the surgeons, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, say they expect it to start working in a matter of months, developing urinary function, sensation and, eventually, the ability to have sex.

From 2001 to 2013, 1,367 men in military service suffered wounds to the genitals in Iraq or Afghanistan, according to the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. Nearly all were under 35 and were hurt by homemade bombs, commonly called improvised explosive devices, or I.E.D.s. Some lost all or part of their penises or testicles — what doctors call genitourinary injuries.

Missing limbs have become a well-known symbol of these wars, but genital damage is a hidden wound — and, to many, a far worse one — cloaked in shame, stigma and embarrassment.

Image

“These genitourinary injuries are not things we hear about or read about very often,” said Dr. W. P. Andrew Lee, the chairman of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins. “I think one would agree it is as devastating as anything that our wounded warriors suffer, for a young man to come home in his early 20s with the pelvic area completely destroyed.”

Only two other penis transplants have been reported in medical journals: a failed one in China in 2006 and a successful one in South Africa last year. The surgery is considered experimental, and Johns Hopkins has given the doctors permission to perform 60 transplants. The university will monitor the results and decide whether to make the operation a standard treatment. The risks, like those of any major transplant operation, include bleeding, infection and the possibility that the medicine needed to prevent transplant rejection will increase the odds of cancer.

Dr. Lee cautioned that patients should be realistic and not “think they can regain it all.” But doctors can give the recipients a range of what to expect. “Some hope to father children,” Dr. Lee said. “I think that is a realistic goal.”

Just the penis will be transplanted, not the testes, where sperm are produced. So if a transplant recipient does become a father, the child will be his own genetically, not the offspring of the donor. Men who have lost testicles completely may still be able to have penis transplants, but they will not be able to have biological children.

In the 2006 case in China, the recipient asked that the transplant be removed a few weeks after the operation because of “apparent psychological rejection,” the Johns Hopkins doctors said, adding that in photographs the transplant had patches of dead and peeling skin, possibly from inadequate blood flow. But the South African recipient, a young man whose penis had been amputated because of a botched circumcision, recently became a father, said Dr. Gerald Brandacher, the scientific director of the reconstructive transplantation program at Johns Hopkins.

Doctors who treat young men wounded in combat say that no matter how bad their other injuries are, the first thing the men ask about when they wake up from surgery is whether their genitals are intact. “Our young male patients would rather lose both legs and an arm than have a urogenital injury,” said Scott E. Skiles, the polytrauma social work supervisor at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.

Sgt. First Class Aaron Causey, who lost both legs, one testicle and part of the other from an I.E.D. while in Afghanistan with the Army in 2011, said the testicular damage was the most troubling of his injuries. The wound to his groin involved only the testicles. “I don’t care who you are — military, civilian, anything — you have an injury like this, it’s more than just a physical injury,” Sergeant Causey said.

Some doctors have criticized the idea of penis transplants, saying they are not needed to save the patient’s life. But Dr. Richard J. Redett, director of pediatric plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins, said, “If you meet these people, you see how important it is.” “To be missing the penis and parts of the scrotum is devastating,” Dr. Redett said. “That part of the body is so strongly associated with your sense of self and identity as a male. These guys have given everything they have.”

Jeffrey Kahn, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins, said that at a conference convened last year by the Bob Woodruff Foundation, which aids injured veterans, wives said that genitourinary injuries had eroded their husbands’ sense of manhood and identity. Most telling, Dr. Kahn said, was that the men themselves attended the conference but did not speak about their wounds.

Although surgeons can create a penis from tissue taken from other parts of a patient’s own body — an operation being done more and more on transgender men — erections are not possible without an implant, and the implants too often shift position, cause infection or come out, Dr. Redett said. For that reason, he said, the Johns Hopkins team thinks transplants are the best solution when the penis cannot be repaired or reconstructed. If the transplant fails, he said, it will be removed, leaving the recipient no worse off than before the surgery.

But can men — and their partners — get used to the idea that their most intimate part came from another man’s body?

The best analogy is hand transplants, Dr. Brandacher said, because hands are personal and distinctive — a transplant that the recipient can see, unlike a kidney or liver.

“I can tell you from all the patients — and I’ve been involved since 1998 — every single one, after surgery, look at the graft, try to move it and they immediately call it ‘my hand,’ ” Dr. Brandacher said. “They immediately incorporate it as part of their body. I would assume, extrapolating, that this is going to be the same for this kind of transplant.” Dr. Kahn said it was essential that the families of organ donors be asked specifically for permission to use the penis, just as special permission was required for face and hand transplants. It is not assumed that people willing to donate kidneys or livers will also consent to having their loved one’s genitals removed. The surgeons want a relatively young donor to increase the odds that the transplanted organ will function sexually.

