TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Fri Oct 19, 2018 5:33 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 923 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 62  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 8:23 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Image

Welcome to the continuation of the Chess Corner, where only serious topics are posted.

Keep reading. :smile:


:lovesign:

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 8:28 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Violence, vaccine fears keep polio from disappearing
25 March 2013

Image
An Afghan health worker administers polio vaccination drops to a child on the outskirts of Mihtarlam on March 11, 2013.

AFP - Sixty years after the first successful polio vaccine trial, the disease has been wiped out in much of the world, but violence, conspiracy theories and lack of cash keep it from disappearing.

"The world is closer than ever to eradicating polio," said Oliver Rosenbauer, spokesman for the World Health Organization's Global Polio Eradication Initiative. In 2012, there were just 223 infections worldwide, compared to 360,000 in 1988, when the United Nations launched a campaign to eliminate the highly contagious illness that causes paralysis and sometimes death, particularly in young children. All but six of last year's cases were in three countries: Nigeria (122), Pakistan (58) and Afghanistan (37), according to the WHO.

The success seen in India, which has had no new cases in two years, shows that eradicating polio is "technically feasible," Rosenbauer told AFP. "So now the question is, does the world want to do this? Does it have enough political will to do this?"

Image
Graphic showing polio statistics around the world.

If the virus is not eliminated, the number of cases could return to a level of 200,000 new infections annually within 10 years, he warned. But efforts to end the disease face mounting risks brought on by violence against vaccine workers in the disease's last bastions. In Nigeria and Pakistan, some religious figures say the vaccine contains pork, which Muslims are forbidden from consuming, or that it renders people infertile as part of an alleged Western plot to sterilize Muslims.

Dozens of health workers have been killed in attacks on vaccination stations in recent months, particularly in remote areas -- with at least 10 killed in northern Nigeria and 20 in Pakistan since December. In Pakistan, some believe the CIA used polio vaccines as a cover for a campaign to obtain DNA samples from people in order to root out Al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, who was killed in a US raid in 2011. "There is no question that these groups fighting the polio vaccination effort are a challenge to polio eradication," said Carol Pandak, who heads an anti-polio program at the charitable organization Rotary International.

Image
A health worker vaccinates a child against polio at a public health centre in Kano, northern Nigerian, on February 13, 2013.

In order to break down hostilities, international polio workers have held meetings with local religious leaders and the governments of the countries concerned. The goal is to communicate on a local level "so they can learn more about the benefits of immunization and we can hear their concerns," said Pandak. But money remains a problem. Pandak said the global anti-polio campaign is short 660 million dollars in 2013, or more than half the annual budget of a billion dollars that experts say is necessary. The funds come mainly from G8 countries, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rotary International and other donors.

Eradicating polio could lead to success against other illnesses, such as measles, according to Walter Orenstein, chairman of the WHO's Technical Consultative Group on the Global Eradication of Poliomyelitis. "I think the polio effort has the potential to draw in a lot of expertise to tackle other diseases in the future," he told AFP.

Image
A Pakistani health worker participates in a polio vaccination campaign under guard at a school in Kohat, Pakistan, on January 31, 2013.

American Jonas Salk developed the first polio vaccine, testing it on volunteers, including himself and his family, before announcing the first successful trial results in 1953. In 1955, the vaccine was declared safe and effective for release on the world market. "The success of the polio vaccine required a real coordinated effort," said Orenstein. "The polio virus is an enemy of humankind. By eradicating it, it's a gift from this generation to all future generations."

Source: france24.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 10:35 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
'Just a few looters’: Turkish PM Erdogan dismisses protests as thousands occupy Istanbul's Taksim Square
by Jose Miguel Calatayud
Sunday, 2 June 2013



Turkey’s Prime Minister has rejected claims from protesters, who have taken to the streets across the country over the past two days, that he is an authoritarian leader, as thousands of people marched and reoccupied the centre of Istanbul.

Protesters returned to Istanbul's Taksim Square on Sunday, the site where a small protest over plans to redevelop a park spiralled into violent confrontations on Friday when police moved to evict the demonstrators.

The heavy-handed tactics of authorities sparked more than 90 demonstrations around the country on Friday and Saturday, officials said. More than 1,000 people have been injured in Istanbul and several hundred more in Ankara, according to medical staff. In Taksim Square on Sunday afternoon, people were chanting slogans against Mr Erdogan and calling for him to resign. Undeterred, Mr Erdogan used a television interview to rebuke the demonstrators, who he dismissed as "a few looters".

"[They say] Tayyip Erdogan is a dictator. If they call one who serves the people a dictator, I cannot say anything," said the Prime Minister during a televised speech. Erdogan insisted the project to revamp Gezi Park would go on despite the protests. "We will build a mosque in Taksim and we do not need the permission of the CHP [Republican People's Party, the main opposition party in Parliament] or of a few bums to do it."

People have been protesting what they describe as the "authoritarian" attitude of the government and the heavy-handed way in which the police dealt with a peaceful sit-in in Gezi Park, next to Taksim. Mr Erdogan's government wants to redevelop the park to build a shopping centre. The confrontation between mostly peaceful protesters and the riot police became almost a pitched battle late on Friday and went on until late on Saturday, when the police finally withdrew from Taksim.

More than 1,000 people were detained, according to the Ministry of the Interior, and more than 100 wounded, according to medical staff, even though many protesters put this figure much higher. Anger was still palpable on the streets of Istanbul yesterday, as many questioned whether the unrest felt by many across the country would translate into an anti-government movement.

