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PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 2:45 pm 
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Hundreds of sex toys dangling from power lines in Portland, Oregon
By Courtney Sherwood
13 July 2015

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A pair of sex toys hang over power lines above a residential street in Portland, Oregon July 13, 2015.
Reuters/Courtney Sherwood

PORTLAND, Ore. (Reuters) - Hundreds of phallic sex toys have been seen hanging in recent days from power lines across Portland, Oregon, provoking laughter, blushing and lots of photos.

The large white and bright orange dildos appear to have been strung together in pairs, and have prompted numerous reports to the Portland Office of Neighborhood Involvement, department spokeswoman Lisa Leddy said on Monday. A spokesman for public utility Portland General Electric said he did not believe the rubber products posed a fire hazard.

In online forums, Portlanders posted photos of dildos swaying in the wind above a number of major commercial streets, and speculated about their origins. Portland resident Lucila Cejas Epple said she first encountered the phalluses at a neighborhood street fair over the weekend. "You could spot them in several intersections and you could see all sorts of reactions to them," she said. "Some would blush, others would laugh, and most would take photos."

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(Reporting by Courtney Sherwood; Editing by Eric M. Johnson and Peter Cooney)
Source: Reuters.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2015 4:34 am 
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Someone’s invented a dildo selfie stick
by Thomas Gorton
6 October 2015

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Screen Shot 2015-10-06 at 10.29.36

Some things are just inevitable – like death, or the continuing success of The Fast and Furious franchise.

Another thing that was bound to happen was the "dildo selfie stick", a rancid morph of two extremely popular objects, found by Pedestrian. What this means is that all those selfies that you (probably haven’t) been taking - the ones at the point of climax – just got a whole lot easier.

This is a variation on an already existing product - the "sex selfie stick", a vibrator that allows you to film the inside of your body while you masturbate and allows an interior, up and close and extremely personal view of an orgasm. The dildo selfie stick is easier to understand; I don’t know about you but I have absolutely zero interest in someone FaceTiming me what looks like panicked keyhole surgery going wrong.

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So how did they invent this crucial piece of kit? I don’t want to take away any business from the (quite possibly fictional) business that has invented these, but I’d wager that dildo selfies sticks are pretty easy to DIY. Still, it appears to be going down well with the consumer market – the two user comments on the promo video are a smiley face emoticon and "this is literally invention of the year".

Given that selfies are causing more and more deaths as time goes by, please be careful if you ever use one. You could actually perish of embarrassment if someone walks in while you’re orgasming and using a selfie stick.

Source: Dazed Digital.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 2:10 pm 
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Sex, love and robots: is this the end of intimacy?
by Eva Wiseman
Sunday, 13 December 2015

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Box fresh: a warm-to-the-touch RealDoll in the San Diego factory, ready for shipment to a client. The dolls cost from $5,000. Photograph: Jonathan Becker/Contour by Getty Images

The world is ending.

The sports fields are empty, the science labs closed. No babies have been born for years. Cut to a split screen of human and robots kissing passionately. “They’re trapped!” says the narrator, voice like gravel. “Trapped in a soft, vice-like grip of robot lips.” Words slam against the screen, a warning. “Don’t. Date. Robots.”

Except Futurama’s 2001 episode “I Dated a Robot”, with its post-apocalyptic world of silvers and blues, wildly overestimated how long it would take before this fear became flesh. It’s November 2015, and in Malaysia, where humidity is at 89% and it is almost certainly still raining, David Levy, a founder of the second annual Congress on Love and Sex with Robots, is free to talk on the phone – he is less busy than planned. “I never expected to end up here,” he says. I hear a shrug.

The Congress on Love and Sex with Robots was meant to begin on 16 November, but was deemed illegal days after Levy arrived from London. “There’s nothing scientific about sex and robots,” inspector-general of police Khalid Abu Bakar told a press conference, explaining why. “It is an offence to have anal sex in Malaysia [let alone sex with robots].”

“I think they thought people would be having sex with robots or some strange thing like that,” Levy’s co-founder Adrian David Cheok said afterwards, explaining that they had planned a series of academic talks about humanoid robotics. But some strange thing like that, some strange thing like a human having sex with a robot, is what Levy, Cheok and others are predicting is almost our reality. They have seen the future of sex, they say, and it is teledildonic.

