TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:20 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 2:28 pm 
Offline
Night Stalker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2006 4:47 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Koln, Germany
Ken Russell's former wife contests will of mother's lesbian lover
By Andy McSmith
Thursday, 26 June 2008

Image
Hetty Baynes was given a star role by her ex-husband Ken Russell

The case of the sculptress, her £2.3m estate, an elderly lesbian with Alzheimer's disease and her severely indebted actress daughter reached London's High Court yesterday.

The actress is Hetty Baynes, who wrote and starred in the 1993 erotic short film, The Insatiable Mrs Kirsch, directed by her then husband, Ken Russell. Recently, she has found acting parts hard to obtain, and has run up heavy debts as she seeks to re-establish herself as a writer.

She has gone to court hoping to obtain a substantial legacy from the estate of the sculptress Mary Spencer Watson, whose Four Symbols of the Evangelists can be seen in Wells Cathedral.

Image
Dunshay Manor Estate

Image
Mary Spencer Watson

Spencer Watson, who died in 2006 aged 92, is recognised as one of the leading sculptors of her time. In her will, she left her home, Dunshay Manor Estate, near Purbeck, in Dorset, to the charity, The Landmark Trust. The house, with 15 acres of land and two cottages, is valued at £2m. She left other assets, including investments and works of art, totalling £300,000. She was the long-term lover of the beautician, Margot Baynes, the actress's mother, and supported Hetty Baynes financially like a daughter, the judge was told.

Ms Baynes, of Battersea, south London, is seeking to have her debts of £160,000 paid out of the estate. She also wants to use it to buy a £570,000 three-bedroom house in the Clapham area,plus £7,500 for a car, and £25,000 as a financial cushion for her and her 15-year-old son.

"In the months before her death, Mary was actively exploring methods of raising substantial capital to discharge Hetty's debts and buy her a house. That is the result that Hetty seeks in her claim," her counsel, Thomas Dumont told the court.

Margot Baynes, who is 90 and has Alzheimer's disease, is also suing the estate through her granddaughter Melissa. There was provision for her in the will, but her lawyers argue that it is not enough and that she needs at least £1.5m for 24-hour care.

But Jeffrey Terry QC, for the Landmark Trust, argued that their claims would destroy Ms Spencer Watson's dying wish to keep the Dunshay Manor Estate intact. He accused Hetty Baynes of being a financial disaster zone who finds it "impossible to live within her means", who had frittered away the "handouts" she had received while Ms Spencer Watson was alive and now wanted to "plunder" her estate.

Her first flat was bought for her by Ms Spencer Watson. She bought a house when her five-year marriage to Russell ended in divorce. In 2001, she was given money by Ms Spencer Watson for a deposit on another property. In 2002 Ms Spencer Watson added a codicil to her will saying that money from the residue of her estate after Dunshay Manor would go to Margot, then Margot's children, except Hetty "because she has already benefited". Mr Terry said: "Her history makes plain that any money conferred on her will be squandered: it will only be a matter of time before she is penniless and in debt again."

He also described the claim that Margot needed £1.5m for her future care as "quite fantastic" and "out of all proportion" to the £2,500 a year Ms Spencer Watson paid while she was alive.

The Spencer Watson family bought Dunshay Manor in the 1920s. The relationship between Mrs Baynes and Ms Spencer Watson began soon after Hetty's birth in 1955.

Ms Baynes, described by her counsel as a "very capable actress" debuted as a dancer at the age of 12 in Rudolf Nureyev's The Nutcracker. But Mr Dumont said that since Ms Spencer Watson's death, she had "slid further into debt" with liabilities of £160,000. She faces losing her home in August. The case continues.

From http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/ho ... 54319.html

_________________
Women are so much more!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 4:11 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Letters cast a new light on famous lesbian affair

Vanessa Thorpe, arts and media correspondent
Sunday July 13, 2008
The Observer

Image
Vita Sackville-West 1892

Funny, revealing and downright bitchy pen-portraits of the leading figures of the Bloomsbury Group, the key British literary stars of the 1920s and 1930s, have come to light in unpublished correspondence between the poet and novelist Vita Sackville-West and an aspiring young writer.

The letters, to novelist Margaret Howard, which are up for sale at the auction house Sotheby's on 17 July and are expected to fetch around £22,000, show the depth of Sackville-West's feeling for Virginia Woolf, with whom she had a long lesbian affair, and the amusement with which the aristocrat viewed the rest of Woolf's intellectual set of friends. Sackville-West, who was the model for Woolf's androgynous, time-travelling heroine Orlando, first began writing to Howard, her 'darling waif-novelist' in 1941, the year of Woolf's suicide. The letters make it clear that she was deeply moved by the young woman's appreciation of her dead lover's great talent.