"People were afraid of being beaten and of being gassed, but we have shown that we are not anymore," said Halil Sertbulut, a 37-year-old PhD candidate in political science, speaking in Taksim Square. "Finally the people of Turkey have become politically active", he added.

"[Erdogan] is behaving like a dictator, we want him to give up his decisions and to leave the government," said Zuhal Unsal, a 28-year-old nurse, while her group of friends nodded in approval. Another protester, Nedim Sarfati, a 22-year-old waiter, threatened "war in the streets" unless the Prime Minister resigned. "We need to show him our anger because he doesn't know," he said.

Source: The Independent UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Israel to send African migrants to third country
3 June 2013
By MAX J. ROSENTHAL

Image
In this Jan. 10, 2012 file photo, migrant workers from Africa gather at an outdoor square in Tel Aviv. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty, File)

JERUSALEM (AP) -- Israel has reached an agreement to send thousands of African migrants to an unidentified country, according to a court document obtained Monday, a plan that has elicited criticism over its potential harm to the migrants.

The plan, if implemented, is an attempt to address one of Israel's more pressing issues: what to do with an influx of roughly 60,000 African migrants who have sneaked into Israel from Egypt over the past eight years.

Their arrivals have put Israel in a bind. Many Israelis believe that the Jewish state, founded in part as a refuge for Holocaust survivors after World War II, has a responsibility to help the downtrodden. But others fear that taking in tens of thousands of Africans will threaten the country's Jewish character and question the extent of Israel's moral obligations beyond those of other nations. Most of the migrants have come from Eritrea or Sudan, some fleeing repressive regimes and others looking for work.

Over the past year, Israel has taken a series of steps to halt the influx. It built a fence along the border with Egypt that has reduced the number of new arrivals from hundreds each month to just a trickle. Since last summer, it has imprisoned new arrivals while officials determine whether they meet the criteria for refugee status. Last year, Israel offered some migrants cash to leave voluntarily, warning they would be expelled otherwise.

Thousands of Africans still live in slums in Tel Aviv and other cities. Israel has been unable to deport most of them because they would face harm if they returned to their countries of origin.

According to the document, a state lawyer told the Israeli Supreme Court on Sunday that a deal was reached with an unidentified country to absorb some migrants and that Israel was in talks with two other countries to secure a similar agreement. The details of the arrangement were not disclosed, although the state's lawyer, Yochi Gnesin, said the return of migrants would be "gradual."

Later Monday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu voted in favor of a bill prohibiting migrants from removing money from the country before their final departure. "We have stopped the infiltration phenomenon into Israel. Last month only two infiltrators entered Israel, compared to more than 2,000 a year ago. Now we are focused on the infiltrators leaving," he said in a statement.

Critics said the deal reflects an abdication of responsibility by Israel and that Israel will not be able to properly monitor the migrants' conditions once they are deported. Tally Kritzman-Amir, an immigration law expert at the Academic Center for Law and Business in Tel Aviv, said that Israel could neither effectively supervise the conditions of deported migrants nor guarantee they would not be sent back to their home countries in the future. "It is possible to transfer the migrants to a third country," she said, "but the primary responsibility to the rights of the refugees still lies with Israel."

Under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, states are obligated not to send refugees to countries where they would face physical or political danger. It is not clear whether that obligates signatories, of which Israel is one, to monitor the refugees indefinitely after they are deported.

Few other details on the deal were immediately available. Israeli Army Radio reported the country was in east Africa and did not suffer from any unrest that would harm the migrants. Kritzman-Amir said that would make Uganda and South Sudan, which both have good relations with Israel, likely candidates, but she did not have inside information.

Gnesin said the countries involved in absorbing the migrants were doing so "in exchange for one thing or another," although it was not clear what they would receive in return. The Haaretz daily said that Israel had agreed to provide agricultural expertise as part of the deal.

The Supreme Court on Sunday ordered the government to provide details of the arrangement, including the name of the African country, within seven days.

Source: AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 2:13 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
:goodjob:

Sounds like a good practical idea to me. Most of the migrants are not refugees but economic migrants. As such they have no right to any refugee status, nor any other right, for that matter, and should be immediately deported for being in the country illegally.

:smile:

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 3:47 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Egyptian politicians: Sabotage Ethiopia's new dam
3 June 2013
By HAMZA HENDAWI

Image
In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013 file, a traditional felucca sailing boat carries a cargo of hay as it transits the Nile river passing the Pyramids of Giza in Cairo, Egypt. Politicians meeting with Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi have proposed hostile acts against Ethiopia to try and stop it from building a massive dam over the River Nile. Some of the politicians attending Monday’s meeting with President Mohammed Morsi were not it was carried live on television. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)

CAIRO (AP) -- Politicians meeting with Egypt's president on Monday proposed hostile acts against Ethiopia, including backing rebels and carrying out sabotage, to stop it from building a massive dam on the Nile River upstream.

Some of the politicians appeared unaware the meeting with President Mohammed Morsi was being carried live on TV. Morsi did not directly react to the suggestions, but said in concluding remarks that Egypt respects Ethiopia and its people and will not engage in any aggressive acts against the East African nation.

