TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 6:20 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 113 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Would you mind if your partner is/was bi?
No 63%  63%  [ 5 ]
Yes 38%  38%  [ 3 ]
No, if it was in the past, or I'm still Number One 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Don't care/no opinion 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 8
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2015 7:17 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
‘Just a phase’? This is why we need to talk about biphobia
By Francesca Kentish
12 August 2015

Image
(Picture: Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

Unless you’ve been in hiding for the past 40 years, chances are you know what homophobia means.

The same can’t be said for biphobia. Simply put, biphobia is when people are prejudiced towards bisexuals. It’s pretty similar to homophobia, except people often aren’t aware it’s happening. Bisexuals often face added discrimination from people within the LGBT community as well as discrimination from heterosexual people. Chances are you will have seen biphobia on TV or heard someone make a biphobic comment without even realising it.

Ever heard someone jokingly say bisexuals are greedy? That’s biphobia. Or that bisexuals should make up their minds? Biphobia strikes again.

A prime example of biphobia is the now famous Vogue interview with Cara Delevingne where the interviewer Rob Haskell wrote: ‘Her parents seem to think girls are just a phase for Cara, and they may be correct.’ Perhaps one of the most patronising phrases a bisexual will ever hear is ‘just a phase.’ Those three little words have huge power. They place doubt over that person’s sexuality. They treat that person as a child who can’t possibly know who they are attracted to and they put that person’s entire identity into question.

Yes, it’s true that for some bisexuality is a phase, an exploration of their sexuality, or a security blanket for some lesbians and gay men as they start to come out of the closet. But to suggest that every bisexual is just in a phase is ridiculous and completely undermines thousands of people’s sense of identity – at a great cost.

Dr Siri Harrison, a clinical psychologist, said: ‘When people feel entitled to degrade or dismiss an aspect of someone, that person feels shame.’ Dr Harrison says she sees this shame manifested into low self esteem, anxiety and depression in some of her bisexual clients at her London practice.

A huge problem is that bisexuals don’t just face this dismissive attitude from straight people, it comes from within the LGBT community too, who sometimes forgets that the B stands for bisexual and is there for a reason. This attitude is perfectly illustrated in The L Word, the TV show that put LGBT relationships at the forefront of popular culture for the one of the first times back in 2004. In this scene Dana (lesbian) asks Alice (bisexual) to make up her mind about her sexuality:

    Dana: Christ, Alice, when are you going to make up your mind between dick and pussy? And spare us the gory bisexual details, please.
    Alice: Well, for your information, Dana, I’m looking for the same qualities in a man that I am in a woman.

While Alice in the show has a quick comeback and appears confident with her identity, not everyone is so self assured in the real world. Even people who feel entirely comfortable in their skin would find it difficult to live with a continuous onslaught from friend and foe, gay and straight, demanding you to pick a side and be someone you’re not.

Priya Francome-Wood, a masters student in Brighton, has found this demand to choose a preference difficult. Francome-Wood told Metro.co.uk: ‘I get a lot of “you just haven’t made up your mind yet” or “so are you gay or straight?”’ She added: ‘Personally, I have found myself saying I am either a lesbian or straight in many, many situation as, from my experience, it is much more accepted (by both gay and straight communities) to be one or the other but not bi.’ For many it is easier to show only one part of their sexuality than to live with the consequences of showing their whole selves. Francome-Wood remembers one particularly offensive comment said to her in reference to her being bi: ‘One [comment] that particularly stung was at Pride, being told that I wasn’t to celebrate as much as everyone else because it was only half my day.’

Dr Harrison explained the psychology behind why some people find it so hard to accept bisexuality: ‘The human brain wants to categorise people and concepts neatly away, and socially we like to fully understand, without thinking too hard, in black and white.’ She continued: ‘When we can’t comprehend things easily it becomes a grey area not easily categorised. People don’t like to sit with their own discomfort so push it back on the person it comes from.’

Simply put, people are more ready to accept a person as homosexual as it fits neatly into a binary of straight and gay, but bisexuality is harder to define. Many bisexuals find their attraction to men and women is quite fluid and changes over time. Some people struggle with not being able to categorise that person and so deflect their own discomfort on to them.

