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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2015 3:59 am 
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Man's red underwear leads to burglary arrest
June 2, 2015

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Taykim Ross was arrested and charged with second-degree burglary

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) — The blue sneakers were the subject of the crime, but police say it was a man's red underwear that led to his arrest on Long Island.

Police say 18-year-old Taykim Ross stole $200, electronics and Air Jordan sneakers from an apartment Monday and stopped in the backyard to try on the new kicks. That's when a neighbor snapped a photo of the suspect with red boxers visible above his jeans.

Hempstead Village Officer Russell Harris says he was returning after a canvass of the neighborhood when he noticed someone taking garbage out. He saw someone bending over with "bright red underwear." Turns out, it was an exact match.

"I just happened to sit in the car for a moment and in my rear view mirror about 500 hundred yards away I see a guy bending over putting garbage bags down and what do I see, low and behold, I see red underwear standing out," Harris said. The officer acknowledged that young men in Hempstead are often seen not wearing belts with pants hanging low. "If he would have gone home and put a belt on, I probably wouldn't have noticed him."

Harris was arraigned on a burglary charge Tuesday in district court and was conditionally released to probation. He was represented by a lawyer from Legal Aid, which does not comment on pending cases.

Source: Yahoo! AP.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 4:51 am 
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The End of Boys and Girls: These Companies Are Going to Change How Your Kids Dress
by Kim Bhasin
July 14, 2015

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Ever since Jaya Iyer's daughter was a toddler, she had been fascinated by Saturn and its icy rings.

When Swaha turned three, she had a space-themed birthday party. But when her mom went to find clothes with space images for Swaha, she couldn't find any. They were all in the boys section.

So the 41-year-old mother of two, who has a doctorate in fashion merchandising, started her own business called Svaha (which is how her daughter's name is pronounced) to sell clothes that upend gender stereotypes. One shirt features a grinning green stegosaurus, the plates on its back adorned with polka dots. A second comes in a blazing pink hue, with an astronaut planting an American flag on the moon. That one should satisfy her daughter. "She was very upset with me for not ever buying her anything with astronauts on it," Iyer says. "Then she started telling me: 'I want a ninja on my shirt.'"

Svaha is one of several startups that have emerged in recent years with the goal of changing the standards that govern what kids wear. These upstarts aren't looking to replace current kid's apparel entirely. Instead, their founders say they want to provide children with more options. Handsome in Pink says it's all right for boys to wear pink and purple. BuddingSTEM offers science-themed garb for girls. Perhaps the buzziest label is Princess Awesome, which raised more than $200,000 in a successful Kickstarter campaign, showing demand for pirate-themed dresses and girl's apparel covered in the symbol for pi. Most of the ventures remain in early stages as online-only entities using crowdfunded or bootstrapped cash to sell small numbers of shirts or dresses.

Several of the startups share a common origin: They were borne out of parental frustration with major retailers. Simply shopping in the opposite gender's section isn't the answer, these parents say. Cultural norms mean that as kids get older, designating certain items as male or female can confuse and frustrate them. A girl may not want to wear something designated for boys, and vice-versa.

"Most kids and parents are going to the big retailers and seeing all these messages of what its means to be a boy or a girl," says Sharon Choksi, co-founder of clothing line Girls Will Be. Choksi's daughter Maya, now 10, never liked sparkles or "feminine" colors, so the Choksis would shop for Maya in the boys' section. As Maya got older, Choksi worried that "boy" and "girl" labels would unnecessarily upset her daughter.

Choksi, from Austin, started selling girl's shirts in 2013 before expanding into hoodies and shorts. In an effort to encourage girls to move around freely, the fit of Girls Will Be tops fall somewhere between a traditional, fitted girl's shirt and the boxy, looser fit typically marketed to boys. One design reads, “bold, daring, fearless, adventurous, so many things,” while another features a silhouette of a girl doing a flying sidekick. Choksi wants her clothes to fill a gap left open by big companies. "When are the big retailers going to wake up and realize that not all girls are the same and not all boys are the same?" she asks.