Morsi called the meeting to review the impact of Ethiopia's $4.2 billion hydroelectric dam, which would be Africa's largest. Egypt in the past has threatened to go to war over its "historic rights" to Nile River water. Morsi's office later said he had directed his foreign and irrigation ministers to maintain contact with the Ethiopian government to obtain more information on the dam and its likely impact on Egypt's share of the Nile water. His office's statement included an ominous-sounding note, saying: "Egypt will never surrender its right to Nile water and all options (to safeguard it) are being considered."

Ethiopia last week started diverting the flow of the Nile to make way for its hydroelectric plant dubbed the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. On completion, it is expected to produce 6,000 megawatts, and its reservoir is scheduled to start filling next year.

An independent panel of experts has concluded that the dam will not significantly affect downstream Sudan and Egypt, which are highly dependent on the water of the world's longest river, said an Ethiopian official, who spoke Saturday on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly on the topic.

But in Cairo on Monday, Younis Makhyoun, leader of an ultraconservative Islamist party, said Egypt should back rebels in Ethiopia or, as a last resort, destroy the dam. He said Egypt made a "strategic error" when it did not object to the dam's construction. Makhyoun said Ethiopia is "fragile" because of rebel movements inside the country. "We can communicate with them and use them as a bargaining chip against the Ethiopian government," he said. "If all this fails, then there is no choice left for Egypt but to play the final card, which is using the intelligence service to destroy the dam," said Makhyoun, whose Nour party won about 25 percent of parliament's seats in elections in late 2011 and early 2012.

Another politician, liberal Ayman Nour, proposed spreading rumors about Egypt obtaining refueling aircraft to create the impression that it plans an airstrike to destroy the dam. "This could yield results on the diplomatic track," Nour said.

Abu al-Ila Madi, leader of the pro-Morsi Islamist Wasat party, suggested that a rumor that Egypt planned to destroy the dam could scare the Ethiopians into cooperating with Egypt on the project.

Magdy Hussein, another Islamist politician, warned that talk of military action against Ethiopia is "very dangerous" and will only turn Ethiopians into enemies. He suggested soft diplomacy in dealing with the crisis, including organizing a film festival in Ethiopia and dispatching researchers and translation missions.

Ethiopia's decision to construct the dam challenges a colonial-era agreement that had given Egypt and Sudan rights to the Nile water, with Egypt taking 55.5 billion cubic meters and Sudan 18.5 billion cubic meters of 84 billion cubic meters, with 10 billion lost to evaporation. That agreement, first signed in 1929, took no account of the eight other nations along the 6,700-kilometer (4,160-mile) river and its basin, which have been agitating for a decade for a more equitable accord.

Ethiopian Minister of Water and Energy Alemayehu Tegenu has said Egypt should not worry about a diminished water share. "We don't have any irrigation projects around the dam. The dam is solely intended for electricity production ... So there should not be any concerns about a diminished water flow," Alemayehu told The Associated Press on Saturday.

Eighty-five percent of Nile waters originate in Ethiopia, yet the nation utilizes very little of them, and the country has become synonymous with famine.

Source: AP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:05 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Turkish protests: John Kerry voices concern over police use of force
by Constanze Letsch and Ian Traynor
Tuesday, 4 June 2013



The US has called for an investigation into the political violence in Turkey and urged restraint on all sides following the fifth day of escalating nationwide protests against the rule of the prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

In remarks that are likely to provoke Erdogan, the US secretary of state, John Kerry, said: "We are concerned by the reports of excessive use of force by police. We obviously hope that there will be a full investigation of those incidents and full restraint from the police force." Earlier on Monday, Erdogan warned protesters against taking the country's political disputes on to the streets, signalling he could mobilise his mass popular support to crush the demonstrations.

Sporadic clashes between protesters and riot police continued in Izmir, Ankara and Istanbul, and two deaths were confirmed. Mehmet Ayvalitas, 20, was hit by a car on Sunday that struck protesters in the Mayis district of Istanbul, reports said. Later Abdullah Comert, 22, died from serious gunshot wounds in the southern city of Antalya, according to the local governor's office, which said the shooter was unidentified.

Erdogan, meanwhile, lashed out at his critics, delivering an uncompromising message after a week of the worst violent turmoil of his decade in power. Erdogan's Justice and Development party (AKP) took just over half the national vote in the last elections in 2011. Invoking that mandate, the prime minister said: "There is 50% and we can barely keep them at home. But we have called on them to calm down." Erdogan gave similar warnings on Saturday in his first response to the turmoil that saw the centre of Istanbul turned into a battleground over the weekend as hundreds of thousands of people across the country took to the streets enraged at heavy-handing riot police handling of a demonstration last Friday.

The turmoil started a week ago as a small environmental protest in an Istanbul park against redevelopment plans, but quickly mushroomed into huge weekend clashes with riot police in the city and across half the country after police mounted tear gas and water cannon attacks on peaceful civilians. The focus of the protest shifted from the building project to the person of the prime minister.

Erdogan's dismissive attitude to the mass demonstrations contrasted increasingly with President Abdullah Gul, who sounded conciliatory and pointedly rebutted Erdogan's message. "Democracy does not mean elections alone," he said, in what appeared to be a sharp riposte to the prime minister's repeated insistence on the strength of his parliamentary mandate. "There can be nothing more natural for the expression of various views, various situations and objections through a variety of ways, besides elections," the president said.

The prime minister has challenged the rights of the initial protesters in a central Istanbul park to launch a sit-in opposing a redevelopment scheme demolishing the green space to make way for a shopping complex, mosque, and a replica of an old military barracks.