This is where negative stereotypes of bisexuals as greedy and promiscuous come from. These are not just joking terms – they can have a real effect on the person they are aimed at, as The Bisexuality Report found. The Open University and BiUK looked at national and international data, talked with therapists and bisexuals to form The Bisexuality Report. The findings were alarming:

    Of all the larger sexual identity groups, bisexual people have the worst mental health problems, including high rates of depression, anxiety, self harm and suicidality. This has been found both internationally and in the UK specifically, and has been strongly linked to experiences of biphobia and bisexual invisibility.

Jokes about being ‘greedy’ don’t seem quite so funny when it’s been shown that bisexual men are 6.3 times more likely, and bisexual women 5.9 times more likely to commit suicide than heterosexual people. It also impacts on physical health because some bisexuals are not getting appropriate health care and sex education because they are too scared to tell their health practitioner about their sexual identity. And some practitioners treat bisexuals as gay, not giving important advice on birth control and family planning.

Dr Harrison says: ‘Bisexuality is not pathologically or psychologically a problem as an orientation, but the prejudice directed at it from other people can manifest as one.’ However, there is good news: popular culture is starting to include more positive portrayals of bisexual characters, like Torchwood’s Captain Jack Harkness. And The Bisexuality Report found: ‘Bisexual people reported that they felt freedom from the social binaries of gay/straight and male/female. This meant that they thought that they were more able than others to develop identities which felt right for them, and to form relationships without restrictions around who they could be attracted to.’

Many linked this to a sense of independence, self-awareness and authenticity. Biphobia needs to be recognised in the same way as homophobia and only with continued cultural awareness will we see a change in those alarming health statistics.

Source: Metro uK

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:07 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Sexual orientation in the UK: Half of young people say they are not 100% heterosexual
By Fiona Keating
16 August 2015

Image
People taking part in the annual Pride in London Parade on 27 June. (Rob Stothard/Getty Images)

According to a new YouGov survey, 49% of 18-24 year-olds in Britain define themselves as something other than completely heterosexual. The Kinsey scale invented in the 1940s placed people on a range of sexual preferences from exclusively heterosexual at 0 to exclusively homosexual at 6.

In the YouGov study, individuals were asked to put themselves on that sexuality scale. In total, 72% of the British public scored themselves at the completely heterosexual end of the scale, while 4% were at the completely homosexual end, with 19% stating they were somewhere in between – classed as bisexual by Kinsey.

One of the most striking findings of the new study is that with each generation, people see their sexuality as less fixed and more fluid. The results for 18-24 year-olds are particularly telling, with 43% placing themselves in the non-binary area between 1 and 5 and 52% place themselves at one end or the other. Of these, only 46% say they are completely heterosexual and 6% as completely homosexual.

Public opinion seems to accept the concept that sexual orientation exists along a continuum, rather than being a either/or choice between being straight and gay. According to YouGov, 60% of heterosexuals support this idea, as do 73% of homosexuals.

Image

Only 28% of heterosexuals believe that "there is no middle ground – you are either heterosexual or you are not".

Kinsey estimated that around 10% of the population was gay, although this percentage was criticised by the American Statistical Association. However, a 2011 Gallup poll asked over 1,000 people in the US "what percentage of Americans today would you say are gay or lesbian?" On average, respondents guessed that 1-in-4 Americans were.

When it comes to breaking down in terms of gay men and women 1.5% of men in the UK say they're gay and only 0.7% of women say the same. But in terms of bisexuality, 0.3% of men select this, compared to 0.5% of women. Slightly more women than men say "don't know" or refuse to answer the question – 3.8% compared to 3.5% of men.

Image

According to research by Biscuit, a website for bisexual women, 38% of respondents have at one point engaged in some form of sexual activity with a same-sex partner, often as part of a group.

Charlotte Dingle, editor-in-chief of Biscuit, told Pink News: "Women are increasingly viewing their own sexuality as fluid. I believe that the old definitions of 'gay', 'straight' and 'bi' are increasingly irrelevant in a society in which an individual's sexual and gender identity is becoming more and more complex and diverse."

Source: International Business Times

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2015 7:39 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Society’s Bisexual Hangups: How Chasing Amy Is Still Ahead of Its Time
by Vrai Kaiser
Sunday, August 2nd 2015

Image

Bisexuals!

In a nation that’s still struggling to wrap its societal head around the concept that maybe not everybody’s cisgender and straight and that also those people are real human beings, nothing is scarier than someone not fitting within the shakily established new binary (from “normal” and “freak” to “totes straight” and “the gayest”).

