TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Sat Aug 18, 2018 2:03 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 2254 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 151  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 8:12 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
The Worst Building in the History of Mankind

It's the Ryugyong Hotel in North Korea, where the world's 22nd largest skyscraper has been vacant for two decades and is likely to stay that way ... forever.

By Eva Hagberg
January 28, 2008

Image
The Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea

A picture doesn't lie -- the one-hundred-and-five-story Ryugyong Hotel is hideous, dominating the Pyongyang skyline like some twisted North Korean version of Cinderella's castle. Not that you would be able to tell from the official government photos of the North Korean capital -- the hotel is such an eyesore, the Communist regime routinely covers it up, airbrushing it to make it look like it's open -- or Photoshopping or cropping it out of pictures completely.

Even by Communist standards, the 3,000-room hotel is hideously ugly, a series of three gray 328-foot long concrete wings shaped into a steep pyramid. With 75 degree sides that rise to an apex of 1,083 feet, the Hotel of Doom (also known as the Phantom Hotel and the Phantom Pyramid) isn't the just the worst designed building in the world -- it's the worst-built building, too. In 1987, Baikdoosan Architects and Engineers put its first shovel into the ground and more than twenty years later, after North Korea poured more than two percent of its gross domestic product to building this monster, the hotel remains unoccupied, unopened, and unfinished.

A bootleg video of the tower from YouTube. How the brazen videographer escaped without being arrested remains a mystery.

Construction on the Hotel of Doom stopped in 1992 (rumors maintain that North Korea ran out of money, or that the building was engineered improperly and can never be occupied) and has never started back up, which shouldn't come as a shock. After all, who the hell travels to beautiful downtown Pyongyang? It would make sense if the hotel were in South Korea, where Americans are allowed to travel and where projects like the Busan Lotte Tower and the Lotte Super Tower now rise thousands of feet above the formerly modest skyline.

With Pyongyang's official population said to range between 2.5 million and 3.8 million (official numbers are not made available by the North Korean government), the Ryugyong Hotel -- the 22nd largest skyscraper in the world -- is a failure on an enormous scale. To put it in context, imagine if the John Hancock Center (1,127 feet tall) in Chicago (population 2.9 million) was not only completely vacant, but unfinished with zero hope of ever being completed.

You may not be able to actually live there, but the building now has its own virtual real estate managers, Richard Dank and Andreas Gruber, a pair of German architects and self-described "custodians of the pyramid's diverse manifestations." The duo run Ryugyong.org, which they describe as an "experimental collaborative online architecture site." Sad you can't visit the building in real life? Log on, view the detailed 3-D models, and "claim" a subsection for yourself.

The Demolition S How video.

The Demolition S How video by the Italian architects Extraneo might not be as conceptual as Ryugyong.org, but this piece of architectural porn sure is fun to watch. The video (which you can watch above) was mounted as part of the exhibition Fiction Pyongyang, curated in part by Stefano Boeri, who also collected 120 speculative designs for the hotel in the June 2006 domus magazine. The designs, he says, "have forced it to reveal its icy nature, its irresistible fascination as a fragile alien meteorite." The worst building in the world is also, we now know, "the only built piece of science fiction in the contemporary world." And it's true. Demolition S How is all Blade Runner-style flying ads and soaring concrete, and the video reminds us that the worst building in the world is the closest humans have come to building a Death Star.

Source: Esquire.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 5:30 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Sheriff: Woman Sat on Toilet for 2 Years
March 12, 2008
By ROXANA HEGEMAN
Associated Press Writer

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) -- Authorities are considering charges in the bizarre case of a woman who sat on her boyfriend's toilet for two years — so long that her body was stuck to the seat by the time the boyfriend finally called police.

Ness County Sheriff Bryan Whipple said it appeared the 35-year-old Ness City woman's skin had grown around the seat. She initially refused emergency medical services but was finally convinced by responders and her boyfriend that she needed to be checked out at a hospital.

"We pried the toilet seat off with a pry bar and the seat went with her to the hospital," Whipple said. "The hospital removed it."

Whipple said investigators planned to present their report Wednesday to the county attorney, who will determine whether any charges should be filed against the woman's 36-year-old boyfriend.

"She was not glued. She was not tied. She was just physically stuck by her body," Whipple said. "It is hard to imagine. ... I still have a hard time imagining it myself."

He told investigators he brought his girlfriend food and water, and asked her every day to come out of the bathroom.