In Seattle, Martine Zoer had similar experiences with her sons. She grew tired of her boys, now four and seven, being pushed merchandise featuring designs of dinosaurs and trucks. In 2014, she founded Quirkie Kids, a label devoted to gender-neutral clothes. "There's nothing wrong with pink or girls liking pink," Zoer says. "But if we only offer them that choice, there's something wrong with that."

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Svaha clothing line. Source: Svaha Inc. via Bloomberg

“There’s nothing hardwired in our brains that says pink is for girls and blue is for boys,” says Lise Eliot, a neuroscientist at the Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Frank University and author of Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow Into Troublesome Gaps—and What We Can Do About It. It’s purely a cultural phenomenon. By the time children are toddlers, Eliot says, boys start rejecting pink because they realize it may diverge from what's expected.

These apparel choices can have enduring repercussions by affecting kids' interests and long-term goals. For instance, since most female clothes are more fitted, they often double as restraints, Eliot says, pushing girls away from physical activities. Kids' play habits matter, because they affect development and ultimately, even what career they end up embracing. If a girl is tugged away from liking outer space by societal pressures, she probably won't veer toward an aerospace profession later in life. If a boy is discouraged from playing with dolls and wearing bold clothes, they may not want to get into fashion design one day. "They see it's the boys with the rocket ships and the girls with the pretty flowers," adds Eliot.

At major retail outlets such as Children's Place and Gymboree, there are few, if any, options for the girl who loves dinosaurs or football. Same goes for the boy who loves unicorns and hearts. Much of the merchandise is as stereotyped as can be: a T-Rex playing football in the boys section; a shirt that reads "I ❤ My B.F.F. More Than Shoes" in the girls section. A representative for Children's Place declined to comment on how it decides what designs and colors to sell boys and girls, and representatives for Gymboree did not respond to a request for comment.

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Quirkie Kids Source: Quirkie Kids via Bloomberg

Big retailers are typically focused on quantity, so until enough shoppers demand clothes that don't fall along traditional lines, not much will change, says Patty Leto, senior vice president of childrens' wear at the Doneger Group, a trend intelligence firm. "Pink is always going to sell for girls and blue is always going to sell for boys, no matter what is going on out there with small labels," she says. In the end, it's up to the parents. "The consumer is the ultimate voter here," she says.

Take Lands' End, which in 2014 found itself under attack by angry shoppers when New Jersey mom Lisa Ryder wrote a letter decrying stereotypes in its clothing selection. Flipping through a catalog, Ryder's daughter loved shirts with planets and dinosaurs, though they were clearly marked for boys. When it was suggested to Ryder by a Facebook commenter that she simply purchase a boy's shirt, she responded with vigor. "The problem is that your recent catalog copy and product offerings strongly promote the gender stereotypes that young boys are smart and mighty and young girls are adorable," she wrote. "Simply buying my daughter one of your 'boy shirts' is not the answer because it perpetuates the idea that science is a boy thing that she happens to be participating in." Lands' End decided to release new science-themed shirts for girls.

For the giants of the clothing world, it's an exercise in figuring out what will sell. For the budding brands, it's less a race for revenue than a mission to make a difference. "Everybody's really supportive of each other, rather than being competitive," Zoer, the Quirkie Kids founder, says of the community of new brands. "We're all sort of in this together."

Source: Bloomberg.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 5:02 am 
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Men's fashion designers celebrate androgyny trend
By John-John Williams IV
22 June 2015

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A model wears a creation for Gucci men's Spring-Summer 2016 collection, part of the Milan Fashion Week, unveiled in Milan, Italy, Monday, June 22, 2015.
Antonio Calanni / Associated Press

Guys, get ready for lace collars, sheer shirts and an occasional dress or skirt.

Men's fashion designers are taking a more androgynous approach to their offerings this year. Feminine elements are making their way into the latest collections, following several years in which even fairly mainstream celebrities have embraced styles that eschew traditional gender norms. "The classic male archetype has changed and evolved," said David Hart, a menswear designer who is a Severna Park native. "You are seeing different ways of dressing for men. You see this movement of men wearing neoprene and wearing a skirt over leggings."