For now, the operation is being offered only to men injured in combat, Dr. Lee said. It is not available to transgender people, though that may change in the future.

“Once this becomes public and there’s some sense that this is successful and a good therapy, there will be all sorts of questions about whether you will do it for gender reassignment,” Dr. Kahn said. “What do you say to the donor? A 23-year-old wounded in the line of duty has a very different sound than somebody who is seeking gender reassignment.”

For a transplant to be possible, certain nerves and blood vessels have to be intact in the recipient, as does the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the body. The screening process, as for any organ transplant, also involves making sure that the candidate is psychologically ready, understands the risks and benefits, can stick to the regimen of anti-rejection medicine and has a family support network.

A few initial candidates are being evaluated. “We have one that we’re moving forward with, and we’re very far in the process,” Dr. Redett said, adding that he expected the patient to be put on the transplant waiting list soon. “That means you are really only waiting for a donor.”

A spokeswoman for Johns Hopkins said the candidates and their families had declined to be interviewed. The university will pay for the first transplant, Dr. Lee said, adding that he had asked the Defense Department for money to cover more operations. The surgeons are donating their time, he said. Comparing the surgery to hand transplants performed at Johns Hopkins, he estimated the cost at $200,000 to $400,000 per operation. He said the Department of Veterans Affairs would pay for the drug that the men will need to prevent transplant rejection.

The project has been years in the making, the doctors said, with extensive research and practice surgery on cadavers. Some of the work involved injecting brightly colored food dyes into the cadavers to map out the circulatory system in the penis. Dr. Lee said the research had found previously unknown aspects of its blood supply, which will be critical to the transplant’s success.

The operation should take about 12 hours, Dr. Lee said. The surgeons will connect two to six nerves, and six or seven veins and arteries, stitching them together under a microscope.

For the first few weeks after the surgery, a catheter will be left in place to drain urine. Sexual function will take longer to develop — probably a few months, Dr. Lee said. He said nerves would grow from the recipient into the transplant at a rate of about one inch per month, so the timing will depend in part on the extent of the recipient’s injuries and how far the nerves need to go. After the transplant, the men will begin taking anti-rejection medication and will need it for the rest of their lives. Such drugs work by suppressing the immune system and can increase the odds of infections and cancer.

To minimize the risks, the Johns Hopkins team has found a way to use just one drug, rather than the three usually needed for other transplants. At the time of the penis transplant, they will treat the recipient with a medication that reduces immune system cells. About two weeks later, he will receive an infusion of stem cells from the donor. The infusion dials back the tendency of the recipient’s immune system to attack the transplant, and just one anti-rejection drug, tacrolimus, is then enough to keep it in check. Doctors have used this technique successfully in patients who have had hand transplants.

Ultimately, the goal is to restore function, not just form or appearance, Dr. Brandacher emphasized. That is what the recipients want most. “They say, ‘I want to feel whole again,’ ” Dr. Brandacher said. “It’s very hard to imagine what it means if you don’t feel whole. There are very subtle things that we take for granted that this transplant is able to give back.”

Alain Delaquérière contributed research.
Source: New York Times.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:51 pm 
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victor wrote:
Fake doc injected cement in woman's rear
20 November 2011
By KELLI KENNEDY

Image
Oneal Ron Morris

MIAMI (AP) - A woman who wanted to work at a nightclub started searching for someone who could perform plastic surgery at a cheap price to give her a curvier body.

Police say what she found was a woman posing as a doctor who filled her buttocks with cement, mineral oil and flat-tire sealant.

The suspect — who police say was born a man and identifies as a woman — apparently performed the surgery on herself, and investigators say she may have victimized others. Oneal Ron Morris, 30, was arrested Friday after a year on the lam and has been charged with practicing medicine without a license with serious bodily injury.

Police photos show Morris as a small-framed woman with bee-stung pouty lips, arched eyebrows, oversized hoop earrings — and a large backside. She was released from jail on bond. A phone listing for Morris could not be found, and it's unclear if she has an attorney.

Miami Gardens Police Sgt. Bill Bamford said Sunday that Morris bounced from house to house for a year, driving a black Mercedes and staying out of investigators' sight "like a ghost." An officer drove by one of those possible houses nearly every day on his way to work and saw the car outside on Friday, and he arrested Morris soon after.

The victim, who is not being named due to medical privacy laws, paid $700 for a series of injections in May 2010. She was referred to Morris by a friend. Morris injected some type of tube in several sites around her bottom, pumping it full of a toxic concoction. Morris reassured the woman when the pain became too intense, police said.

Bamford said Morris told the woman, "Oh don't worry, you'll be fine. We just keep injecting you with the stuff and it all works itself out.'"