"And her reply would be, `Maybe tomorrow,'" Whipple said. "According to him, she did not want to leave the bathroom."

The boyfriend called police on Feb. 27 to report that "there was something wrong with his girlfriend," Whipple said, adding that he never explained why it took him two years to call.

Police found the clothed woman sitting on the toilet, her sweat pants down to her mid-thigh. She was "somewhat disoriented," and her legs looked like they had atrophied, Whipple said.

"She said that she didn't need any help, that she was OK and did not want to leave," he said.

She was reported in fair condition at a hospital in Wichita, about 150 miles southeast of Ness City. Whipple said she has refused to cooperate with medical providers or law enforcement investigators.

Authorities said they did not know if she was mentally or physically disabled.

Police have declined to release the couple's names, but the house where authorities say the incident happened is listed in public records as the residence of Kory McFarren. No one answered his home phone number.

The case has been the buzz Ness City, said James Ellis, a neighbor.

"I don't think anybody can make any sense out of it," he said.

Ellis said he had known the woman since she was a child but that he had not seen her for at least six years.

He said she had a tough childhood after her mother died at a young age and apparently was usually kept inside the house as she grew up. At one time the woman worked for a long-term care facility, he said, but he did not know what kind of work she did there.

"It really doesn't surprise me," Ellis said of the bathroom incident. "What surprises me is somebody wasn't called in a bit earlier."

Source: Breitbart AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Fri May 02, 2008 9:35 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Man arrested in Texas for trying to cash $360 billion check

Thur May 1, 2008

Image

FORT WORTH, Texas — Charles Ray Fuller must have been planning one big record company. The 21-year-old North Texas man was arrested last week for trying to cash a $360 billion check, saying he wanted to start a record business. Tellers at the Fort Worth bank were immediately suspicious — perhaps the 10 zeros on a personal check tipped them off.

Fuller, of suburban Crowley, was arrested on a forgery charge. He was released after posting $3,750 bail.

Fuller said his girlfriend's mother gave him the check to start a record business. But bank employees who contacted the account's owner said the woman told them she did not give him permission to take or cash the check.

In addition to the forgery count, Fuller was charged with unlawfully carrying a weapon and possessing marijuana. Officers reported finding less than two ounces of marijuana and a .25-caliber handgun and magazine in his pockets.

Source: Yahoo! AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 3:10 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
From The Times
May 6, 2008
Turkmenistan dictator Niyazov's golden statue removed to suburbs

Image
A statue of Saparmurat Niyazov under the guard of soldiers in Ashgabat
By Tony Halpin in Moscow

It turned in the sunshine as a grotesque symbol of one man's megalomaniac rule over the people of Turkmenistan.

Now the sun may be going down on a golden statue of Saparmurat Niyazov in the latest move to dismantle the personality cult surrounding the late dictator, who styled himself "Turkmenbashi", or Father of all Turkmen.

Niyazov's successor as President, Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, has ordered the Government to remove the giant rotating statue from the centre of the capital. Ashgabat. to a southern suburb.

Niyazov spent $12million (£6m) on a 75m (244ft) tower called the Arch of Neutrality, placing the 12m monument to himself at the top in 1998. The gold-plated statue with outstretched arms rotated once every 24 hours so that Niyazov always faced the sun.

The statue was the most prominent of a series of vanity projects, including an ice palace and a 40m pyramid, that Niyazov built with income from Turkmenistan's huge gas reserves, while his five million people lived in poverty. He ruled the Central Asian republic, formerly part of the Soviet Union, with an iron fist for 21 years until he died of heart failure, aged 66, in December 2006.

Mr Berdymukhamedov, 51, told a meeting of ministers that the tower should be moved next to a road named Neutrality Avenue, after Niyazov's policy of maintaining Turkmenistan's neutrality in foreign relations. It was unclear whether the statue would remain at the top of the building once it has been moved.

The order came only a week after Mr Berdymukhamedov reversed another of Niyazov's decrees and restored the usual names of the months of the year.

Turkmenbashi had renamed January after himself, turned April into Gurbansoltan in honour of his mother and called other months after national heroes. He decreed that September should be named Rukhnama (Book of the Spirit) after a collection of his thoughts.

Turkmenistan was known as the North Korea of Central Asia under Niyazov.

Mr Berdymukhamedov, a former health minister and dentist, has gradually ended his country's international isolation since winning 89 per cent of the vote in its first election last year since independence in 1991.