Teledildonic. The word rolls around the mouth like a Werther’s Original. While there are a variety of romantic tech-sex developments appearing weekly – from the ocean of Oculus Rift possibilities to an invisible boyfriend who lives on your phone, each new development rich as a Miranda July story but as doom-laden as one of Margaret Atwood’s – it’s teledildonics that are exciting not just the porn industry, but scientists too. Long hyped as the new wave in erotic technology, these are smart sex toys connected to the internet. And while they started life as vibrators that could be operated remotely, today the term has expanded to loosely include the new generation of robotic sex dolls.

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Cultural analyst Sherry Turkle warns we’re rapidly approaching a point where: “We may actually prefer the kinship of machines to relationships with real people and animals.” Certainly we have long had a fascination with these half-women, from The Bionic Woman in the 1970s to Her in 2013, where Joaquin Phoenix fell in love with his computer’s operating system. This year, Ex Machina’s Ava seduced, killed and killed again. In 2007 Ryan Gosling starred opposite a “RealDoll”, Bianca, in the indie romance Lars and the Real Girl. The film ends with him gently drowning her in a lake.

A recent study by Stanford University says people may experience feelings of intimacy towards technology because “our brains aren’t necessarily hardwired for life in the 21st century”. Hence, perhaps, the speed at which relationships with robots are becoming a reality.

Today the RealDoll team, infamous now for its lifelike sex dolls (of which they claim to have sold more than 5,000), is extending its range to develop an artificial intelligence system capable both of following commands and talking back to its user. A Realbotix head (reports the New York Times) which can be attached to the existing RealDoll body will cost around $10,000, and will be available in 2017. In a piece entitled “Is This the Dawn of the Sexbots?”, the company’s owner David Mills explained the appeal of these warm-to- the-touch dolls, telling Vanity Fair he loves women but “doesn’t really like to be around people”.

“Women have enjoyed sex toys for 50 years,” he said (after introducing his first model, which arrived at his home in what looks like a customised coffin, head not yet attached), “but men are still stigmatised. We have to correct that. I want to be the Rosa Parks of sex dolls. Men are not going to sit in the back of the bus any more.”

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Pinky and perky: an assortment of nipple choices that customers can order from RealDoll. Photograph: Jonathan Becker/Contour by Getty Images

The people leading us into the future of sex had other lives before (RealDoll’s Mills, for instance, is best known for the book Atheist Universe, which Richard Dawkins cites as “admirable work”). David Levy is a British international master of chess. With his white hair and a sharp eyebrow, he has the look of a cynical Einstein. It was chess that led Levy to computing, consulting in the late 1970s on the development of a chess module for home computers. In 1997, and again in 2009, he won the coveted Loebner prize, which awards the programme that is best able to simulate human communication.

“What do you do when you’re not doing the Loebner prize?” asked Judge 3 to Levy’s chatbot, Do-Much-More (the offspring of his first winner Do-A-Lot). “Oh, I do much more than I intended to do at first. I got more interested in the job as I went along.” Judge 3: “Is that difficult?” Do-Much-More: “No, it isn’t at all difficult. It is as peaceful as a platypus playing with a potato pudding.”

In 2007 Levy published Love and Sex with Robots, a book that one USA Today critic found “troublingly arousing”. Just as same-sex love and marriage have finally been embraced by society, he argued, so will sex with robots. “Love with robots will be as normal as love with other humans,” he wrote. The dream is, as one would expect, utopian. Prostitution will become obsolete. Artificial intelligence will be the answer to many of the world’s problems with intimacy. “The number of sexual acts and lovemaking positions commonly practised between humans will be extended, as robots teach us more than is in all of the world’s published sex manuals combined.”

Levy predicted “a huge demand from people who have a void in their lives because they have no one to love, and no one who loves them. The world will be a much happier place because all those people who are now miserable will suddenly have someone. I think that will be a terrific service to mankind.”