Bamford said the victim was reluctant to come forward. She quickly went to two South Florida hospitals due to severe abdominal pain and infected sores on her buttocks accompanied by flu-like symptoms. But she left each time, too embarrassed to tell doctors what she'd done. Her mother eventually took her to a hospital on Florida's west coast, where alarmed doctors pressed her for information. They alerted the Department of Health. "The doctors knew no licensed physician in his right mind would ever do this," Bamford said.

The victim is still recovering from the surgery and says it's too painful to work. She also has racked up numerous medical bills. Authorities believe there are other victims who may be too embarrassed to come forward. "(Morris) was readily introduced to our victim as someone who could help improve her shape, so we believe (she's) done this to other people," Bamford said.

Source: AP via Breitbart.

Fake doctor gets 10 years for bogus, deadly butt injections
March 28, 2017

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) -- A judge has imposed a 10-year prison sentence on a South Florida transgender woman who performed illegal buttocks-enhancements, injecting her clients with toxic materials including tire sealant and superglue and causing one woman's death.

Local media outlets report that 36-year-old Oneal Ron Morris was sentenced Monday in Broward County court. She pleaded no contest last month to manslaughter and practicing medicine without a license.

Morris previously served more than a year in prison for injecting toxic materials into the rear-ends of clients throughout South Florida.

Authorities say Shatarka Nuby paid Morris $2,000 for as many as 10 injections between 2007 and 2010. Nuby died from related complications in 2012.

Morris' attorney said he disagreed with the sentence because her patients knew they were not dealing with a real doctor.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2017 11:56 pm 
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Dallas woman guilty of buttocks injection that killed client
March 28, 2017

DALLAS (AP) -- A Dallas salon worker was found guilty Tuesday of murder in the death of woman injected in the buttocks with industrial-grade silicone during an illegal cosmetic procedure.

Denise "Wee Wee" Ross was found guilty after the Dallas County jury deliberated over the course of two days. The 45-year-old cosmetician also was found guilty of practicing medicine without a license.

Prosecutors said Ross injected the silicone into Wykesha Reid's buttocks to give her what the salon called the "Wee Wee Booty." The compound circulated through the 34-year-old woman's lungs, probably causing the 34-year-old client difficulty breathing, said Dr. Stephen Lenfest, who performed the autopsy on Reid.

She was found dead at the salon early one morning in 2015, having been dead for four to eight hours, Lenfest testified.

Defense attorney Heath Harris said he and Ross never denied giving the illegal injections at the time of Reid's death, but Harris said prosecutors had not proved that Ross had given Reid her injections.

The trial moved to the punishment phase Tuesday afternoon. Ross faces up to life in prison.

According to trial testimony, Reid had given illegal injections for more than three years in Dallas, telling customers they were getting saline or "hydrogel" injections.

Jimmy Joe "Alicia" Clark also gave the silicone injections to Reid, who died of a pulmonary embolism. However, Clark's murder charge was changed to manslaughter in return for her testimony against Clark. She goes on trial in June.

The conviction of Ross came on the same day that a Florida judge imposed a 10-year prison sentence on a South Florida woman who performed illegal buttocks-enhancements, injecting her clients with toxic materials including tire sealant and superglue and causing one woman's death.

Local media outlets report that 36-year-old Oneal Ron Morris was sentenced Monday in Broward County court. She pleaded no contest last month to manslaughter and practicing medicine without a license. A woman died from complications related to the injections.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of soft tissue fillers, injectable implants, dermal fillers and wrinkle fillers to fill out faces, but the use on buttocks is not approved.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:00 am 
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Colombians in search of beauty risk death from ‘cowboy’ surgery
By Max Ramsay in Medellin
1 October 2017

“Mothers, wives, daughters, citizens. Your life is more important than beauty.” That was the message last month from Dilian Francisca Toro, governor of southern Colombia’s Valle del Cauca region, which includes the city of Cali. She made her plea in a televised statement following the death of a young woman after apparently routine plastic surgery.

On 11 September, Gladys Gallego Obando, a 35-year-old beautician, was the ninth woman to die following surgery in the city this year, according to local newspaper El País Cali.

As more and more Colombian women seek to change their bodies through artificial means, cowboy operators are flourishing, corners are being cut and women are dying. This is a boom with a very dark side indeed.

The Mediplastic clinic, where Gallego Obando had her operation, has since been shut by the health authorities. An inspection the day after the ill-fated operation revealed it did not have adequate health and safety procedures in place, said a spokeswoman for the governor.

“We are going to keep on shutting down all medical providers that do not [meet] safety standards, because life is our primary concern,” Toro said. “Furthermore, we will keep insisting that those who wish to undergo plastic surgery procedures need to look for an authorised clinic.”

She is leading a campaign to make people aware of the dangers of unapproved clinics, which offer very cheap, but dangerous, operations. The slogan is, “Don’t pay for beauty with your life”. However, awareness wouldn’t have saved Gallego Obando. She died in a government-authorised clinic.