Ban on beards

— Niyazov banned lip-synching, car radios, beards, and the playing of recorded music at weddings

— Citizens with gold teeth were told to have them extracted

— He shut rural libraries, saying that people in villages did not read

— The opera house was closed in 2001. Niyazov declared: "Who needs Tosca or La Traviata any more?"

— All hospitals outside the capital Ashgabat were closed and about 15,000 doctors were dismissed in 2005

— Compulsory education was cut by a year so that students could not qualify to study abroad

Source: Times Online UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 3:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Image
Toktokan Tileberdaeva, a mother of six, who has lived almost 40 years in Razansai, a small village in Kyrgyzstan. (Carolyn Drake for The New York Times)
LETTER FROM KYRGYZSTAN
Living off the land in a post-Soviet world
By Sabrina Tavernise
May 15, 2008

RAZANSAI, Kyrgyzstan: In this remote corner of the former Soviet Union, life has shrunk to the size of the basics: tomatoes, corn, apricot trees, baby goats.

That is what grows in the garden of Toktokan Tileberdaeva, a mother of six who has lived almost 40 years in this small village in Kyrgyzstan, a claw-shaped country covered in mountains that once formed part of the Soviet Union's long border with China.

Like a settler on the frontier, she lives off the land, hauling water from a turquoise-colored river and washing her clothes in the same bucket she uses to wash her grandchildren. Her pension, $33 a month, is enough to buy one giant sack of flour - bread for the month.

Life was not always like this. Before Communism fell and Kyrgyzstan became its own country, Tileberdaeva had a job in a toothbrush factory. Her husband, now deceased, worked building giant hydroelectric plants, and a bus came to take their children to school.

But after 1991 the factory closed, all public services stopped and an economic collapse tore painful holes in the lives of families here, turning them into immigrants in their own country. Their skills were no longer needed. Their past was a mistake.

"I really miss the Soviet Union," she said, standing in a small blue trailer where she and her children sleep on soft rugs. "We lived well. I worked. I earned a salary."

The Soviet Union collapsed almost 17 years ago, but for many on the outer edges of the empire it feels like yesterday. They enjoy reminiscing about the times when they were young and their factories were working full steam. Now the toothbrush factory stands empty with blank windows, a painful reminder of their lost past.

Change is coming. Engineers from China, Turkey and Iran, though not from Russia, have rebuilt the long ribbon of road that cuts through the mountains to connect the south of the country to the north.

Tileberdaeva's younger children are taught in Kyrgyz, not Russian.

Goods and trade have begun to flow from China in the east, instead of from Russia in the west.

But none of that is any consolation to Tileberdaeva, who spends every waking hour scratching a living out of her land. Sometimes her oldest daughter, a cafeteria worker in Bishkek, the capital, sends her money. The rest comes from her goats and her garden.

Her life is solitary. She is content with the company of her children and grandchildren, and says she does not seek other adults for support or friendship. Most people in this small town are drunks, she said. Chinese merchants, sullenly despised for their wealth and success, provide fleeting entertainment: locals throw rocks at them when they drive by.

The past is not always something she wants to remember. Her husband stole her when she was 19, as she walked home from class at a technical college, a local custom that she feels is heartlessly unfair. She cried, kicking and screaming, as they reached his home.

She tried - and failed - three times to escape.

"I wanted to die," she said looking at the remains of the first house she was brought to, also on the property, but now a grassy playground with walls but no roof.

Family life improved, but only a little. Her husband was a drinker, and was mean when drunk, sometimes throwing her and the children out of the house in a rage. He died in 2003 (the Soviet military sent him to clean up Chernobyl, and he was never quite the same when he returned), but she grimaced when asked if she had married again.

"If I had had a second one, he would have been the same," she said.

Her current concern is a roof, not a man. On a snowy night in December, a pan on her small wood stove caught fire during dinner, setting the roof on fire. She fled through a window with the children, wading out into the snow in pajamas and running for help. The winter was unusually snowy, but there was no money for a roof, so she and her family crammed into a donated trailer, a single dark room coated in quilts.

Things could be worse. Kyrgyzstan is relatively liberal compared to its authoritarian neighbors, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. A clean river flows through her backyard, and the soil is rich. Her goats recently had a litter. Their soft babies wobbled in spring grass.

She asked about America, as water for laundry heated on a hotplate. Did everyone live in a high-rise building? Was everyone rich? She watched as her small grandson, wearing a cast-off New York Yankees hat, teetered in, holding a tiny yellow flower.

"Our garden is free," she said smiling. "The earth is good. That's how I live."