As my extremely nervous and closeted high school self felt safe joking, bisexuals do the great service of giving homo and heterosexuals someone to bond over hating (and let us not get into pansexuals or the ace spectrum, individuals so invisible the illuminati take lessons from them).

Whether you view it as a phase, a way of continuing to “pass” in straight society, a sexy fanservice opportunity that can still be hooked up with a heterosexual love interest in the end, a lascivious villain out to draw every wide eyed or stalwart innocent into their life of depravity, or just referring to them as solely gay or straight depending on their partner at the time, there are a whole host of exciting ways to ignore and trivialize non-monosexual people.

That rather weary opener brings us to 1997’s Chasing Amy, Kevin Smith’s finest film and still one of the all-time indie greats. No doubt those familiar with the canon of queer film are raising some significant eyebrows at me right now, because advertising at time of release pretty well pigeonholed this flick as “that one movie where Ben Affleck “turns” a lesbian.” Not so, my friends! In fact, it’s one of the most sensitive exploration of the grey areas of romantic and sexual desire I can think of.

Image

A quick summary: Holden works with his friend Banky on a popular comic called Bluntman and Chronic. At a convention, he meets Alyssa Jones, a much smaller indie comic and lesbian, and befriends her before ultimately falling her. The two eventually begin a relationship; but while Alyssa is prepared to face being shunned by her community for her new partner, Holden finds himself gripped with a mounting jealousy when he learns that he isn’t Alyssa’s first male partner.

Before we start, I do want to mention that I can think of many reasons why a queer person might not want to engage with this film: the stereotype that lesbians “just need the right man” has been a pervasive and dangerous one throughout American history, one that often leads to horrifying abuse and assault on queer women in an attempt to “fix” them. To see the idea of “turning” being considered in even a semi-comedic film and by a straight male director no doubt is an absolute horror on principle for those who have suffered or known someone who has. I don’t, can’t begrudge that stance for even a second.

Setting that aside, I’m convinced Chasing Amy is the best version of itself it could possibly be. Smith’s always leaned toward including homoeroticism in his films (usually via the closeted Jay) because of his close relationship with his happily out brother; additionally, Smith went over the film’s script with friends and lesbian filmmakers Guinevere Turner and Rose Troche to make sure he was being true to the queer experience of the time (or at least not offensively off the mark); and finally, the script itself doesn’t claim to speak for Alyssa’s experience but instead frames itself around Holden’s ignorance and insecurities as a straight man (and the harm that they do).

Holden’s issues are familiar ones for those familiar with the meeting point of straight and queer culture. He’s not quite a “nice guy,” but he gets to be the sort of Ideal Dude in the early parts of the film. His insensitivity is born of ignorance, and once he befriends Alyssa he starts thinking about lesbians as (gasp) people over stereotypes and calling Banky out for his casual use of slurs. But his character arc doesn’t get to rest there – that would be far too easy, a nice fantasy that pats the “understanding” straight person on the back and then rewards them with their unattainable romantic partner.

Once Holden and Alyssa actually start dating, the film isn’t shy about bringing out his more entrenched, less easily defined prejudices and insecurities, particularly once he learns that Alyssa has had male as well as female partners. There’s an undercurrent of sexism to it (that Alyssa herself calls out), that he’s “conquered” this person by being the first male partner (and thus the first experience of, on some level, “real” sex that she’s had). His increased jealousy is a common mentality too – it’s a widely held urban legend that bisexual people are too sexual for a monogamous relationship, that it’s only a matter of time until they cheat or run off with a partner of a different gender. Preposterous fear-mongering, but pervasive nonetheless.

What might be most unique about the film is that it doesn’t shy away from depicting how this prejudice cuts both ways. The “pronoun game” scene is downright brutal, with all of Alyssa’s friends treating her like she’s died once she announces that she’s seeing Holden. There’s a real concept of “betrayal” to it, a reminder that the gay community was well into forming its own qualifications for what constituted being an acceptable member. When Alyssa clings most fiercely to her identification as a gay woman (which is perfectly valid! But not as set in stone as the political movement of “born this way” shaped it), it’s not hard to get the sense that it’s partly because that’s what the narrative dictates (though bless the film for the very necessary step of making sure its ending beat drives home that Alyssa was never “cured” of anything).