Unless… Unless… One chilly night in February I was chilled further by The Nether by American playwright Jennifer Haley. The story is set in a dystopian future in which people, so disillusioned by real life, decide to abandon it altogether, “crossing over” to spend all their time online in virtual worlds such as The Hideaway. Here, protecting their anonymity by living as avatars, they are able to do whatever they want. They rape children. The online world is sunlit and quaint, with a jolly host called Papa, who, when they enter, offers his guests a little girl. After they’ve had sex with her, they are invited to slay her with an axe. There are “no consequences here”, assures Papa.

And in this play is one of the questions that arises when we stare into the near-future of sex, with its machines and its promises, its employment of the technology used for shoot-’em-up games now reinvented for fucking. Porn actor Ela Darling, when asked by Vice in a discussion about tech and sex: “What would you do if someone fully scanned you and could do whatever they wanted with you?” answered: “That’s probably the future. And that’s OK with me.” Is it a robot’s role to do the things that humans can’t, or won’t? Will they be the solution not just to the problem Levy discusses, of loneliness, but to the problem of people whose desires are illegal? And then what does this mean for the rest of us?

Robots are evolving fast. They were invented in Bristol in 1949 by William Grey Walter, who was investigating how the brain works. It is fitting then, that down a wooded slope on the University of the West of England campus, the Bristol Robotics Laboratory is today considered a world leader in its field. The lab covers an area of 3,500m2, its vast yellow-lit space divided into glass sections littered with hard drives and disembodied prosthetic limbs. In the centre is a house. This is their “assisted living” smart home, where researchers are testing systems that could help people with dementia and limited mobility. By the sofa is a “sociobot” that can respond to facial expressions. The most human-looking of the systems, over by the dining table, is a robot called Molly. She has a tablet in place of a chest, for displaying photographs, and “She’ll say, for instance,” my guide explains: “‘Do you remember Paris?’” In that echoing space I found myself suddenly breathless.

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Face off: Ava in the film Ex Machina. Photograph: Rex

When David Levy was 10 he visited Madame Tussauds waxworks museum with his aunt. “I saw someone,” he said, “and it didn’t dawn on me for a few seconds that that person was a waxwork. It had a profound effect on me – that not everything is as it seems, and that simulations can be very convincing.”

Levy has rarely left the air-conditioned confines of his lab since he arrived in Malaysia. There are no windows. The door leads on to the forecourt of a small shopping mall, and next door, looming yellowly beside the river that marks the border with Singapore, is Legoland. On Google Maps it looks as though a giant child has discarded a toy on her way in for tea. In his lab Levy is working on the new Do-Much-More, a chatbot that, he says, after two weeks is already better than last year’s Loebner winner. “When you have a robot around the home,” he tells me, “whether for cooking or for sex, wouldn’t it be nice to be able to have a chat with it?”

Levy has very little time for jokes. Or, it turns out, for philosophy. “Are humans machines?” I ask him. He tells me he’s learned not to try to answer philosophical questions. Ethics, however, he’s interested in. “People ask: is it cheating? Only if women using vibrators are cheating. Will sex workers be put out of business? It’s possible.” What about bigger issues though – what about sex and empathy? And: can a robot consent? “When AI advances, robots will exhibit empathy. People will feel towards them as they do towards animals.”

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David Levy, founder of Love and Sex with Robots.

He pauses: “Look. One has to accept that sexual mores advance with time, and morality with it. If you had said a hundred years ago that, today, men would marry men and women women, everyone would have laughed. Nothing can be ruled out.” Nothing? “You think that’s scary? Millions of scary things rely on technological advances. Toy drones, for example. That you can buy on the high street and attach anthrax to, and kill hundreds of people. This, this I find frightening.” It took some time (we continued our discussions on email) before Levy was prepared to answer a question about the thing that had been troubling me – if robots are his solution for men who can’t have relationships, does he think they’re also the ethical choice, say, for a man who wants a relationship with a child?

He was reluctant to discuss this, pointing me to a keynote talk he did in Kathmandu called “When Robots do Wrong”. Which was fascinating, but didn’t answer my question. Eventually he responds, his email a sigh. “My own view is that robots will eventually be programmed with some psychoanalytical knowledge so they can attempt to treat paedophiles,” he said. “Of course that won’t work sometimes, but in those cases it would be better for the paedophiles to use robots as their sexual outlets than to use human children.”