The movement has been building for a while. It was heavily featured during the fall fashion shows, where there was a definite gender-blurring feel among the menswear collections.

David Tlale dressed his male models — including supermodel Tyson Beckford — in skirts and layered flowing fabrics that softened traditionally masculine pieces such as blazers and pants. At the Custo Barcelona show, male models dressed in Bohemian-styled ponchos and heavily layered outerwear similar to their female counterparts. And Hood by Air sent out male models in slit dresses. It carried over during this summer's shows in Europe.

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Designer Alessandro Michele led the charge in June when he sent male models down the runway in sheer lace tops, blouses with bows and flared Jacquard pants for Gucci's show in Milan. Rick Owens included a slew of dresses and oversized layered frocks for his men's collection in Paris. Last week, during New York's inaugural men's fashion week, the trend was solidified when more than more than 50 menswear shows unveiled the latest fashions, including a noticeable amount of feminine details.

Celebrities have been successfully rocking gender-bending looks for years. And it's not just the man-bun moment popularized by Jared Leto, Orlando Bloom and director Cary Fukunaga. Celebs have continued to incorporate style tips from their female counterparts' fashion playbook.

Amaryllis has added several new clothing lines to go along with their arsenal of bling. Owners Allie Wolf and Anna Marie Fiume describe Planet, which is designed by Lauren Grossman, Feel the Piece and Groceries as season-less, age-less and size-less collections of creative women’s apparel offering natural fabrics such as linen and Pima cotton.

Jaden Smith, the 17-year-old son of Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith, ditched the traditional tuxedo when he attended a prom in May. Instead, he opted for a midi-length white skirt, long black tunic and a cavernous black blazer. He completed the ensemble with black pants, sneakers and fingerless white gloves. Three years ago, Kanye West wore a leather Givenchy skirt from the men's spring-summer 2012 collection during a concert at Madison Square Garden. Ewan McGregor, Vin Diesel, Gerard Butler and Diddy have all worn skirts in recent years. And who could forget when rapper Lil' Wayne wore women's jeggings during the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards?

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"It's an exciting time," said Hart, who showcased last week in New York. "There really is going to be a big interest and a big influx in the United States. You'll start seeing what we're seeing in Paris, Milan and London."

Will Baltimore men follow the trend?

Christopher Schafer, owner of Christopher Schafer Clothier in Harbor East, thinks so. "I think it depends on where you're going," said Schafer, who likes the trend. "If it's for nightlife and you are going out to the clubs? Yes. Is this going to be daytime street wear? I doubt it. This will be more for that club-like atmosphere." Schafer said that the trend will likely only work in certain situations. "You have to have the right body type to pull it off. If you are very tall and slender, then the androgynous look will work better," he said. "When you think of the king of androgyny, David Bowie, he was thin. He kind of set the standard."

Toni James plans to stock her menswear Baltimore boutique, Angel Park, with garments that have feminine inspiration such as oversized leather scarves, white suede pants, colorful leather pants, knits and pieces in pastel colors. "Baltimore men have stepped their game up," she said. "They are on fire. The young guys, the older guys, they are saying, 'Give me something different for the weekend.'" The owner of the Fells Point boutique added: "I'm glad that Baltimore men are taking a chance on a different way of fashion. The women want to see their men in something different. They don't want to be the only one that everyone is looking at all the time."

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Stevie Boi, the Baltimore-based eyewear and fashion designer whose fans include Lady Gaga and Rihanna, has been mixing feminine garments with his male fashion staples since 2009. Prior to that point, he said, he didn't have a personal style that distinguished him from others. He made a conscious effort to stand out when he sat down with photographer Michael-Antonio to develop a new image — and it turned out to be a more gender-ambiguous image. "I was very lost with my fashion," he explained. "I realized that I could wear female and male and intertwine. Before that I felt that no one was paying attention what I was wearing. Now they are."