Image

This is by no means an uncommon thing. It is, in fact, quite common for bisexuals (pan/ace/etc, but we’re going to use bi for ease of reference) to feel pressured to identify as the sexuality of their partner. This is especially true for bisexual men, who are looked at with mistrust by gay partners and as walking HIV threats by straight partners. As understanding of sexuality and new generations have come about this has also led to something of a stratification of “real” vs. “trendy” queer people (even in that good old bastion of queerness, Tumblr).

Grey areas of sexuality get nudged under the rug because the community has had to fight so hard to drag itself out from under the religious right’s “This is a sinful choice” accusation, and the idea that there are people who aren’t hard wired on either side of the binary wasn’t a subtlety that made for a convincing unified front (there is a similar battle currently occurring with trans individuals, crafting a narrative that doesn’t leave a whole lot of room for people who can’t or don’t want to transition, or find themselves between or outside the traditional settings of the gender binary). Coming out as bisexual became an opportunity for homophobic voices to misread those people as evidence that gay people can be “fixed” to prefer heterosexual relationships, and the undercurrent of resentment for that seems to remain still (along with a fondness for tossing the “weird” outliers or more visibly queer individuals under the bus in the name of looking respectable). Issues like these are delicate and complex, and the nuanced discussions between members of the queer community get pushed aside and too often forgotten in the name of trying to protect the community as a whole from subjugation.

Take, for example, the “born this way” narrative: often troublesome for queer individuals who aren’t sure of themselves from a very early age or who change along with various stages of their life, it can become an absolutist stance that can cause stratification within the community of “gold star”/”real” gay people and everyone else; simultaneously, “born this way” can still be crucial in protecting young individuals who might face violence or “corrective therapy” from a toxic home situation (take the tragic death of Leelah Alcorn – there was no shortage of people aware enough to say that she should’ve been protected and validated in her identity, while at the same time an enormous part of her desperation was the false and dangerous belief that being a “real” trans person can only be achieved by surgically transitioning and doing so at a young age).

Pop culture as a whole doesn’t leave much room for this lost group on either side, by the way. Take your pick: Katy Perry’s “I Kissed a Girl” on one side, that classic anthem of “isn’t it daring and naughty that I’m making out with this unsuspecting girl don’t worry I like dick though did I mention the boyfriend I totally have” (at least when Cobra Starship did the parody version they were upfront about the self-centered nastiness involved); on the other side Glee’s “Blame it on the Alcohol,” wherein one character questions whether he might be bisexual only to be straight up told by the show’s most visible gay character that no, no, “bisexual” is just a term made up by gay people who aren’t brave enough to come all the way out yet (a statement the episode is pretty happy to go on and prove “right” by having said character decide his orientation-questioning was based purely on drunkenness). And of course, for media figures who identify as bi there is the constant questioning of their validity.

These issues are ongoing, nebulous, and entrenched in decades of homophobia, individual abuse and cultural subjugation. All that one film can ultimately manage is to tell its story of three individuals with sharp, poignant clarity (and a lot of sex jokes, because this is a Kevin Smith film). What tears Alyssa, Holden, and Banky (the film’s angry, repressed bisexual who frankly could merit his very own essay) apart is ultimately their inability to accept that they’re in different places in their sexual lives, forced to a breaking point by Holden’s outsider insistence that he knows how to fix everything if people would just listen to him. It’s about fear, insecurity and jealousy overwhelming love and communication, letting its characters pass through these larger, unsolved concerns while letting them exists as people in their own right. And (90s snapshot costume design aside) that’s what makes it timeless.

Image

That, and it has the single best riff on Jaws I’ve ever seen.

Source: The Mary Sue.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bi me!
PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:25 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
I'm not greedy, confused, or seeking attention: I'm bisexual

It can be especially isolating when you are threatened on nights out and told you are a f****t, but also that you are a poser by members of the gay community

By Jake Firthsen
9 July 2015

I was born bisexual. I find myself physically and emotionally attracted to both men and women. These are facts about me and will not change, however much I am told by other people that I am just confused or am secretly homosexual.

I don't even especially like using the term bisexual as I am of the firm belief that I could fall in love with someone no matter what their sex, gender or orientation were. But for ease I use it.

Being a teenager is confusing enough without having people tell you that you have to fit into a box. What if you don't fit into the boxes that are available? What if you want to pull two or three of those boxes together and make a fort? When I first became aware of sexuality I immediately felt there was something wrong. I knew there were gay people and straight people and I thought that was it. To fit in with friends at school I would act straight, and I wasn't lying, I did find the latest pop starlet or actress attractive. But there was something else, something unlike what the other boys were talking about. I found the leading men and boy bands attractive too.