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Dr Kathleen Richardson, director of the Campaign Against Sex Robots. Photograph: Dr Kathleen Richardson

However evolved they become, robots will always be distinguishable from humans. They call it the “uncanny valley” – the point at which humans become uneasy at a robot’s humanness. So, even as the technology evolves, scientists will ensure there will always be something. Not a glitch, necessarily, not a ding, but a something. “And because of that, robots will never replace humans. They’ll simply become an extension of our lives.” Levy’s main thesis is that the advent of sex robots will help the lonely. The people who find it impossible to form relationships. “If that were me, I’d rather have sex with a robot,” he says, “than no sex at all.” Robot sex, it’s implied, could save humanity. His wife, he tells me, is sceptical about the idea.

So is ANTHROPOLOGIST Kathleen Richardson. She says: “Levy is wrong.” Richardson is a senior research fellow in the ethics of robotics at De Montfort University and director of the Campaign Against Sex Robots. “David Levy is taking people’s insecurities and offering a solution that doesn’t exist,” she explains. “Paedophiles, rapists, people who can’t make human connections – they need therapy, not dolls.”

She perches on the edge of an armchair and explains the recent history of robots. Over the past 15 years, the purpose of robots developed for domestic use quietly changed. In South Korea they have set a goal for every home in the country to have domestic robots by 2020. But will they really be tools to help around the house, or will their main appeal be as a companion?

“This move,” towards socialised robots, “is happening in hyper-capitalist societies driven by neo-liberal ideas.” Where people, she says, are becoming distant from each other; where in warm living rooms families sit together but apart, each concentrating on individual screens. It’s a direct path, she believes, from the way we communicate through machines, from social networking, to robots. And this, she says, is dangerous.

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Happy to help: Molly the Robot at Bristol Robotic Laboratory. Molly is designed to help elderly or vulnerable people who live alone. Photograph: Antonio Olmos for the Observer

Richardson looks at how we attribute sociability to objects. She showed me a silent animation from 1944, in which two triangles and a circle move around a diagram of a house. To me, it was clear both that this was a tragic love story, and also that I was being moved by anthropomorphised lines. “A robot is not just a developed vibrator,” she laughs, the sort of laugh that does not necessarily follow a joke. As the sex trade with machines grows, and these objects take on increasingly humanoid forms, Richardson will be asking: “What does this mean? And is it harmful?”

As I explore the Bristol Robotics Laboratory, I realise that each glass-partitioned wall surrounds another ethical dilemma. The drones, so helpful when monitoring climate change. Tiny swarming “kilobots”, inspired by ants, modelling future ideas for cancer treatment. The too-realistic human head, with its soft skin and unfinished skull. Here there is a feeling of scholarly possibility, fuelled by earringed men, large coffee cups. In one cubicle, knee-height Nao robots feature in an experiment in which Professor Alan Winfield,part of a British Standards Institute working group on robot ethics, asks: “Can we teach a robot to be good? But when the research goes public and outgrows this hangar-sized lab, each robot will inevitably be reshaped depending on who acquires it.

An apology. I thought this article would be a bit of fun, honestly. A romp through the kinky silliness that’ll be marketed at our grown grandchildren, their poor glazed eyes consensually replaced with tiny computers. A funny toy, a cheeky app maybe. A widower watching TV with his unseeing doll, more of a carer than a wife. And then I went and spoiled it all by asking questions. Assuming technology doesn’t start rolling backwards, people will be having sex with robots in the next five years. Before RealDolls manages to refine and sell its robots, with their lubricated mouths and their custom eye colours, there are entrepreneurs who are competing right now to market their own versions first.

While buyers of Pepper – a robot engineered to be emotionally responsive to humans – have signed user contracts promising they won’t use it for “acts for the purpose of sexual or indecent behaviour”, sex doll company True Companion is developing a robot that will be “always turned on and ready to play”. Roxxxy is due to go on sale later this year – in May they’d had 4,000 pre-orders at £635 each. “She doesn’t vacuum or cook,” says Douglas Hines, Roxxxy’s creator, “but she does almost everything else.”

When I heard about Richardson’s Campaign Against Sex Robots, I sniggered. It conjures up every Giles Coren-esque description of the most furious feminist imaginable, charging into the future with a mallet and a frown. Richardson admits it’s not… unfunny. But then she shrugs. What else is she going to call it?