Boi's fashion collections, which feature unisex over-sized dresses and cloaks, reflect that gender fluidity. "It is now being more embraced," he said. "People are a little more open-minded. They are designing for all people. It's changing and evolving. I do see a big push for it." He added: "Ten years from now we won't be having this conversation. We'll just be talking about clothing."

Source: Baltimore Sun.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 6:44 pm 
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Milan Fashion Week 2015

Blurred gender

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Models wear creations for DSquared2 men's Spring-Summer 2016 collection, part of the Milan Fashion Week, unveiled in Milan, Italy, Tuesday, June 23, 2015. (AP Photo/Giuseppe Aresu)

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Breaking Bad actor RJ Mitte walked for Vivienne Westwood in this bold statement piece at Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016.

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A model dons a fitted cardigan with flower detailing, navy skirt and fringe bag for Gucci at Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016.

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Another Gucci look features a belted coat and flower necktie at Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016.

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A model for MSGM shows off a sheer, net-like top at Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016.

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Another graphic print - this time a butterfly and anchor combo for fashion house Gucci - popped up on a leggy model at the runway at the Men Spring-Summer 2016 Milan's Fashion Week.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2015 6:55 pm 
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Milan fashion week: boys just want to have fun
June 23, 2015

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Gucci

The Milanese menswear collections for Spring / Summer 2016 were all about challenging gender stereotypes when it comes to fashion, with traditionally feminine colors, patterns and fabrics splashed all over the runways.

Gucci led the way with a flouncy collection of pussy-bow blouses, crochet shorts and frilly cuffs courtesy of new creative director Alessandro Michele. Pretty and elegant motifs in the shape of butterflies and birds, floral jacquard prints and lace shirts with ruffled panels and flower corsage "ties" were just some of the examples of the house's feminine take on menswear. The look was styled out with tinted glasses, laced-up ballet pumps and fistfuls of glittery rings for an overall magpie aesthetic.

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Dolce & Gabbana

There were elements of the trend at Dolce and Gabbana, where the oriental-inspired pieces included subtly feminine silk floral bombers and thin bird-print sweaters. Pyjama-like tailoring added a softness to the collection.

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Etro

Italian fashion house Etro featured paisley and floral motifs as one of the main components of its collection. The brand played with gender stereotypes by dressing models head to toe in traditionally 'girlish' colors such as dusky pinks and lilac suedes for a look that was both pretty and plush, yet saved from becoming too saccharine by sharp tailoring.

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Canali

The theme continued at Canali, where elegant, gemlike hues were the star attraction of the show. Colors ranging from graceful lilacs and dusky violets to burnt oranges and duck egg blues could be seen on the catwalk, with models often dressed head to toe in the same color -- a move that made the look less fashion victim and more of a bold and decisive statement. Again the tailoring was decidedly masculine, with boxy jackets and sharp suits providing a mannish silhouette to counteract the chocolate box hues on offer.

Source: Yahoo! RelaxNews.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2015 3:38 am 
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This mother couldn't find dinosaur t-shirts for girls - so she started her own company
by Bethan McKernan
21 July 2015

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When author Cheryl Rickman took her seven-year-old daughter Brooke clothes shopping, she knew Brooke was only after one thing: dinosaurs.

But after looking for ages, they realised that the only t-shirts in the girls' aisle were all princesses and pink. Frustrated with the fact that the things Brooke loved like dinosaurs, football and pirates were never aimed at girls, the mother and daughter had an idea: why not start their own t-shirt company?

Climbing Trees Kids launched last month, tackles gender stereotyping with designs like flower-bearing dinosaurs splashing in puddles and female robots, pirates and monsters.

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Cheryl says the range “isn’t so much gender-neutral as gender-empowering.” We don't want to get rid of flowers or pink. We just want to flip the gender stereotypes on their head to provide girls (and boys) with a choice not previously offered to them.

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We wanted to reclaim motifs that have been reserved for boys and give girls the chance to wear them too, without always having to buy them from the boys’ department... Nobody should tell children what they can and can't like. It's how they express themselves.