Then she invited visitors to tear pieces from a round, coarse loaf of bread.

Source: International Herald Tribune.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 5:20 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Eurovision Song Contest: UK could lose free pass to final

* Leigh Holmwood
* guardian.co.uk,
* Wednesday May 28 2008

Image
Eurovision 2008 winner Dima Bilan. Russia's winning entry from Dima Bilan was produced by Timbaland.
Photograph: AFP

The UK could lose its guaranteed place in the Eurovision Song Contest final following criticism that the event is becoming increasingly biased against western European countries.

Eurovision organisers have told MediaGuardian.co.uk that the issue of the UK's guaranteed place in the final will be one of a number to be discussed at a meeting of the European Broadcasting Union in Athens in two weeks' time.

A senior BBC insider said that it has an "open mind" about the controversial proposal, which, if implemented, could see the UK's Eurovision entry have to qualify and potentially fail to make the final for the first time in the event's history.

Russia's Dima Bilan won Saturday's contest in Belgrade, with the Ukraine coming second.

The UK, Germany, France and Spain - the "big four" Eurovision countries who get an automatic place in the final because they contribute the most funding - all came in the bottom 10.

The UK's entry, The X Factor finalist Andy Abraham's Even If, came joint last.

A growing feeling that the UK may never win Eurovision again has even led BBC commentator Sir Terry Wogan to say he may quit, claiming political bloc voting had got out of control.

BBC1's ratings for this year's event were also down, with 7.1 million viewers on Saturday, compared with last year's 8.7 million.

The head of the Eurovision Song Contest, Svante Stockselius, told MediaGuardian.co.uk that potential changes would be discussed when the 42 participating countries meet next month.

"Every year, we evaluate and debrief each contest. We will discuss these things there," Stockselius said.

"We did a couple of big changes to this year's event, with the introduction of two semi-finals.

"We do not exclude that we will look into different changes for next year."

When asked if the poor performance of the "big four" countries could be down to other countries purposely voting against them, he replied: "It could be."

Stockselius added: "I don't think it is jealousy, but it might be that people think: 'Why should we vote for them when they are automatically in the final? Lets vote for someone else'. It could be something like that."

Making the "big four" compete in the Eurovision semi-finals could lead to them cutting their funding, but Stockselius said the scale of sponsorship the contest now attracts meant it could afford to carry on without this money.

"Of course we would have to look into funding, but we have such big sponsorship now it could manage," he said. "It would be a point of discussion."

The BBC's controller of entertainment commissioning, Elaine Bedell, told MediaGuardian.co.uk that the corporation was keen to talk to the EBU about potential changes.

"We are going to sit down with the EBU pretty soon to see what the best way forward is," she said.

However, taking part in the semi-final could lead to a position where the UK misses out on a place in the final.

This is a scenario the BBC would be keen to avoid when, due to its contract, it has to screen the three-hour final in peaktime on BBC1.

However, Stockselius said: "That is a question 38 other broadcasters have to face."

BBC sources said the corporation had an "open mind" about the UK potentially losing its automatic place in the final.

"We would have to think clearly about it, although it would be a bit odd giving over primetime without the UK in the final," one insider said.

Stockselius added that taking part in the semi-finals might be a decision the "big four" broadcasters should take for themselves in order to bring greater interest to the contest.

"Maybe it should be something for the broadcasters to consider," he added. "They would most probably get a better rating in the semi-final."

BBC insiders said that as well as potential changes to the contest's structure, questions also had to be asked about what acts the UK put forward in future.

"The viewing figures [for this year's contest] were fantastic, but we need to think about the sorts of musical acts we put forward in the future and how we want to approach it," a BBC insider said.

Stockselius said he did not agree with the argument that the "big four" would never win again, adding it was "fully natural and understandable" for countries to be disappointed when they did badly.

However, he added that it was "more the matter of the song and performance" and praised the Russian entry - which was produced by top US artist Timbaland — as a "worthy winner".

Source: Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 5:27 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
What a bunch of sore losers the Brits are! Gawds.

Russia's song was professionally produced and sung by a well-known and best selling popstar in a dozen countries. It was certainly one of the best songs there and deserved to win. And that was NOT due to bloc voting but because everyone gave them at least some points, even if not the highest of 12.

It's little wonder people will purposefully NOT give the UK points, especially when their entry is nothing more than OK. It's very petty of the BBC to say that they see no reason to occupy prime time for the Eurovision Song Festival if the UK isn't in it. What nonsense ! Most people watch it for the spirit of what it is - a Pan-European Festival and Contest, not only to see their own country's entry.