'You make me very heartsick for Virginia at moments, your dazzled recognition of her genius, your excitement at discovering her,' Sackville-West writes. 'It is a landmark in one's life, reading her for the first time.'

Image
Virginia Woolf

Elsewhere in the text of the 150 private letters written to Howard over 20 years, Sackville-West bridles at the suggestion that Woolf was an unfeeling bluestocking. 'Virginia wasn't all cool intellect by any means,' she writes. 'She had the warmest and deepest and most human of affection for those she loved. They were few, perhaps, and she applied alarmingly high standards, but her love and humanity were real, once they were given.' In contrast she cruelly describes Woolf's close friend, the biographer Lytton Strachey, as 'lank and dank and depressing', adding: 'It gave me great pleasure to hear Virginia say to him once: "Lytton, you are like a dead slug in a well.""

Tales of the Bloomsbury circle fascinated Howard, but Sackville-West had a critical eye. She wrote of Aldous Huxley, author of Brave New World: 'He is so damn intelligent, but I loathe his attitude towards sex,' and she judged the literary hostess Ottoline Morrell: 'a very queer personality ... with masses of purple hair, a deep voice, teeth like a piano keyboard and the most extraordinary assortment of clothes, hung with barbaric necklaces ... a born bohemian by nature.'

Sackville-West, who grew up at the family seat of Knole in Kent, is perhaps best known today for the gardens she created at her home Sissinghurst Castle, also in Kent, with the aid of her diplomat husband, Harold Nicolson. In Woolf's day the writer, who frequently dressed in men's clothes, was also notorious for having eloped to France with her earlier lover, Violet Trefusis. Woolf's 1928 novel Orlando, which is dedicated to Sackville-West, was later described by Nigel Nicolson, Vita's son, as 'the longest and most charming love letter in literature'.

'This is a collection remarkable for the wealth of detail it provides on Vita's friendships,' said Sotheby's manuscripts specialist Tessa Milne.

Source: The Observer UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 7:35 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Ken Russell's ex-wife Hetty Baynes loses court bid over will of mother's lesbian lover
By Anita Singh, Showbusiness Editor
15 July 2008

The former wife of film director Ken Russell has lost a High Court battle over the estate of her mother's lesbian lover.

Hetty Baynes claimed she was entitled to a substantial share of the £2.3 million estate belonging to the late sculptress Mary Spencer Watson.

But Mr Justice Lewison dismissed the claim, ruling that the debt-laden Miss Baynes had "exploited" Miss Spencer Watson's generosity during her lifetime and was not entitled to a penny more.

"Her current financial plight is, I regret to say, largely of her own making," he said.

Miss Spencer Watson, an acclaimed artist, was in a relationship with Miss Baynes' mother, Margot, for 50 years until her death in 2006, aged 92. They lived at Dunshay Manor, Miss Spencer Watson's £2 million home in Purbeck, Dorset, where they raised the five Baynes children.

The court heard that Miss Spencer Watson treated Miss Baynes as a daughter and supported her financially, but left her just £2,500 in her will. Dunshay Manor was bequeathed to the Landmark Trust, a buildings preservation charity.

Miss Baynes, a struggling actress and writer who was married to Russell from 1992-1999, sought financial provision as a "dependent" of the estate. She requested a £570,000 house, £160,000 to discharge her debts, £7,500 for a car and a £25,000 "cushion" to help with her career, claiming that Miss Spencer Watson would have wanted her to be financially secure.

Her mother, Margot, now aged 90 and suffering from Alzheimer's, launched a separate £1.6 million claim on the estate.

But Mr Justice Lewison rejected both claims.

He ruled that Miss Spencer Watson had been "exceptionally generous" to Miss Baynes during her lifetime, giving her £171,000 in the four years before she died and buying her a flat when she left home in the 1970s.

Yet Miss Baynes "exploited Mary's generosity" and "mounted a sustained campaign to persuade Mary to pay off her debts and provide for her future", Mr Justice Lewison said, concluding: "This is not conduct which, in my judgment, should be rewarded."

After the hearing, Miss Baynes, 51, who has a 15-year-old son from her marriage to Mr Russell, said she intended to appeal. She faces a bill for up to £267,000 in legal costs.

The Landmark Trust said it was Miss Spencer Watson's "ardent desire" to preserve Dunshay intact as a memorial to her family.

Source: Telegraph UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 9:34 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Fans mourn as lesbian singer Katie Reider dies aged 30

By Ann Turner
July 18, 2008

Image
Reider was suddenly stricken with a terrifying illness

Cincinnati-born singer-songwriter Katie Reider, an out lesbian active in the LGBT community, has died from complications resulting from a two year battle with a rare facial tumour.