I have to say that I am lucky and was born into a generally liberal and accepting society; if I had come out as gay I am sure I would have been supported. But when I approached someone I thought I could trust with my concerns they said I was just confused and was probably "going through a phase", and that I should "come back once I had decided one way or the other". At the time I wasn't developed or confident enough to realise that people who knew more than me about some things did not necessarily know more about everything, so I believed and trusted the advice I had been given.

A recent survey published by the ONS said there were roughly 220,000 people in the UK that class themselves as bisexual. Yet during my formative early teenage years I didn't even know that it existed.

Fortunately the internet was around during those confusing years which helped me find the information I had been searching for. Finally I was able to find like-minded people and read about how I wasn't confused or going through a phase, just different. I remember the first person I came out to was via MSN Messenger. As I gradually told more and more of my friends I felt more and more comfortable in myself. Like I could stop hiding and embrace who I was. Despite all this I never directly came out to my parents, I lived my life, brought guys and girls home and after a while they figured it out and just started talking about it like they had always known. I have always felt guilty for that.

Unfortunately, despite all of my friends being completely understanding and wonderful they were not the only people that I had to deal with. As I grew older and branched out into different communities I uncovered attitudes and prejudices that I could not even fathom. One particularly awful night out ended with me being followed into a toilet in a city centre bar by a group of straight men who said they were going to rape me because obviously I liked dick.

I have on multiple occasions been told by people who identify as homosexual that I am gay and just not brave enough to admit it. Or that I am in some way a poser and am acting the way I do for attention. To those people I would always ask whether any other area of their lives was binary? Were they always either happy or sad and nothing in between? Did they always pick the exact same type of person as their partner? Is it ever really that simple?

This attitude can be especially isolating when you are being told you are a f****t on nights out with friends, but then that you are a poser by members of the gay community.

There are as many different types of desire and love as there are people. Everyone feels and wants different things. There is no such thing as "greedy" when it comes to sexuality. In fact when it comes to me I find it very hard to hold down a relationship with either a man or a woman as often people find it hard to believe I can be in love with just them and not be looking for someone else to quench my insatiable lust.

Despite being proud of who I am, and my friends and family being proud of who I am, I am choosing to write this article anonymously. I work in a hyper masculine industry that is remarkably sexist and homophobic. I am not brave enough to bring that sort of attention to myself. Of course that is a shame, but I can only hope that we're moving towards a society that's more accepting of any and every sexuality.

To me having an opinion on someone else's sexuality is as pointless as having an opinion on whether someone else is left or right handed. I don’t have to deal with prejudice very often, mostly because I avoid situations in which it would come up. Just please believe me that I do exist, my sexuality is real, and I'm just as much capable and deserving of love as anyone else.

The author's name has been changed

Source: Independent UK

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2015 6:03 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Survey: One in two young Brits say they are not 100% straight
17 August 2015
by Darren Wee

Image

One in two young Brits do not identify as 100% straight, a new study has found.

Pollster YouGov asked 1,632 people to plot their sexuality on the Kinsey scale, where 0 is exclusively straight and 6 is exclusively gay.

Twenty-three per cent of respondents chose a number other than 0, and that figure rose to 49% among 18-24 year olds.

Taken as a whole, 72% of Brits place themselves at the completely straight end of the scale, while 4% put themselves at the completely gay end – 19% say they are somewhere in between.

The research noted that people of all generations now accept the idea that sexual orientation exists along a continuum, rather than a binary choice. Overall, 60% of straight people and 73% of gay people support this idea.

‘With each generation, people see their sexuality as less fixed in stone,’ it reads.

‘The results for 18-24 year-olds are particularly striking, as 43% place themselves in the non-binary area between 1 and 5 and 52% place themselves at one end or the other. Of these, only 46% say they are completely heterosexual and 6% as completely homosexual.’

Source: GayStarNews.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:37 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Lily-Rose Depp Maybe, Possibly Just Came Out On Instagram, For A Cause
by Sabrina Rojas Weiss
August 24, 2015

image

We hope that the decision for young people to come out as not heterosexual has become a tiny bit easier in the year 2015 than it was in generations past.