Shame on you, BBC and those Brits that whine about this !

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:37 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Polar bear shot dead after 200-mile swim

* Allegra Stratton and agencies
* guardian.co.uk,
* Thursday June 5 2008

Image
The polar bear lies dead after being shot by police in Iceland. Photograph: Icelandic television

A polar bear that swam more than 200 miles in near-freezing waters to reach Iceland was shot on arrival in case it posed a threat to humans.

The bear, thought to be the first to reach the country in at least 15 years, was killed after local police claimed it was a danger to humans, triggering an outcry from animal lovers. Police claimed it was not possible to sedate the bear.

The operation to kill the animal was captured on film.

The adult male, weighing 250kg, was presumed to have swum some 200 miles from Greenland, or from a distant chunk of Arctic ice, to Skagafjordur in northern Iceland.

"There was fog up in the hills and we took the decision to kill the bear before it could disappear into the fog," said the police spokesman Petur Bjornsson.

Iceland's environment minister, Thorunn Sveinbjarnardottir, gave the green light for police to shoot the bear because the correct tranquiliser would have taken 24 hours to be flown in, the Icelandic news channel Visir.is reported.

Sveinbjarnardottir's account was disputed by the chief vet in the town of Blönduó, Egill Steingrímsson, who said he had the drugs necessary to immobilise the bear in the boot of his car. "If the narcotics gun would have been sent by plane, it would have arrived within an hour," he said. "They could keep tabs on the bear for that long."

Steingrímsson also criticised police for not closing a mountain road where people congregated after hearing news of the bear. "There were around 50 to 60 people there watching. The police did not have many options when the bear ran down the hill, approaching the crowd," Steingrimsson said. "I'm very unsatisfied that the police did not try to catch it alive and did not close the road."

The oldest record of polar bears being sighted in Iceland is from 890, 16 years after the first settlers arrived. The last visit was in 1993, when sailors saw a bear swimming off the coast of Strandir. It was also killed.

Polar bears were frequently tamed during the middle ages, but since then no bear has been captured alive in Iceland. Receding North Pole ice is diminishing their hunting and mating grounds and jeopardising their survival.

A spokesman for PolarWorld, a German group dedicated to the preservation of the polar regions and the creatures which inhabit it, called the bear's death "an avoidable tragedy ... another great day for mankind".

Source: Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 6:07 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
From Times Online
June 11, 2008
Nepal's King Gyanendra moves out of palace, home to royal family for 100 years

Image
(Devendra Man Singh/AFP/Getty) Two weeks after losing his job, the former Nepalese king, Gyanendra, has been asked to vacate his palace in Kathmandu

Vowing to stay in his former realm, Nepal"s deposed King Gyanendra moved out of the Narayanhiti Palace in Kathmandu this evening, two weeks after the country"s Maoist-led assembly voted to abolish the world"s last Hindu monarchy.

Gyanendra Shah — as he is now officially known — handed the plumed crown and sceptre of the 239-year-old Shah dynasty to government officials along with the palace and other royal assets that have now all been nationalised.

The man still revered by some as the incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu then swept out of the palace in a black limousine, driving behind an armed police pick-up, and past thousands of onlookers and hundreds of riot police.

A few dozen opponents chanted "Gyane, thief, leave the country!" using a derogatory dimunitive of his name, as he headed towards a small summer palace on the capital's outskirts, where officials say he can stay until he finds a private home.

"I have assisted in and respected the verdict of the people," Mr Shah said in a televised address before leaving the Narayanhiti, which was home to the royal family for more than 100 years and will now become a national museum.

"I will stay in the country to help establish peace," he said, sitting in a grand palace hall surrounded by hunting trophies including two stuffed tigers and a rhino head.

It was his first public address since Nepal"s new assembly — elected in April — voted on May 28 to abolish the monarchy and form a republic with a president as head of state.

The assembly, dominated by Maoist rebels who ended their insurgency in 2006, had given him just 15 days to vacate the palace - or face eviction by force.

Mr Shah had been expected to move back into a private residence that he owned before taking the throne, when he earned a fortune in the tobacco, tea, hotels and property businesses.

Surya Thapa, a journalist who has written three books on the Himalayan royals, estimates that Mr Shah has $195 million (£100 million) stashed inside Nepal and even more abroad.

However, Mr Shah asked the Government to let him stay in the Nagarjung summer palace because his playboy son, the former Prince Paras, was already occupying his private residence.