Richardson and Levy stand on opposite sides of a busy road, watching technology speed past towards a clouded horizon. If the future of sex (as all arrows seem to point) is in robotics, then Richardson is right: it requires a thoughtful discussion about the ethics of gender and sex. But while she identifies the relationships that appear to be emerging as modelled on sex work – the robot as passive, bought, female; the man as emotion-free and sex-starved – surely rather than calling for a ban on them, to forlornly try stalling technology, the pressure should be to change the narrative. To use this new market to explore the questions we have about sex, about intimacy, about gender.

I agree with Kathleen Richardson on many things, especially that robots should not be the prescription for those who struggle with the otherness of people (something she said in the context of relationships with robots – that humans become human through interacting with other humans – I’ve thought about most days since we met). But until the internet becomes the Nether, until it becomes so immersive that our grasp on reality becomes slippery, I think it’s a mistake to fear it, and to fear them. Because this is what we know: the sexbots are coming.

Source: Guardian UK.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:55 pm 
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Lonely pensioners fuel surge in sales of inflatable SEX DOLLS in China as they struggle to find new partners
By Qin Xie
5 December 2015

Hidden amongst the back streets and alleyways of Xi'an, north China, are around 2,000 adult shops.

Perhaps surprisingly, a growing number of their customer base is pensioners looking for blow up sex dolls, reported People's Daily Online. It's a growing trend that's also seen in other parts of the country.

Some of these aging men have been widowed while others have found that their wives are no longer interested in sex. Tragically, some of these men are also seeing these dolls as companions in life as they no longer have regular contact with their children.

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Normal? Li (left) sits at his home in Xi'an, north China, with his blow up sex doll, which he uses as a companion

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Trend: Li is one of a number of pensioners in the city of Xi'an, China, who owns a blow up sex doll (pictured)

According to Feng, an adult shop owner who trades both online and at his numerous outlets in Xi'an, blow up sex dolls didn't arrive in the city until about 1998. At the time, they were lucky to sell 100 a year. But in recent years, a growing number of these dolls are being sold. Feng claims he now sells more than 1,000 of the dolls a year.

Typically, the consumer groups are broken down into curious youths, who buy the dolls online but don't use them much; middle-aged migrant workers or men in long distance relationships, who will use the dolls regularly; and widowers or pensioners living alone, who use the dolls regularly as well. In particular, Feng revealed that the pensioners will generally visit the shop to browse, which in turn allows them to easily return any unwanted products.

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Recommended: Li (pictured) is 70 and lives on his own. He decided to buy the sex doll after talking to a friend

Factoring in other shops, online products and similar sex toys, the sales rate in the city of Xi'an alone is estimated to be more than 10,000 items a year. For the city's pensioners, the toys fill a need. QQ reported that a survey of those aged between 65 and 80 in China showed that 95 per cent still had sexual needs - and many of these were not being met.

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Growing tend: Feng says his adult business has seen the number of sex dolls sold up from 100 to 1,000 a year

For a 70-year-old man named as Li, a blow up doll is both a companion and a sex toy. Li's wife died three years ago and he rarely sees his children - his son works abroad while his daughter lives in another city. Most days, Li is at home on his own. Although he was introduced to a woman once, she didn't want to have sex and thought that Li was disgusting for making the suggestion. Her feelings echoes that of the wider society where many feel that once a person retires, their sex life should retire too. After talking with a friend, who also had a doll, Li decided to buy one for himself for around 1,000 Yuan (£100).

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Two markets: It's not just the men buying the dolls. Sometimes the wives buy the toys for their husbands

Li says he uses it perhaps a handful of times a year but most of the time, it's deflated and sits in a cupboard. Occasionally, however, he puts the doll out and dresses it in his late wife's clothing just to have a cup of tea.

Lonely widowers like Li are not uncommon. Although life expectancy has increased in China, those left behind don't always have the option of pairing up with new partners. As well as difficulty in finding a compatible partner, who is of the right age group, pensioners also have to deal with the objections of their children. This social phenomenon has also led to a growing number of pensions seeks love in the arms of prostitutes and other monetary based relationship.