But when you're a 16-year-old whose parents have been longtime tabloid fodder, and whose own acting career is just about to bloom, that decision may come with its own complications. Or, maybe it doesn't. Today, Lily-Rose Depp may or may not have come out to the world via Instagram.

The photo appeared as part of photographer iO Tillett Wright's Self Evident Project, which, according to the site, "exists to spread awareness and understanding about a broader spectrum of human sexuality." As Wright told R29 via email, "The stipulation for having your portrait taken for the project is that you feel you are somewhere on the spectrum." The artist continued, "I'm not going to comment on where Lily-Rose falls, as that's her private business, but I did take her portrait for the project. I'm sure she will make her own commentary on sexuality and acceptance when she's ready to."

While the Instagram post reads that Lily-Rose "falls somewhere on the vast spectrum," Facebook and Tumblr posts with the same photo leave those words out. In the meantime, the Yoga Hosers star appears very clearly, adorably, and literally onboard with Wright. On the Self Evident Project's website, Depp's stepmother, Amber Heard, is one of the celebrities endorsing the project in a video explaining its purpose. Gaby Hoffmann, Kylie Minogue, Penn Badgley, Sia, and Steve Buscemi are among the other stars who appear in the video.

According to the site, the Self Evident Project is all about making it NBD for young people to come out, wherever they fall in the LGBTQ spectrum. The idea is for Wright to take portraits of people across the country who identify as "anything other than 100% straight," and eventually show 10,000 such portraits in an installation on the Washington Mall. In the Instagram photo, Depp is wearing one of the T-shirts being sold to raise funds for the project while spreading the message of acceptance at the same time.

Source: Refinery29.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2016 10:52 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Why You Should Give a Shit About Bi Visibility Day
By Christopher Giles
September 23, 2016

Today is Bi Visibility Day, which is exactly what it sounds like: an annual celebration of bisexuality. The idea is that by putting it in the spotlight every September the 23rd, bisexuality – and the issues bisexual people face – becomes more visible.

While participation in Bi Visibility Day has increased over the years, there's still a lack of resources on bisexuality – mostly because bi issues are often lumped together with LGBT ones as a sub-category, or ignored all together. Luckily, bi activist and author Kate Harrad has written the first handbook to bisexuality in the UK. Purple Prose: Bisexuality in Britain documents people's personal experiences of being bisexual and discusses intersectional topics like race and disability.

I sat down with Kate to ask her about the book and the importance of Bi Visibility Day.

VICE: How did Bi Visibility Day begin?
Kate Harrad: It started in America about 17 years ago, but it now takes place around the world. It was created by activists who were sitting around trying to work out some way of increasing the profile of bisexuality. They chose the 23rd of September because it was one of their birthdays. It's also the month of Freddie Mercury's birthday, who's one of the most famous bisexual people.

There are quite a few LGBTQIA awareness days throughout the year – why is it important to have a day dedicated to bisexuality?
I think it's important because we're not always visible. The problem that bisexual people face is that we can be invisible in straight and gay and lesbian communities. It sometimes leaves people feeling like they've got nowhere to go.

What challenges do bi people face within the LGBTQIA community?
Biphobia is not homophobia. We share a lot of the same issues, but we can get rejected by lesbian and gay communities. I've heard so many bisexual people talking about how they come out to gay and lesbian friends, and the response has been that they can't hang out any more. I've also heard stories of bisexual people calling up gay switchboards and they've been told "you're going through a phase". To get rejected from somewhere you were hoping to find acceptance is particularly worse in some ways. You'll get rejected from a lot of the straight communities, but at least you're prepared for it.

In terms of the day itself, what's involved?
The bi community is a very grassroots community. It tends to be local events where bi groups get together. There are book launches, poetry readings, discussion groups and workshops. There are events happening across the country.

You've written the UK's first guidebook to bisexuality, what motivated you to do this?
I woke up a few years ago and thought, 'Why isn't there a book about the bi community?' The only books available for the bi community were either published 25 years ago or focused on the American experience. There's also a lot of academic writing, but nothing current, accessible and British-based. The title Purple Prose came to me because purple is the bi colour. I knew all these people who had experiences of being bisexual in Britain and I just wanted to document it.