Government data showed 1,500 arrests in Ankara, 300 in Izmir, and another 370 in the southern town of Adana. The impact of the sudden eruption of political turbulence was also felt by Turkey's business community in what has been one of the world's fastest-growing economies in recent years. Istanbul's stock exchange fell by 10.47%, the worst one-day decline in a decade. The prime minister brushed off the news. "Bourse indexes increase and decrease, they are not always stable. When we came to power, the National 100 Index was around 11,000. It might increase to 100,000 tomorrow."

An Istanbul professor and one of his students both lost eyes when police hit them in the face with tear gas canisters on Sunday night, it was confirmed.

In a further sign of spreading instability, the Turkish military said there had been an exchange of fire between its forces and Kurdish guerrillas of the Kurdistan Workers' party (PKK) in Sirnak, in the south-east. The two sides have been observing a ceasefire as the PKK stages a withdrawal from Turkey into northern Iraq as part of an incipient peace process since the start of the year. The reported clash was the first known breach of the truce. The army claim could not be corroborated.

Kerry's expression of concern about the response by the Turkish authorities was followed by a series of rebukes across Washington on Monday as the US sought to distance itself from one of its most important regional allies over the affair. White House spokesman Jay Carney said the US had "serious concerns about the reports of excessive use of force by police and large numbers of injuries and damage to property". The protests come at an awkward time for the US which is trying to convince the international community that governments in Syria and Iran do not respect the rights of their citizens while the Turkish-backed rebels in Syria represent a more democratic alternative.

Tensions remained high in Istanbul on Monday, with protesters still commanding the rebellion's focal point, Taksim Square. Trade unions are threatening to mobilise a general strike and several Turkish universities have postponed final examinations – a move seen as encouraging the students to take part in the wave of protest without jeopardising their academic prospects.

The prime minister blamed the sudden eruption of protest against him on unspecified foreign powers or elements. "Our intelligence work is ongoing," he said. "It is not possible to reveal their names … We shall be discussing these with them and will be following up, in fact we will also settle accounts with them."

Source: Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Turkey: 1,500 arrested overnight, opposition MP says
3 June, 2013

(ANSAmed) - ANKARA - At least 1,500 demonstrators have been arrested overnight and detained in unlawful conditions, Turkish opposition MP Aylin Nazliaka told Hurriyet online newspaper on Monday.

Security forces herded detainees onto city buses at Kizilay, in the center of the capital, where a demonstration was underway near the president's office. ''They were packed like sardines in a can, with no room to breathe'', Nazliaka told the newspaper.

Source: ANSAmed.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:35 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Turkey: 'sultan' Erdogan trips over 600 trees
3 June, 2013
by Francesco Cerri



(ANSAmed) - ANKARA - 'Erdogan is not all-powerful' observes, almost with surprise, Hurriyet's analyst Murat Yetkin.

A protest which began as a demonstration against the destruction of 600 trees in Gezi Park in Taksim, in the heart of European Istanbul, which was unilaterally decided by the local government controlled by the Islamic AKP party of Premier Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has become a mass movement which has brought to the streets hundreds of thousands of Turkish citizens.

They are the 'secular people' of the founding father of the modern republic in 1923 , Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, over the ruins of the Islamic empire. They are now unexpectedly shaking the authoritarian government of 'sultan' Erdogan, who has been ruling without rivals since 2002. For the first time in 11 years, he was forced in just a few hours to recant his position. At midday he challenged tens of thousands of demonstrators in Taksim announcing that 'police will remain today, tomorrow and the day after tomorrow'.

Two days later, confronted with rage on the streets, the spreading uprising across Turkey, protests from abroad over police brutality, and the intervention of head of state Abdullah Gul, the 'sultan' changed stance. He recalled police and admitted 'excesses', promising an investigation. Ever since then, in spite of statements that remain muscular, he has been looking for a way out. He sent Istanbul's mayor to talk to the demonstrators. But the country is now aware that the power of the most powerful premier since Ataturk is not unlimited.

After many humiliations, secular Turkey, which was ousted from power 11 years ago, appears to have decided to take matters into its hands and take to the streets. According to polls, Erdogan would still win from 40 to 50% of the vote. The year 2014 will be one of local, national and presidential elections.

Erdogan wants to become head of state with a constitutional reform giving him sweeping powers. But his electorate is not monolithic. There are religious voters, the great masses of Anatolia who are proud of an Islamic government which has given them a voice. But there is also a part of the electorate who voted for him because he has given stability to the country since 2002, tripling pro-capita income and turned Turkey into the 17th world economy. However, these voters are not ready to give up on a secular state in favour of an Islamic republic. The disastrous management of the protests has acted as a detonator.

Erdogan 'shot himself on the foot', said analyst Sule Kulu. The premier 'did what the opposition was unable to do in years', he said, 'he created a new opposition, formed by different groups of the population, including those who fully supported him in the past'.

In the third legislature in power since June 2011, the premier has adopted an increasingly authoritarian stance, promoting an Islamic society. Bans dating back to the Ataturk era on, among other things, the Islamic veil, fell one after the other, mosques are being built everywhere, the Ottoman past is being reevaluated and progress is being made towards the approval of Islamic-inspired laws changing people's lifestyles.