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Not alone: As well as pensioners, curious youths and migrant workers also buy the dolls, according to Feng

But it's not just lonely widowers who resort to sex dolls. Another man in his sixties, named as Zhang, revealed that it was his wife who bought him the sex doll. He claims that when his wife reached her 50s, she no longer had a need for sex while the opposite was true for him. After repeated arguments over their sex life, his wife bought him a sex doll to appease him. Although initially angry, Zhang used the sex doll once when he was in need. Immediately afterwards, Zhang felt guilt and regret. The next time it happened, Zhang resorted to the toy and, again, he was left with regret. Zhang says that it has been a cycle of regret for him for the past few years.

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Complicated: Pensioners want to find someone compatible but their children have to agree to the union too

But it's not just Xi'an that's seen a growing number of pensioners resorting to blow up sex dolls. Although there are no nationwide sales figures for the toys, there have been a number of media reports regarding the growing trend of pensioners using blow up dolls, albeit, only when things go wrong.

Earlier this year, a man in Zhuzhou, central China, reported a fraud case concerning blow up sex dolls. The 67-year-old brought a doll, which looked nothing like the advert, and reported the incident to the police. Eventually, the case went to the courts but the verdict was never publicly announced.

For the adult shop owner Feng, it's clear why the use of such toys are rarely reported. He said: 'People are repressed about sex. They think sex is ugly and don't want to discuss it. They especially don't want to discuss their own sex life with others.'

Source: Daily Mail UK.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 3:47 pm 
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Makers of 'mindblowing' sex robot with virtual vagina swamped with orders
3 February 2016
By Jasper Hamill

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The manufacturers of a pioneering video game controller that doubles as a virtual reality male sex toy have pulled it off the market after being swamped by demand.

VirtuaDolls is a system which allows hi-tech heavy breathers to strap on a VR helmet, sleep with simulated women and be pleasured by a device which responds to on-screen eroticism. This could, for instance, allow gamers to watch a cyber-siren twerking whilst the silicon sex toy pulsates in time with her every gyration. So many men rushed to pre-order this device on the crowdfunding site Indiegogo that its designers were forced to "put the project on hold".

In a series of tweets, the firm behind Virtuadolls admitted demand for their virtual vagina had been enormous. Designed by the American company Eos, the VirtualDolls device is a "controller" which looks like a creepy silicon simulation of a woman's safe space. It invites "players" to get involved in sex games, where they carry out missions and are rewarded with a ending which is best described as "happy".

VirtuaDolls ships with a title called Girls of Arcadia (pictured below) in which gamers have to save a damsel in distress.

If players can't be bothered rescuing the woman, they can just jump to "sim mode" in which they simply choose a woman and sex begins before the first date is even mooted, let alone completed. Men who save this woman from a minotaur can expect to receive a very enthusiastic thank you

William Spracklin, Eos founder, said the gizmo was an "adult game controller where touch and feedback are taken to the next level". His Indiegogo campaign raised $7,000 out of its $20,000 goal in just five days. In a promotional video backed by Beverly Hills Cop-style synth-pop music, the firm responsible for VirtuaDolls said it would "take adult gaming to the next level". It is designed to have "several innovative features which create a mindblowing experience".

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These include a "programmable pressure gripper", which can vary the tightness of its squeeze and a "stroke motion" with variable speed. It uses sensors to detect the power of a man's thrusts, which can then be used to control the onscreen action. The device can be used along with VR helmets including the Oculus Rift. However, it his promo video, Spracklin hinted that he didn't currently have the right members of staff to "help create an amazing experience", which could be why the product's crowdfunding campaign has been postponed.

On Reddit, one user had the following warning for anyone who was considering buying a VirtuaDoll. "Sometime in the future some teen is going to be using this thing in conjunction with headphones and a VR headset," he predicted. "His mother is going to walk into the room and he's going to have no idea she's even there. She might not interrupt and he might be coming down for dinner none the wiser."

Source: Mirror UK.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 20, 2016 12:14 pm 
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New sex dolls available from China
20 March 2016

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Source: Pure-T.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 11:27 am 
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By Venus O'Hara
27 October 2017

In 2009, I decided to leave my job in luxury property in Barcelona and set up my own sex blog. At the time, I was doing some fetish modelling at weekends, directing my own shoots with a body-positive message. I had accumulated a lot of imagery and wanted to share it with the world, to turn my hobby into an online business.