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Because as the company's name suggests, both she and Brooke like climbing trees, Cheryl said a percentage from each £11 t-shirt sale is being donated to The Woodland Trust.

Check out the Climbing Trees website.

Source: Independent UK.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 4:51 pm 
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Nudity at Paris Fashion Week
By THOMAS ADAMSON
October 3, 2015

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Models walk the runway during the Nina Ricci show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2016 on October 3, 2015 in Paris, France. Credits: Francois G. Durand

PARIS (AP) -- A foxy belted, shiny coat showing décolleté and worn with nothing else underneath was the opening statement at Nina Ricci - a sign that in only his second show for the historic brand, talented designer Guillaume Henry is steering the boat away from gamine nostalgia.

Exposed nipples and shoulders, glimmering waxed leather and yards of sheer organza spelt full-throttle sensuality in the Saturday night show that was well-received by the audience, which included model and actress Laetitia Casta. Black aprons and rhinestone-encrusted straps filed by alongside fluttering embroidered feathers, evoking a contradiction of the aggressive versus the soft and feminine.

Source: AP

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2015 3:52 am 
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Hood by Air

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Source: Pure-T.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2015 6:44 pm 
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Scrote-n-tote gives consumers X-rated fashion accessory
By Marilyn Malara
November 3, 2015

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The creator of the Scrote'n'Tote has gone public with his intentions to mass produce the graphic backpack. Photo by Daniel Bitton/IndieGogo

MONTREAL (UPI) -- The creator of Scrote-n-Tote, a company keen to produce lifelike scrotum backpacks, has launched a crowdfunding campaign to help fund mass production.

After a photo of Canadian businessman Daniel Bitton wearing his own scrotal backpack, designed by friend and prosthetic makeup artist C.J. Goldman, went viral last year, Bitton took it upon himself to gather a team and begin mass producing the product.

"I and several friends have had to interrupt our lives in order to fully dedicate our lives to the production of lifelike, hideous, giant scrotum backpacks," Britton wrote in the IndieGoGo campaign introduction.

Bitton's team aims to raise $33,000 for what he says will cover the production of the backpacks including "the mold for the skin textured part of the bag, which is the biggest pre-production expense." The funds will also cover product testing and facility costs.

The original scrotum backpack from Bitton's photo costs almost $1000 and "is too heavy and delicate to be used as a proper backpack," he said. A new, more consumer-friendly method of production will be developed in order to bring the backpacks to the masses for $120 a unit.

"Our mission statement [is] to 'Make that money," Bitton joked. "And to pay for law school."

phpBB [video]


Source: UPI.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 8:18 pm 
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And... for the person who has everything...

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:happy0065:

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2016 12:55 pm 
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ugh :spankmehard:

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 4:47 pm 
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Are these Christopher Kane Crocs the world's ugliest shoes?
1 August 2017

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(dpa) – For some, they are a comfortable companion for the feet. For others, they are the ultimate sartorial sin. Whether you love them or hate them, Crocs are a fact of life all over the world.

Even their biggest fans would admit that the humble Croc is not usually associated with high fashion. But British designer Christopher Kane is hoping to change that, and has been pushing hard to bring the rubber clogs into the limelight.

Kane first began his conquest at London Fashion Week last year, when he launched his own signature range of imitation rubber clogs in the style of Crocs. Now, in collaboration with the actual Crocs brand, he is launching a fresh offensive on the footwear market.

And some might say that "offensive" is the right word for the zebra-print rubber shoes, adorned with both a feather pom-pom and a metallic flower embellishment. They are available to purchase throughout Europe from 10 August for around 70 euros. Fashion moves fast: last season, Kane's own range of rubber clogs were marbled, fur-lined and decked out with dazzling rocks.

According to Vogue, Kane said it was the very "ugliness" of the Croc shape that drew him to the shoe in the first place. "I like that they are perceived by some to be quite 'ugly' and not at all feminine or designed to flatter," he said. You can say what you like about these shoes, but at least they're not boring.

Source: dpa

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