TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:20 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 138 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 5:09 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8098
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Turkish child marriage film shines light on hidden abuses
By Zoe Tabary
15 October 2016

LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Child brides in Turkey are often raped, beaten and forced to undergo virginity tests, according to the director of a new documentary which aims to break the silence on the taboo issue.

"Growing Up Married", which will premiere in London on Oct. 30, examines the impact of child marriage on four women who were wed as teenagers in western Turkey. "When hearing some of their stories I thought to myself 'how are you still alive?'," filmmaker Eylem Atakav said in an interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Globally, one third of girls in developing countries, excluding China, are married before the age of 18 and one in nine before the age of 15, according to U.N. data. Child marriage robs girls of their childhood and education and increases the risk of domestic violence and sexual abuse, campaigners say. It also puts them in danger of death or serious injury if they have children before their bodies are ready. "There are lots of stories about child brides, but very few that look at what happens to them after," said Atakav, a lecturer in film and television studies at the University of East Anglia in Britain.

The Turkish-born director said her filming trip to Izmir in July revealed survivors felt an urgent need to speak out. "I had spent the day interviewing two of my parents' neighbors about their experiences," she recalled. "Then there was a knock on the door – three women from the neighborhood came to ask if I was making a film about child brides and said that they wanted to talk about their experiences too."

The women in the film, now in their 30s to 50s, were married between the ages of 14 and 17. "They put a wedding gown on me one night and took me to some place I had never seen before - I (have) remained silent ever since," one of the women says in the film.

Another describes how she used to dread night-time because her husband would drag her to the bedroom where he "took pleasure out of pulling my hair". "I used to collect all my hair from the floor and pillows every morning. Then I started cutting my hair so that he couldn't hurt me as much."

Atakav said the film also revealed more "insidious" forms of abuse. "Tradition in Turkey dictates that the bride should be a virgin, before she has sex with her husband on the night of the wedding," she explained. "Family members wait outside the bedroom to then note the blood on the white sheet in the morning."

Atakav said that one of the women in the film who was married at 15 was accused of not being a virgin when her family couldn't see any blood. "Her husband shouted at the family 'you bought me a woman, not a girl!'." The woman said she was taken to another village for a virginity test and that "life after that was awful".

Only one of the four women in the film is still married to her husband, said Atakav. Two are divorced and one has remarried but her former husband has banned her from seeing her daughter. "These women have somehow managed to go on with their lives but you can see the pain on their faces," Atakav said.

Campaign group Girls Not Brides says Turkey has one of the highest rates of child marriage in Europe, with an estimated 15 percent of girls married before the age of 18. The minimum age of marriage in Turkey is 17 years, although marriage at 16 can be allowed with court approval.

Atakav hopes her documentary will raise awareness of "this invisible issue, and be a tool for women's voices to be heard everywhere". "What I'd really like is to go show the film in Turkey," she said. "Only privileged families, if anyone, have access to these types of films when those who most need (to see) them don't."

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 5:52 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8098
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Russia set to move closer to decriminalize domestic violence
By NATALIYA VASILYEVA
22 January 2017

MOSCOW (AP) -- In Russia, giving one's spouse a slap is nothing extraordinary for many people. This week, the Russian parliament is expected to take a step closer toward decriminalizing it altogether.

Battery is a criminal offense in Russia, but nearly 20 percent of Russians openly say they think it is sometimes OK to hit a spouse or a child. In a bid to accommodate conservative voters, deputies in the lower house of parliament have given initial approval to a bill eliminating criminal liability for domestic violence that stops short of serious bodily harm or rape.

If the measure passes its second reading in the Duma on Wednesday, when the draft can be changed, approval in the third and final reading would be a foregone conclusion. From the Duma, it would proceed to the upper house, largely a rubber-stamp body, and then to President Vladimir Putin's desk.

Data on domestic violence in Russia are obscure, but Interior Ministry statistics show that 40 percent of all violent crimes in Russia are committed in family surroundings. In 2013, more than 9,000 women were reported to have been killed in incidents of domestic violence.

The bill stems from a Supreme Court ruling last summer to decriminalize battery that doesn't inflict bodily harm, but to retain criminal charges for those accused of battery against family members. Conservative activists objected, saying the ruling meant a parent spanking a child could be punished more harshly than a non-relative striking the child.

Ultra-conservative lawmaker Yelena Mizulina, who also authored Russia's "gay propaganda" ban, then introduced the bill to decriminalize domestic violence. It initially was shelved after a disapproving review from the government. Tables turned at the end of the year when a journalist from a conservative publication pressed Putin about it at his annual news conference.