The latest restrictions on alcohol were the last drop. There is also the Syrian crisis with Erdogan firmly siding with Sunni rebels against his former Alawite friend Bashar al-Assad while the country was asking him to remain neutral. The war is now threatening Turkey. As in the case of the Arab Springs, what sparked the revolt against Erdogan, according to political analyst Emre Uslu, is that secularists lost hope of ousting him from power through the vote. And they fear this will lead to a 're-Islamization' of the country. The opposition now recalls how Erdogan used to say 20 years ago that democracy is like a bus, you get out of it when you want.

Source: ANSAmed.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 7:55 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
For hard-hit Greeks, IMF mea culpa comes too late
By Lefteris Papadimas and Renee Maltezou
June 6, 2013

Image
People walk in a commercial street in Athens, May 30, 2013

(Reuters) - Greeks reacted with an air of vindication and outrage at the International Monetary Fund's admission it erred in its handling of the country's bailout, berating an apology that comes too late to salvage an economy and countless lives in ruins.

Anger was palpable on the streets of Athens, where the EU-IMF austerity recipe that the Washington-based fund says it sharply misjudged has left rows of shuttered stores and many scrounging for scraps of food in trash cans.

"Really? Thanks for letting us know but we can't forgive you," said Apostolos Trikalinos, a 59-year old garbage collector and a father of two. "Let's not fool ourselves. They'll never give us anything back. I'm sorry for all the people who killed themselves because of austerity. How are we going to bring them back? How?"

The IMF acknowledged on Wednesday that it underestimated the damage done to Greece's economy from spending cuts and tax hikes imposed in a bailout, which was accompanied by one of the worst economic collapses ever experienced by a country in peacetime. A report looking back on the bailout said the Fund veered from its own standards to overestimate how much debt Greece could bear, and should have pushed harder and sooner for private lenders to take a "haircut" to reduce Greece's debt burden.

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras told reporters the acknowledgment justified his positions. He had criticized from the outset "what the IMF has called mistakes". "And we have been correcting those mistakes over the past year," Samaras told reporters during a visit to Helsinki.

Greeks have seen their incomes plunge by about a third since the debt crisis erupted in 2009 and prompted Greece to seek two bailouts from the EU and the IMF. The unemployment rate has hit nearly 27 percent and suicide rates have soared. Worst hit have been the youth, nearly 60 percent of whom are unemployed.

"The IMF admits to the crime," the leftist Avgi newspaper declared on its front page. Top selling newspaper Ta Nea branded it an "admission of failure". In the corridors of power, some officials suggested the admission could strengthen their hand in future talks with the IMF, European Union and European Central Bank, collectively known as the troika, on debt relief or new austerity measures. "It is positive that the report recognizes that there were mistakes in Greece's program in the past and we hope that they will not be repeated in the future and then create the need for corrective action," a senior government official told Reuters.

VINDICATION

For many Greek politicians who complained for years that they were forced to sign off on the bailouts under the threat of a chaotic default and euro zone exit, it was also a moment of vindication.

"The IMF report confirms and records the positions that we have repeatedly presented in public, which formed the basis of our arguments during tough negotiations with the IMF and the other two parties of the troika," former Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos told Reuters. "There are many choices that we would have never made on our own, but we were obliged to take in order to avoid the worst."

Venizelos, who now leads the Socialist PASOK party in the ruling coalition, negotiated Greece's second bailout in 2012 after reluctantly backing the first bailout. His predecessor, George Papaconstantinou, who negotiated the first bailout in 2010, declined to comment. Other former officials felt the Greek position was finally being given its due. "I feel vindicated like most of the Greeks who felt that they have been punished more than they deserved by the troika", said Pantelis Kapsis, the government spokesman under the former technocrat Prime Minister Lucas Papademos's government.

All political parties - especially the leftist, anti-bailout front - are likely to claim victory from the IMF admitting it misjudged the impact of austerity on Greece's economy, but Samaras, in particular, could leverage it into a bargaining chip in future talks with EU and IMF, say analysts. "It makes it easier for the Greek government to say 'slow down all on these measures' that have led to six years of recession and record high unemployment," said Theodore Couloumbis from the ELIAMEP foreign policy think-tank. "It's like going to a doctor who's been treating you for cancer when you fundamentally had Parkinson's and the doctor says, 'I'm sorry.'"

The apology could also begin to heal the wounded pride and humiliation that Greeks felt from being portrayed as lazy, overpaid and living off the largesse of hard-working northern Europeans. "The recognition of this mistake is part of the credibility which has been restored in the country and may become the starting point for Greeks to get part of what they have lost so far," said Dimitris Mavros, head of the MRB pollsters.

(Additional reporting by George Georgiopoulos and Karolina Tagaris; Writing by Deepa Babington; Editing by Peter Graff)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:04 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
I like this comment:

nialet wrote:
Iceland Did It Right … In Iceland, the people have made the government resign, the primary banks have been nationalized, it was decided to not pay the debt that these created with Great Britain and Holland due to their bad financial politics, and a public assembly has been created to rewrite
the constitution.
And all of this in a peaceful way. A whole revolution against the powers that have created the current global crisis. This is why there hasn’t been any publicity during the last two years:
What would happen if the rest of the EU citizens took this as an example?
What would happen if the US citizens took this as an example.

So in summary of the Icelandic revolution:

-resignation of the whole government

-nationalization of the bank.

-referendum so that the people can decide over the economic decisions.