The Government agreed last week, without saying for how long, and is also reported to have allowed Mr Shah a security detail of 75 police officers, although he asked for 400 soldiers.

Mr Shah — whose 600 servants have now become government employees — used his 14-minute address to deny the rumours about his wealth.

"All my properties are in Nepal," he said. "All the properties I have are nationalised."

He also denied playing a role in the palace massacre that led to his coronation in 2001.

Mr Shah took the throne after his brother, the popular King Birendra, and eight other royals were gunned down by a lovesick and intoxicated Crown Prince Dipendra, who then shot himself.

"The accusations that were targeted against us were inhuman," he said.

But he stopped short of apologising to those killed during a popular uprising that forced him to give up absolute power in 2006, less than a year after he sacked the Government.

"If any people have been harmed, I hope you understand it was unintentional," he said.

Since the uprising, his portrait on bank notes has been replaced by a picture of Mount Everest and his name deleted from the national anthem. His $3.1 million annual allowance has been axed and he has even been asked to pay his own electricity bills.

But the biggest surprise of the day came when officials revealed that a 94-year-old former lover of a long-dead King was living in the Narayanhiti and would be allowed to stay there.

Sarala Gorkhali was the youngest mistress of King Tribhuwan, who ruled from 1911 until his death in 1955, and had no house or living relatives, according to the interim Home Minister.

He said that she would be allowed to use two buildings on the palace grounds, along with the former King Gyanendra's stepmother, Ratna, 80.

Source: Times Online UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:18 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
From The Times
June 13, 2008
Welcome aboard the Garbage Express from Italy to Germany

More than 2,000 tonnes of rubbish has piled up in the city of Naples. Residents are violently opposed to any new landfill sites and a promised incinerator will not be ready until next year

Image
More than 2,000 tonnes of rubbish has piled up in the city of Naples. Residents are violently opposed to any new landfill sites and a promised incinerator will not be ready until next year

By Roger Boyes in Berlin and Richard Owen in Rome

Every day of the week a 56-wagon freight train full of rotting tomatoes and stinking nappies makes its way across the Alps to northern Germany in an attempt to save the city of Naples from drowning in its own detritus. It is a strange, 44-hour journey, rattling through the night - the wagons scanned en route for signs of radioactivity or toxic substances — that says much about Europe today and the failure of cities to deal with a central problem of our time: rubbish.

"This can't carry on for ever," says Rüdiger Siechau, head of waste disposal in Hamburg. "A better solution for Naples would be if it set up an environmentally friendly incinerator plant, as we have here."

Hamburg is the final destination for the Garbage Train and though the locals are happy enough at the moment — each tonne of incinerated or recycled rubbish brings in €250 (£200) and 700 tonnes are coming in a day — there is an uncomfortable feeling, too.

Naples is a prime holiday destination for the Germans. Italian products — the Tuscan oil, the glamorous sports cars, the well-cut suits — are coveted here, tokens of a relaxed southern lifestyle. Now, from the bunker in a Hamburg suburb, there is no sign of la dolce vita, only an overpowering stench.

The train containers are unloaded in a goods station, shoved on to trucks, emptied into a vast concrete container and then hoisted by crane, bit by bit, into an incinerator heated to temperatures of 1,000C (1,830F). "No rats so far," says Reinhard Fiedler, of Hamburg Waste Disposal Services, "and no suspicious substances." Hartmut Timm, a biologist involved in the vetting of the Garbage Train, said: "If the rubbish is sub-standard or irregular, the waste disposal plant has the right to send it back to Italy."

The scale of this operation is huge. Germany is taking 200,000 tonnes of rubbish from Naples and, in doing so, is helping Silvio Berlusconi, the newly elected Italian Prime Minister. One of his first pledges on taking office was to clean up Naples and to appoint what one newspaper called a "trash czar".

His plans, say the Germans, were sensible enough: to build the city's first incinerator, to set up more landfill dumps, to get the Army involved. Italy, though, has been hit by a classic example of nimbyism and few communes have been willing to help. The Camorra, the Naples mafia, which has infiltrated the waste management business, is still blocking progress.

According to latest estimates, more than 2,000 tonnes of rubbish has piled up in the centre of Naples and another 23,000 tonnes in the surrounding countryside. Mr Berlusconi vowed yesterday to clean up the city by the end of next month, despite protests against the opening of landfill sites that he said "border on anarchy".