A lot of the book is about dispelling the myths and stigmas surrounding bisexuality. Which are the most pervasive?
One of the chapters in Purple Prose is called "Greedy, confused and invisible". These are three of the main myths about bisexuality. Firstly, there is this idea that bisexual people are never satisfied or that we are promiscuous. The presumption is that we need a lot of partners and will cheat. It's misunderstanding bisexuality and treating it as a personality type. Secondly, people think bisexuals are confused or that we should "pick a team" – something Christopher Biggins recently said on Big Brother. It also happens from the gay and lesbian side at Pride, where people shout "make your mind up". And lastly, it's about bi people being invisible. People assume all bi issues are subsumed in lesbian and gay issues. People tend to use the words bi, gay and lesbian interchangeably. In the media especially, newspapers tend to refer to people as gay when they have actually come out as bi.

The book features stories from people's lives about what it's like to be bisexual in the UK – why did you decide to produce the book in this way?
Well, there's not a lot of research on bi issues. They're caught up in LGBT issues and they don't tease out the bi stuff. But a lot of it comes down to people's lived experience of being bi and how that also relates to intersectional issues such as being disabled, black or ethnic minority, as well as religion. The book also covers sex, politics and coming out as bi in the work place – something we know bi people are less likely to do because of pressure directed from straight and gay communities. Reading about people's lived experience is also much more interesting.

Which stories had the greatest impact on you?
One of the chapters in the book is written by my friend who writes about the experience of being black in the bi community. He went to a bi event to seek sanctuary but was ignored. Within the bi community, one of our biggest problems is that we're very white and middle class. That leads to a lot of people being ignorant and racist in that very middle class way, where you haven't thought about the issues. This is an extreme version of being rejected by both groups. If you go to black groups as bi you can be rejected, and if you go to bi groups as a black person you can get racism and ignorance. You end up feeling like there really is nowhere safe for you to go at all. It's incredibly damaging to your mental health.

Are there experiences from your own life that have particularly motivated you to get involved in bi activism?
I've actually been very lucky. I haven't faced a huge amount of biphobia, and that's partly because I haven't come out that much. I've had stuff like bottles thrown at me when I've been walking down the street holding hands with another woman. A few years ago a group of us were in a gay pub and a boy and girl couple were snogging and we got thrown out. A lot of people I know have had worse experiences. It does really get to you.

Source: Vice News

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 10:03 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8227
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
200,000 people take part in Tel Aviv gay pride parade
Helena Piontek
9 June 2017

Tel Aviv (dpa) - Some 200,000 people took part in Tel Aviv's gay pride parade on Friday, according to the city's administration, which organizes the event.

The theme of this year's event, the largest of its kind in the Middle East and happening for the 20th time, is "bisexual visibility." At the parade, bisexuals Neomi Serrusi and Tom Cohen, who have been a couple for four years, were happy about this year's theme.

"A year ago, Neomi said to me she wanted to suggest bisexuality as the theme of the parade. I laughed and said, 'That'll never work,'" Tom said ahead of the post-parade party. The couple say that bisexuals have trouble being accepted on the gay scene. "Many people think it is only a phase. 'Some day you'll know if you are gay or hetero,' they say to me," the 27-year-old aide to an Israeli member of parliament said.

The couple say that although they feel part of the LGBT scene, sometimes when they kiss they get sideways glances. "I'm in a relationship with Tom, but I still find women attractive," Neomi, 30, said. "Being bisexual doesn't mean that you want to go to bed with the whole world," Tom added.

Margo Golan, 15, also said she was at the parade to offer her support. "Bisexuals are often valued on the scene as less than gays and lesbians," she said. "I'm here to support the bisexuals."

Tel Aviv is believed to have the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the region.

The parade started at 11 am at Meir Park, where the city's LGBT community centre is located, and made its way through the city and along the coast to a massive beach party in Charles Core Park "from 3 pm to sunset," according to the organizers. "We still have a long road ahead of us until we are a society in which everyone feels equal, is equal, and can live their lives as they want," Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai said as he opened the parade.

Tel Aviv councillor Efrat Tolkowsky hoped people would see the great success of the parade. "The parade is a clear statement that we are here, we are strong and we are many," Tolkowsky said.

Thousands of officers were deployed to the route of the parade and surrounding areas for security, according to the police.

In 2005, an ultra-Orthodox Jew attacked the pride parade in the more conservative city of Jerusalem and stabbed three people. Two years ago shortly after being released from prison for that attack, the same man stabbed a 16-year-old girl to death and injured six others.

Source: dpa

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 113 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group