-incarcerating the responsible parties

-rewriting of the constitution by its people

Have we been informed of this through the media?
 Has any political program in radio or TV commented on this? 
No! The Icelandic people have been able to show that there is a way to beat the system and has given a democracy lesson to the world.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:10 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Russia announces permanent Mediterranean naval presence
By Alexei Anishchuk
June 6, 2013

Image
A Turkish Navy cost guard boat (L) escorts the Russian Navy destroyer Smetlivy, in the Bosphorus in Istanbul July 11, 2012. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

(Reuters) - Russia has deployed a naval unit to the Mediterranean Sea, it said on Thursday, a move President Vladimir Putin said was to defend Russian security but which comes as Moscow faces off with the West over Syria.

In what is Russia's first permanent naval deployment in the Mediterranean since Soviet times, it has stationed 16 warships and three ship-based helicopters in the region, the chief of staff said. Putin said the deployment was not "saber-rattling" and not meant as a threat to any nation. Russia cooperates with NATO navies against piracy and its ships call at Western ports.

But its support for President Bashar al-Assad as he fights rebels have put Moscow at odds with the West. "This is a strategically important region and we have tasks to carry out there to provide for the national security of the Russian Federation," Putin said.

Large-scale naval exercises Russia held in March and ship movements near Syria have been seen in the West as muscle-flexing by Moscow, which has sold weapons to Assad's government and shielded it from any action by the U.N. Security Council. Russia also has a naval maintenance and supply facility in Syria.

The announcement comes days after Moscow said it planned to resume patrols by nuclear-armed submarines in the southern seas as part of a Putin's broader effort to revive Russia's military might. Putin has stressed the importance of a strong military since returning to the presidency last May. In 13 years in power, he has often cited external threats when talking of the need for agile armed forces and Russian political unity.

(Reporting By Alexei Anishchuk; Editing by Steve Guttreman and Robin Pomeroy)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 1:38 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Golden Dawn: 'Greece belongs to Greeks. Long live victory!'
by Helena Smith
Saturday, 1 June 2013

Image
Members and supporters of Golden Dawn chant the national anthem in front of the Greek parliament. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

It wasn't just that their symbols looked like swastikas. Or that thousands of Greek flags filled the marble square beneath the Acropolis. Or that they were marking the 560th anniversary of the fall of Constantinople.

It was that there were so many of them. Angry men and angry women furiously screaming "Greece belongs to Greeks" in the heart of ancient Athens, as tourists – some befuddled, some shocked – looked on or fled at the sight of neo-Nazis coming to town.

"Now we are in the thousands," thundered Nikos Michaloliakos, the bespectacled mathematician who leads Greece's far-right Golden Dawn party. "Long live victory!"

Like the soldiers on whom they model themselves, the Greeks who subscribe to the ultra-nationalist, neo-fascist dogma of Golden Dawn are the first to say they are at war. This week, as Antonis Samaras's coalition government struggled to contain an escalating crisis over efforts to curb the extremists, it was they who appeared to be winning that war.

Amid a dramatic surge in attacks on immigrants blamed on the neo-Nazis, the debt-stricken country's ruling alliance has come under unprecedented pressure to crack down on racially motivated crimes. Legislation calling for a ban on parties perceived to incite such violence was proposed by prime minister Samaras's two junior leftist partners last month. Claiming that it would "victimise" Golden Dawn, which has 18 of the 300 MPs in parliament, the conservative groups last week rejected the bill as counterproductive. On Friday they put forward their own, less punitive law.

As parliament prepares to debate how best to apply legislation that will curb the party, – measures that have unexpectedly electrified the political scene – the far right is flourishing in the knowledge that, in a country reeling from the twin ills of austerity and despair, it is they who are in the ascendant. Since elections last year, Golden Dawn's appeal has almost doubled, with successive polls showing support of between 11% and 12% for the neo-fascists. Privately pollsters acknowledge that, as Greece's third-strongest and fastest-growing political force, the group could garner as much as 15% of support in local elections next year.

"It is wrong to believe that they are an ephemeral phenomenon," said Professor Dimitris Kerides, who teaches political science at Athens' Panteion University. "They are not only a product of this country's economic crisis. There is something sick in Greek society that Golden Dawn expresses," he added, referring to the rise in "Greek-only" blood banks and food rallies organised by the extremists. "They are here to stay. And as of 2014 they are going to be everywhere, with access to state resources because, for sure, they will win seats in municipal elections and, in some towns, place mayors."

Emboldened by success, the neo-Nazis have become ever more visible. Across Greece, party branches have been opened at a record pace, with pupils actively recruited in schools. In villages, black-clad supporters proudly sporting the party's insignia have proliferated, and in the southern Peloponnese, traditionally a stronghold of the right, Golden Dawn graffiti are scrawled over the roads and even rocks that dot the landscape of seaside resorts and archaeological sites.

Racially motivated violence has soared to such a degree that European officials blasted Greece for failing to take adequate action. Nils Muižnieks, the European commissioner for human rights, recently felt moved to point out that democracy was at risk in the birthplace of democracy because of "the upsurge in hate crime and a weak state response". It was vital, he said, that domestic and international anti-racism laws were enforced to crack down on violence that had been "linked to members or supporters, including parliamentarians, of the neo-Nazi political party Golden Dawn".

The Greek police and justice systems – both of which have been accused of colluding with the extremists – also had to be reformed, he said.

Indicative of the far right's growing political grip, the conservatives fear that legislation proposed by their leftwing partners will further alienate traditional voters who have migrated to Golden Dawn in disgust at the political establishment blamed for the country's crisis. The party's spectacular rise has been attributed, in part, to defections from the Greek orthodox church and the army.