He is prepared to use the Army to clear a path to the rubbish tips. Mr Berlusconi said that a task force of thousands of volunteers — whom he dubbed "angels of rubbish" — was being set up to teach Naples residents how to sort rubbish for recycling. The promised new incinerator will not be ready until the end of the year.

So Germany has become Naples's dumping ground. How much the Garbage Train will end up costing Italy is unclear, but it could be as much as €70million.

For well over a decade, encouraged by a Social Democrat-Green Government between 1998 and 2005, Germany has been refining its recycling and disposal techniques — to the point of madness, some might say. A ritual is the washing of plastic yoghurt containers before dumping them in the appropriate bin.

Letters columns earnestly discuss in which of four colour-coded bins a used condom should go. Householders are given a 60-page booklet to help them to recycle correctly. In some districts dustbin lorries have scales to weigh what they collect: if the waste is over the allowance it remains rotting outside the house for another week or fortnight. Rather than risk rejection, householders pour food leftovers down the lavatory. This has fed and bred a new generation of super-rats in the sewers.

On paper the results are good. Before German reunification Hamburg was ferrying its rubbish across the East-West border to bury its rubbish in landfills supplied by the Communist authorities for hard currency.

Ten years ago Hamburg was still not recycling much — barely 50,000 tonnes out of 1.6million tonnes of rubbish produced by 1.8million people. Now the population is larger, but it discards only 1.4 million tonnes. About 600,000 tonnes of that is incinerated and 800,000 tonnes is recycled. In short, there has been a rubbish revolution in Germany. It has 70 city incinerators and another 90 are planned by 2015. The most modern are state of the art, with filters to reduce greenhouse gases. In Hamburg's case the incinerated waste will produce water vapour to heat households.

This, though, is more than a clash between the unregulated south and the neurotic north. It is about how to solve the problem across Europe of shrinking space, of wasteful consumer behaviour and of the environmental damage wrought by landfills.

The European Union wants its members to slash landfill rubbish to 35 per cent of what it was in 1995. This is a dilemma not only for Italy, Spain and Greece but also for Britain. Waste in Britain is increasing by 3 per cent a year. It is predicted that present landfill space will be full in nine years.

Source: Times Online UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
And in case you're wondering where the Italian rubbish, or at least part of it after recycling, ends up...

--------------------------

From The Times
June 13, 2008
So that's where my beer cans go
Germany is recycling cans and eagerly turning them into park benches — to be used in Siberia
Roger Boyes in Berlin

For years the sorting of domestic waste in Germany — colour-coded into blue (for paper), green (grass, plants), black (food leftovers) and yellow (plastic and light metallic alloys) — had to be subsidised heavily. It was a chore even for the most conscientious of householders, a source of constant friction with refuse collectors and expensive.

Curious to find out what happens to my old beer cans, I asked the spokesman for the German recycling company. He rang me back within days and with enthusiasm. "They are compressed with other things and made into park benches!"

I found this quite a good idea and asked him to find out where these park benches were located. In my mind's eye I could see a pensioner feeding the pigeons on my squashed-up and artfully reshaped rubbish.

After a week the spokesman returned the call: "We export them to Russia," he said. "German park benches require stricter safety standards." After some more pressure I found out where: Irkutsk! My rubbish was in Siberia.

It took me another two weeks to get a chum in the Russian Embassy to find out how exactly my rubbish was doing. "Mr Boyes," drawled Alexei, after a fortnight's research, "we have winter all the time out there, nobody sits in parks, only a few madmen."

The park benches had been taken on sufferance; in all probability the Germans had had to pay the Russians to take them. Still, somewhere out there, in the corner of a warehouse in the tundra, there is my recycled rubbish, sensibly compressed, waiting for the global thaw.

Source: Times Online UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 9:19 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Burglar's bad call

A burglar was caught after he went back to his victim to ask for the return of his mobile phone. Stuart Gardner, 30, of Preston, dropped it in February while ransacking the home of a retired magician. Preston Crown Court jailed him for three years and three months.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:52 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Relative of Sweden's king sued over faked gay affair

13 June 2008
Online: http://www.thelocal.se/12410/

Gerard Bernadotte, the so-called "fake" Swedish prince, is being sued by Lufthansa airlines for over 940,000 kronor ($15,4500).

He is accused of allegedly faking a gay relationship with two Lufthansa flight attendants in order to qualify for reduced airfares, reports the Expressen newspaper.

On Tuesday Gerard Bernadotte appeared in a Hamburg court, accused of faking a serious relationship in exchange for cheap air fares, which Lufthansa offers to staff"s spouses and life partners.