"If the father spanks his child for a good reason as a means of education, a traditional Russian one, he will be sentenced to two years in prison - and if a neighbor does this, he will get away with a fine!" the journalist told Putin. Putin replied that "it's better not to spank children and refer to some traditions," but then said, "We should not go overboard with it (punishment for battery). It's not good, it harms families."

The bill would make battery on a family member punishable by a fine of less than 30,000 rubles ($500) or a 15-day arrest.

The Moscow-based Anna Center foundation, which runs Russia's only domestic violence hotline, received more than 5,000 calls last year. The foundation says many more calls that go unanswered since the line operates only between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. The Duma bill "is not going to improve the situation to say the least," said Irina Matvienko, who runs the hotline. "Domestic violence is a system which makes it difficult for a woman to seek help," she said. "It's not a traditional value. It's a crime. "

Calls to the Anna Center hotline show that a lot of Russian women initially don't even realize that domestic violence is an offense, Matvienko says. A survey this month by state-run pollster VTsIOM showed that 19 percent of Russians say "it can be acceptable" to hit one's wife, husband or child "in certain circumstances." The nationwide poll by phone of 1,800 people was held Jan. 13-15. The survey had a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points.

Russian police are notoriously reluctant to react to domestic violence calls, which many regard as meddling in family affairs. Prosecutors in November began investigating a police officer who took a call from a woman complaining about her boyfriend's aggressive behavior. Instead of offering help, the officer reportedly told the woman that the police would only come if she got killed. Shortly thereafter, the man beat the woman to death, prosecutors say.

Activist Alyona Popova, whose online petition against the bill has attracted more than 180,000 signatures, sees the efforts to decriminalize domestic violence as a continuation of the Kremlin's increasingly aggressive policies after several repressive laws targeting various groups, from foreign-funded NGOs to gay people. "I think it's part of an overall ideology: aggression and violence are on the rise in society in general since war is everywhere and we're surrounded by enemies," Popova said, referring to the state media narrative that portrays Russia as a besieged fortress.

Council of Europe Secretary-General Thorbjorn Jagland earlier this week sent a letter to the speakers of both houses of Russia's parliament, expressing deep concern at the legislation. Duma speaker Vyacheslav Volodin dismissed the letter as an "unacceptable" attempt to influence parliament.

Olga Batalina, one of the bill's co-authors, said in the Duma last week that the penalty for battery should be lenient for acts of violence "committed in an emotional conflict, without malice, without grave consequences." "Battery doesn't even involve grave bodily harm. We're only talking about bruises, scratches, which is bad, too, of course," Batalina said.

The comment rattled some lawmakers. "Has anyone tried going around with a bruise for a week?" deputy Oleg Nilov asked Batalina at the hearing. "Does anyone think it's OK?"

There haven't been any significant protests against the bill so far. Activist Popova is not surprised: discussing domestic violence still is taboo in Russia. "Society is judgmental," she said. "It goes like this: you're a bad woman if you allow this to happen to you, or you're airing dirty laundry and you're to blame, or it's he beats you it means he loves you. And a lot of people don't want to go public about it."

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 8:20 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8098
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Outrage after Portugal court quotes Bible on woman's assault
By BARRY HATTON
24 October 2017

LISBON, Portugal (AP) -- Women's rights groups in Portugal have reacted angrily to a court decision that quoted the Bible and a 19th-century law in justifying a suspended sentence for a man convicted of assaulting his ex-wife with a bat because she allegedly committed adultery.

The man was given a 15-month suspended sentence and a fine of 1,750 euros ($2,000) for using a bat spiked with nails to assault the woman in the street in 2015, leaving her covered in cuts and bruises. The prosecutor had argued the sentence was too lenient and asked an appeals court for prison time of 3 years and 6 months. But the appeal judges on Oct. 11 rejected his request.

In their written ruling, the judges expressed "some understanding" for the attacker, saying a woman's adultery is "a very serious offense against a man's honor and dignity." They noted the Bible says an adulterous woman should be punished by death and also cited a 1886 Portuguese law that gave only symbolic sentences to men who killed their wives for suspected adultery.

The judges at the appeals court in Porto, Portugal's second-largest city, wrote that they were making reference to the Bible and an old law "to stress that a woman's adultery amounts to conduct which society has always condemned and condemned very strongly."

The written ruling became public this week and sparked outrage on Portuguese social media, with numerous rights groups speaking out. One of them, the Women's Alternative and Response Union, described the ruling as "inadmissible" because it legitimized violence against women and blamed the victim. It said the separation of powers in Portugal means there is no place for the Bible in courtrooms. The group planned street protests for Friday.

Portugal's Superior Magistrates Council, an oversight body, said it had taken note of the "vivid criticism from broad sections of public opinion." However, it said courts are independent and it could not intervene, even when faced with "archaic, inappropriate or unfortunate" comments by judges. The woman could appeal to Portugal's higher courts.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 138 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group