"The whole thing is a mess," said Dimitris Psarras, an investigative journalist who has followed the group since its incipiency on the collapse of military rule in 1974. "Even if the law is passed, the message that is conveyed is that democracy is divided in knowing what to do with this neo-Nazi threat." For too long, said Psarras, Greeks had watched with complacency as the far-right group went from strength to strength.

Just as in Weimar Germany, when Hitler's National Socialist German Workers' party rose from obscurity, opponents have remained eerily quiet. Until last week, when the 92-year-old poet Nanos Valaoritis deplored Golden Dawn as "having all the characteristics of the party which led Germany to destruction", few in Greece's political or intellectual elite had been willing to take on the extremists.

The lack of public debate has added to the mystique of an organisation whose workings remain opaque. The local media appears to have missed the story of Golden Dawn. To this day, the party's financial backers and advisers remain shrouded in secrecy. "Few in the establishment have openly addressed the danger of Golden Dawn and almost no one in the media has looked into it," lamented Psarras. "Only now is it being taken seriously, but in my mind that could be too late."

Capitalising on the deep wells of antipathy towards mainstream politicians, the far right has begun targeting the middle class. In recent months Golden Dawn offices have appeared in affluent areas around Athens. Greece's petit bourgeoisie of shopkeepers and small businessmen has, like civil servants, suffered most from crushing budget cuts demanded by the EU and IMF in return for emergency aid. In an atmosphere thick with resentment and rage, immigrants from Asia and Africa have made easy scapegoats, with growing numbers of Greeks blaming foreigners for the country's record rate of unemployment – at over 27%, the worst in the eurozone.

"Anger always wants a target," said the prominent clinical psychologist, Dr Iphigenia Macri. "Golden Dawn provides a target, which is immigrants. It is targeting all that anger and sense of abuse that, collectively, Greek people feel at the hands of the government and state."

In a bid to keep passions at bay among a population that reached boiling point long ago, the government has desperately tried to convince Greeks that, three years after the onset of their worst crisis in modern times, there is "light at the end of the tunnel". Optimism has been propelled by economic progress. However, the neo-Nazis' rise defies any notion that all is well. "The victorious party is Golden Dawn," said political commentator Nikos Xydakis. "Real life is very removed from the success story the government is selling. The neo-Nazis have succeeded not only in demystifying brutality; they are a reflection of the fear and poverty in this country."

Source: Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 4:20 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Defendants cheered at 'show trial' of anti-Putin protesters
By Maria Tsvetkova
June 6, 2013

Image
Defendants facing trial over clashes with the police during an anti-Putin protest last year, gesture inside a glass-walled cage before a court hearing in Moscow, June 6, 2013.
REUTERS-Sergei Karpukhin

(Reuters) - Supporters clapped and chanted "Freedom" in a Moscow courthouse on Thursday as 12 Russians went before a judge charged with mass disorder during a protest against President Vladimir Putin.

The protesters, several of them students, could face long prison terms if convicted over clashes with police in May last year on the eve of Putin's return to the presidency. Putin critics liken the case to Soviet-era show trials and say the result will be decided in the Kremlin. They say the prosecutions are part of a new clampdown on dissent by Putin, now in his third term as president.

All 10 men are in pre-trial custody and were led into a cramped courtroom cage before guards removed their handcuffs. A 19-year-old woman who was dragged by the neck by a camouflage officer at the protest last year is under house arrest, and the other female defendant cannot leave Russia. Both female defendants were in court but not inside the cage. "This is a Stalin-style trial," said Georgy Satarov, a former aide to the late President Boris Yeltsin and now head of INDEM, a think-tank. "This is revenge ... It's an attempt to use fear to stop the growth of the protest movement."

Image
Relatives and acquaintances of the defendants facing trial over clashes with the police during an anti-Putin protest last year, react before a court hearing in Moscow, June 6, 2013. REUTERS-Sergei Karpukhin

No date has been set for the trial. The judge rejected a motion to disqualify herself, saying a defense claim of bias was groundless, and extended the custody of the defendants for six months before adjourning the hearing until Friday.

"NEW GENERATION OF POLITICAL PRISONERS"

Putin has signed laws activists say restrict freedoms, and civic groups are under pressure from the state over foreign funding. Prominent opposition leader Alexei Navalny could be jailed for 10 years if convicted of theft in a trial he says is Putin's revenge for his activism. "Putin is cracking down harder than ever and is showing he is willing to create a new generation of political prisoners unseen since the days of Stalin," former world chess champion Garry Kasparov, who is outside Russia and fears he may be prosecuted if he returns, said on Facebook on Thursday.

Most of the 12 defendants at the pre-trial hearing held behind closed doors on Thursday are in their 20s and could be jailed for eight years if convicted. The rally on the eve of Putin's inauguration followed several peaceful protests that were fuelled by claims of fraud in a parliamentary election and dismay at Putin's decision to return to the Kremlin after a stint as prime minister.

Image
Denis Lutskevich (R), one of the defendants facing trial over clashes with the police during an anti-Putin protest last year, looks out from a glass-walled cage before a court hearing in Moscow, June 6, 2013. REUTERS-Sergei Karpukhin

Putin denies he is seeking to stifle dissent, saying people have the right to protest peacefully but condemning violence against police. In April, he denied he had returned "elements of Stalinism" but said Russia needed "order and discipline." The protests were the biggest of Putin's 13 years in power, but they have since dwindled. A new opposition march is planned for June 12 along a route ending at Bolotnaya Square, the site of the protest the defendants are being tried for.