The 50-year-old denied all charges of fraud and claimed to have had sex with his air attendant boyfriend every which way, "from behind and from the front".

Apparently, the couple had a dirty weekend in Bangkok last Christmas and according to Bernadotte, there were several witnesses there who can prove they are a couple.

A Lufthansa spokesman told Expressen newspaper that they didn"t wish to comment on any details regarding the case during legal proceedings.

This isn"t the first time the so-called "prince" has been in trouble. He has previously been sentenced for bank fraud.

Gerard Bernadotte has been a controversial figure ever since he was adopted by the Swedish King"s second cousin Jan Bernadotte, who is only 13 years older than his adopted son.

Since the adoption, Jan Bernadotte has since fallen out of favor with his father, the King's cousin, is more or less banned from Court. Speaking to Expressen newspaper back in 2004, Jan Bernadotte voiced his regret over the adoption and said that Gerard Bernadotte "should absolutely not call himself a Swedish prince."

So far the royal family has not taken any steps to right the matter in court, but sources claim that they are very upset about the "fake" prince"s activities.

Speaking to Expressen newspaper the Court"s information officer Ã…sa Gunnarsson said that the Court currently had no plans to take legal action against Gerard Bernadotte.

The Lufthansa trial continues in August.

Claudia Rodas (news@thelocal.se)

Source: The Local - Sweden.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 11:19 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
FIFTY police swoop on boy, 12, for taking £10 note hanging out of a cash machine

By Daily Mail Reporter
14th June 2008

More than 50 police officers swarmed on a 12-year-old boy accused of stealing a £10 note which was hanging out of a cashpoint.

The army of officers was called after a row broke out when a woman, 27, accused Pascoe Petgrave of stealing the tenner from an HSBC bank machine in Thornton Heath, south London.

Image
Pascoe Petgrave, 12, is seen in the background, being arrested by several police officers in Thornton Heath, south London

Pascoe, who stands at just 4ft 7in, said he had been given his mum's bank card to withdraw money when he spotted the note - but the woman who had been nearby claimed it belonged to her.

Pascoe's cousins - two women aged 21 and 28 - stepped in to stand up for him and a large crowd gathered before the trio were arrested on suspicion of theft.

The boy's mother Maxine, a 38-year-old nurse, who was called to the scene by the cousins, then watched in astonishment as her son was handcuffed and taken into police custody. All three cousins have since been bailed while enquiries continue.

Image
Maxine Petgrave at home with Pascoe

Mrs Petgrave said yesterday: 'He's never been in any trouble before. This was a horrific ordeal for my 12-year-old boy, he was handcuffed and put into a headlock.

'When my house was burgled a year ago I wish they had sent just one of those officers. How did a row over a £10 note hanging out of an ATM machine get to that point?'

A Croydon police spokesman confirmed they were investigating an allegation of theft of £10.

When asked why 50 officers had been present, she added: 'Police attended the scene and during the course of investigating the matter, a large crowd had gathered.

Elements of this crowd were hostile to police activity which resulted in a call for further assistance being made. That was answered by other colleagues, who subsequently attended.'

Source: Daily Mail UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Failure
PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:49 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Thief breaks into donation box, steals fake money
June 19, 2008

Image

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A thief bashed the plastic glass to get to the $1, $5, $10 and $20 bills inside the Drop-A-Note donation box in the Kentucky Theatre's lobby. But all they probably got were fistfuls of worthless paper, fake bills layered inside to hide the real cash.

"It's sad when idiots can't tell fake money from the real thing," said Steve Brown, president of Kentucky's Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ Project, whose group is using the proceeds from the box to restore a Wurlitzer organ and return it to Kentucky.

The fake bills were black and white and didn't even have serial numbers, Brown said.

The thief, who struck early June 2, made off with little or no money because the box had been emptied that weekend, Brown said.

Since the box was installed at the Kentucky Theatre seven years ago, thieves have periodically loosened the screws, lifted the cover and taken money out, Brown said, probably stealing about $400 in that time.

New, vandal-proof screws that had been installed did their job by being difficult to unscrew. But the thief got into the box this time by smashing in the glass in with a heavy hammer or mallet, Brown said.

The Drop-A-Note box, which will cost $100 to $200 to repair, will be back in the Kentucky Theatre's lobby in a week or two.

___
Information from: Lexington Herald-Leader, http://www.kentucky.com

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 2254 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 151  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group