It wasn’t a decision I took lightly, but it was a bad time to be in real estate. I had a rat infestation in my flat and having to buy rat poison instead of food was torturous. So, when the commission for my final two sales came through, I left my job, got rid of the rats and venusohara.org was born.

I told only a few close friends and family. Most thought I was chasing an impossible dream, making a living from my art, but when it started working, they were pleased for me. My blog grew gradually in the beginning – on a good day, I had 300 visits – so I gradually got used to online attention. It was when I started getting interviewed in the Spanish media that it exploded. And then I was asked to become a sex columnist for Spanish GQ.

By 2013, I was hailed as Spain’s most influential sex blogger, and adult novelty companies started sending me sex toys to include in my column. So I put my growing pleasure stash to good use and made a business out of it. My first review was a jelly vibrator – I wouldn’t review it now, because I know jelly is too porous to be cleaned properly.

I now produce video reviews for my Sex Toy Laboratory on YouTube, and also work in the development side of the industry; I have even designed my own clitoral stimulator. Lying on my unmade bed and having orgasms is an obvious perk of the job, but it’s only a very small part of the process. Most of it is writing reviews, then recording and editing videos. I’m a one-woman orchestra and work almost every day, but I love what I do.

I want to raise orgasmic awareness among women. It seems that despite progress in female sexual liberation, many women still don’t realise that having a clitoris means we have more orgasmic potential. Apart from the obvious sexual benefits, being able to pleasure yourself can have a positive effect on other aspects of your life, especially your relationships and body confidence. Orgasm can be a great insomnia cure and muscle relaxant, and it can boost your mood.

When you work online, you can never really know the true extent of your influence. It’s only when I meet my female followers at book signings that I realise my work is having an effect. I’ve met several women who have been inspired to buy their first sex toy after reading one of my reviews. The glow on their faces when they tell me about their first orgasm encourages me to work harder.

I’ve only ever bought one sex toy – my first – a battery-operated rabbit vibrator, but I have acquired hundreds of pleasure devices that have been sent to me. I only test luxury products made from body-safe materials. I keep them all in a big cupboard and store them according to their category: so, there’s the ben-wah balls drawer, the rabbit drawer… You can even buy app-controlled toys that can be controlled by a partner on the other side of the world. The most expensive toy I’ve reviewed was a laser device to facilitate female arousal. It cost €1,700 and all I can say is it was like female Viagra. The best toys are in the “repeat” drawer, which is next to my bed. One day, I hope I can exhibit them all.

Explaining what I do for a living is never dull. Some men find it intimidating, others intriguing. It’s a good filter to see who can truly handle me. It can be annoying if people don’t take me seriously or laugh as though it’s frivolous or scandalous. More often, it encourages people to tell me things they wouldn’t dare admit to their partners or friends. When this happens, I know my job is fulfilling a genuine need.

Many women ask me, “How can I have an orgasm?” It really isn’t about the toy; it’s more about letting go and connecting your erotic imagination to your body. When you finally do, there really is nothing quite like it.

Source: Guardian UK

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 3:27 pm 
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Viagra to be sold without prescription in Britain
29 November 2017

LONDON (AFP) - Britain is to become the first country in the world where the erectile disfunction drug Viagra can be bought without the need for a doctor's prescription from 2018, its maker Pfizer said.

The US pharmaceutical giant made the announcement late on Tuesday, saying it had received authorisation from the British regulator following a public consultation. The hope is that men who have not previously sought help will now be more likely to do so, although men with heart problems or taking "interfering medicines" will still need a prescription to purchase Viagra.

Officials also hope that the decision will avoid purchases of Viagra on websites operating illegally. "This decision is good news for men's health," said Mick Foy, group manager in vigilance and risk management of medicines at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. "The move to make Viagra Connect more widely accessible will encourage men to seek help within the healthcare system and increase awareness of erectile dysfunction," he said.

Berkeley Phillips, UK medical director at Pfizer, said: "We understand some men may avoid seeking support and treatment for this condition, so we believe giving them the option to talk to a pharmacist and buy Viagra Connect could be a real step forward."

Source: AFP

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