Artist Andrei Barabanov, one of nearly 30 people facing trial or prosecution over the May 6, 2012 protest, was dragged away so roughly by police that an ambulance was called for him. Like most of the defendants he has no previous criminal record and says all he did was defend himself against police. Police say protesters struck them with plastic flagpoles and metal crowd barriers and that some hurled chunks of asphalt. They said more than 40 officers were hurt.

"What I saw was mass disorder on the part of the police," said Barabanov's girlfriend Yekaterina, who declined to give her last name. She called the case a "huge pile of lies".

(Additional reporting and writing by Alissa de Carbonnel; Editing by Steve Gutterman and Mike Collett-White)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 6:10 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Make Aids history
by Elton John
Friday, 7 June 2013

Image
'When people with HIV take antiviral drugs to stay healthy, their risk of passing on the virus drops dramatically. This is a game-changer.' Photograph: Yannick Tylle/Corbis

This month the UK will once again host the leaders of the eight richest economies in the world – the G8. Their goal: to review global priorities.

The humanitarian focus will be on nutrition. Understandably so: one in eight of the world's population experience hunger, and 2 million children die every year.

It's laudable that, despite our domestic woes, we are still able to prioritise the needs of those who are so much worse off than ourselves. And it's particularly laudable that the UK is the largest economy – the only G8 government – to hold firm to the commitment to spend 0.7% of GDP on development.

This isn't just the right thing to do, driven by some unrealistic bleeding-heart agenda, but – if done properly and strategically – it's also the smart thing to do. It's in our self-interest. But I worry. With each new priority we seem to leave former gains unfinished. That does not make sense. Development means being there for the long run, to see things through, to get the job done.

So let's talk about Aids – an issue I've been deeply involved with for the past 20 years. Eight years ago – when the UK last hosted those powerful leaders – Aids was a big story. The G8 pledged to get close to "the goal of universal access to comprehensive prevention programmes, treatment, care and support by 2010". This was a massive game-changer. The former UN secretary general Kofi Annan credits that G8 with getting 5.4 million people on antiviral treatments, with most of the drugs paid for by the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The results of that G8 can be counted in lives saved, health services revitalised, hope re-born. Around the world, governments that were struggling had new evidence that donors were sincere, and would help them meet their people's needs.

And science has amplified that success. The last couple of years brought proof that when people with HIV take antiviral drugs to stay healthy, their risk of passing on the virus drops dramatically. This is another game-changer. Scientists have also now shown that we can interrupt HIV transmission by understanding the places and people most at risk. Public health experts can target new interventions precisely and effectively.

The Global Fund and UNAIDS have calculated that $15bn (£9.6bn) over the next three years could turn the tide of history. It might sound a lot, but what it would achieve is staggering. In three short years a total of 18 million people could be on life-saving drugs – that also slow the rate of HIV being passed on. This investment would turn the curve of the epidemic. And it's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

The new head of the Global Fund, Mark Dybul, is urging donors to invest in the right places, at the right time, in the right way. Putting more money into the Global Fund now is not just pouring more money into an ever-increasing pot – it's about growing the impact of the investments that have already happened, so we don't have to invest so much in 10 years' time.

This is extraordinary, history-worthy stuff. We can neutralise perhaps the most deadly infectious disease in history in our lifetime.

The window is just as critical with other diseases covered by the Global Fund. There has been a massive scale-up of effort with malaria, and death rates are falling in many places. Yet we know that if you pull back from distributing bed nets, within one rainy season rates will increase rapidly. As Dybul puts it: "If we slow malaria programmes now, we will lose 10 years' investments in one generation." Similarly, with current efforts we will end TB in 2200. But if we combine our efforts on TB and HIV, we can control it within a decade. Globally, HIV is the leading cause of death among women and girls of reproductive age. Britain's international development secretary, Justine Greening, has said that women and girls are top of her priority list. One simple way to turn that priority into action is to invest more in the Global Fund.

At my foundation we look at three critical measures of success: the number of people we've helped protect from HIV infection or from dying of Aids; the cost of this; and the sustainability of the programmes we've supported. Our feeling is that unless you can measure the value, and it continues to do the job after you've gone, we haven't done well enough. Development aid should do at least this. You don't abandon the investment as efficiencies start to kick in with better value for money, you don't give up just when the science proves you can sustain it, and you don't reduce your contribution when you know you can leverage more than double your share.

The UK has always been a leader on development – a show of commitment from the UK will pull others along too. Every £100 the UK gives to the Global Fund now unlocks an extra £50 from the US. President Obama has asked the US congress to give $1.65bn to the Global Fund next year, with a total of $5bn over the next three years. The US is the biggest donor to the Global Fund, and has a rule saying it will never provide more than a third of the funds. That big ambition sets a clear challenge to other governments, foundations and companies.

The UK can make sure the Global Fund has enough money to turn the tide of history. Now is the moment to put serious money behind that hope: doubling its last contribution, putting in £1bn over the next 3 years, will boost the Global Fund's ability to achieve its goals and persuade others to do the right thing too. By capitalising on a historic opportunity now, Aids won't need to be on the table when the UK chairs the G8 in 2021.

Source: Guardian UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 923 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 62  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group