Julieth Gòngora moved from the small town of Mariquita to Medellín city to study, and stayed to work in the beauty industry, for a company that makes organic hair products. “The pressure to have the perfect figure makes you doubt yourself,” she said, adding that media images of perfect bodies pressurise people to follow suit. The stars of popular Colombian reality TV shows, such as current hit Protagonistas, all have physiques sculpted to perfection.

While the use of plastic surgery is obvious, few speak about it openly. Jessica Cediel, a Colombian model and the presenter of a singing-based talent series called Yo Me Llamo, who herself has 3.6 million followers on Instagram, is one of the few who has talked about her history, and struggle, with plastic surgery.

Yet it’s not just TV images that prompt people to have surgery, says Gòngora, but also the financial power of the industry. “Whenever you go to a football match … there will be advertisements for plastic surgery,” she said.

Seeking to change their appearance at an affordable price, Colombians turn to illegal “garage-clinics”, which are by far the most dangerous option. In the days before Gallego Obando died in the intensive care department of the King David clinic in Cali, two women died over one weekend in Medellín.

Yaneth Tordecilla Vásquez, 31, was a lawyer in the town of Turbo. She was injected in mid-August with a substance to increase the size of her buttocks in a local beauty clinic. Something went wrong, her condition worsened, and she died in Medellín on 9 September, Turbo’s health secretary, Hernán Rovira Moreno, told El Colombiano. Investigations into her death are ongoing and the authorities have appealed for information about the clinic she visited.

Alba Yanet Zapata Sepúlveda, 50, arrived at a hospital in Antioquia, north of Medellin, in the middle of the night, complaining of intense stomach pains. She spent 23 days in intensive care before she died. The health secretary has not confirmed whether she had had liposuction or an abdominoplasty – a “tummy tuck”. A lawyer for the clinic where she had her procedure said it complies with approved standards and that a qualified plastic surgeon performed her operation.

Since the start of 2016, 20 women have died in Medellín following cosmetic procedures, according to Bernardo Alejandro Guerra Hoyos, a member of the city council. The figures are astoundingly high, though they give no hint of the number of people who are affected by, but survive, risky operations. The International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (Isaps) has estimated that Colombia has the 11th-highest demand for plastic surgery in the world, with around half a million procedures performed in 2016.

There is currently no government organisation that gathers data on numbers of cosmetic operations in Colombia, let alone numbers of those that fail.

Guerra Hoyos campaigns on the problem of illegal plastic surgery. He has called for data to be collected to expose the trend, and has denounced the health department for failing to stop the bootleg industry. He has also gathered testimonies and given a platform to women who have survived illegal cosmetic operations to talk about their experiences.

Their stories reveal a public health scandal. Yuly Alexandra Pineda is one victim of a botched operation, after which the surgeon offered to give her his car and the machines in his clinic as payment for damages. However, these illegal clinics take advantage of people of all classes, Guerra Hoyos told the Observer. “[And], unfortunately, a large majority are women with fewer resources.”

Journalist Lorena Beltrán started the Safe Surgery Now campaign (CirugíaSeguraYA) last year, calling on Colombia’s congress to improve plastic surgery regulation in the country. A failed operation in 2014 motivated her to fight those cosmetic practitioners who are exploiting people. She sees two distinct problems in the industry in Colombia: there is an obvious threat from “garage-clinics”, but authorised providers can also be risky.

“Doctors take short courses abroad, which they later present as formal medical [qualifications],” Beltrán told the Observer. One doctor who took an “express” plastic surgery course in Brazil told an Al Jazeera documentary last year that he was taught in Portuguese, a language he couldn’t speak.

Another doctor, who had taken an express course in Brazil, caused Beltrán severe damage. She has lost sensation in her breasts and the operation affected her glands, so she may never be able to produce breast milk. She bared her scars on the front page of El Espectador in 2016 to highlight the dangers of the industry. She has now had reconstructive surgery with a specialist surgeon, and her scars are gone.

It is not only women these unqualified doctors are hurting, but men and trans people, too. “In most cases, because of their socioeconomic status, members of the trans community go to very cheap, clandestine medical centres where people who aren’t even doctors inject them with substances. Many end up dying because of this,” Beltrán said.

Attempts to bring in safer plastic surgery legislation stumbled in 2016, but could now be about to become law. A new bill demanding, among other regulations, stricter training requirements for surgeons, has passed one of the four stages needed to become official. It is due for further debate in the Chamber of Representatives.

Until women like Gladys Gallego Obando stop dying, activists will keep fighting for safe surgery. “Here, the problem is the lack of state control, legislation by congress and precautions for patients,” Beltrán reflects. “It is not about vanity.”

Source: The Observer UK

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