Reider, who has performed with such lesbian music icons as Melissa Ferrick, Michelle Malone and Catie Curtis, was just 30 years-old.

Reider was diagnosed with a myofibroblastic inflammation tumour two years ago, which eventually left her totally unable to perform.

Although recent chemotherapy treatments seemed hopeful, Reider died from a sudden brain haemorrhage early on Monday morning.

A member of OutMusic.com, Reider was a frequent performer at gay Pride celebrations and performed during her career with luminary musicians as Ferrick, Malone, Curtis, Antigone Rising, Ember Swift and Shawn Mullins.

By 2006, Reider had already garnered thousands of fans nationwide and had done national spots on ABC television, Dawson"s Creek on WB and on Lifetime Television"s Strong Medicine.

Then, at the peak of her musical career, Reider was suddenly stricken with a terrifying illness.

The young singer was diagnosed with a rare myofibroblastic inflammation tumour in her upper left jaw, which rapidly grew to eventually take away her sight in one eye, and finally, her voice.

In May, one of Reider"s fans and friends, Lauren Fernandes, launched a web site where supporters could donate $1 for a digital download of Katie"s Voice, a digital compilation of nine of Reider"s original songs.

The site, www.500kin365.org, was created to help Reider"s family pay for medical bills.

Now the money raised for the site will also help to cover Reider"s funeral arrangements.

Reider"s family recently reported that chemotherapy treatments had shrunk the singer"s tumour significantly.

In late June, an MRI revealed the tumour appeared to be 95 percent to 97 percent gone, according to Reider"s 500kin365 MySpace page.

A post from Reider on the Katie Reider Band MySpace page on June 21 showed the young singer in strong spirits after taking a vacation to her father's house in Maine, saying the trip was "truly amazing" and she had enjoyed "some of the most beautiful sights I have ever seen."

Reider had planned to return for another visit in August.

Sadly, the shrinkage from the chemotherapy that had so encouraged hope for a final recovery resulted in a severe haemorrhage in Reider"s brain as the tumour became dislodged.

At first doctors were able to stop the bleeding, according to Cincinnati.com, and Reider was scheduled for surgery in early August to remove the remainder of the tumour.

Bleeding in Reider"s brain began again on Sunday, however, and she died while in transport to Beth Israel Hospital in New York City.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.

Source: PinkNews.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2008 6:30 am 
Offline
Night Stalker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2006 4:47 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Koln, Germany
Hi Victor, here's another famous lesbian for the ranks! And don't we all love her. :happy0065:

Johann Hari: How Navratilova leads the way for lesbians

Gay women face a different prejudice to gay men and are trailing 20 years behind

Monday, 24 November 2008

Image
Martina Navratilova in 'I'm A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here'

There's something strangely soothing about this year's I'm A Celebrity - Get Me Out of Here! If the credit crunch gets much worse we'll all be living on kangaroo testicles with a side-dish of maggots, so it is pleasing to see Robert Kilroy-Silk go through it first, in a cage, on live television, with Timmy Mallet cackling in his face.

But there's something even richer and sweeter about this series: the Zen-like poise of Martina Navratilova as she wades through slime and Wags. The tennis genius has an inherent dignity that even Ant and Dec cannot dent.

If — when — she is voted Queen of the Jungle by the British public, it will be another small symbolic step in the struggle for equality for lesbians.

Gay women face a different kind of prejudice to gay men, and in many ways they are trailing 20 years behind. It is only now that major public figures are finally coming out, and if you look at the crude abuse Navratilova was pepper-sprayed with for decades, it is not hard to see why.

Her biography is remarkable. At the aged of 18 she became a refugee from Czech Communist tyranny, swiftly thwacked her way to the top of women's tennis, and stayed there for 25 years.

Yet from the moment she began to speak about her sexuality, she was portrayed as a robotic muscle-dyke cruelly pounding her wholesome blonde, all-American rival Chrissy Evert. She lost her lucrative sponsorship deals. She was booed in the stands.

But the lesbian writer Julie Bindel tells me: "Seeing her walk out onto the court at Wimbledon was the best feeling in the world.

"She was the first role model for my generation of lesbians. You suddenly had this woman who was immensely talented, a feminist of sorts, and even won the respect of the men in the sport. You thought: if she can do it after all she's been through, you can too."

Yet you can see on the tv show how much more comfortable we are with gay men than lesbians. The contestants have a vocabulary to talk affectionately about sexuality to the gay men there: they make joshing camp asides, and everyone laughs.

But when it comes to Martina's lesbianism, they are silent, or bemused. Kilroy asked her: "Do you look at girls and fancy them?" Yes, Robert, lesbians fancy women.

This ripple of bemusement — tinged with hostility — runs through our culture. (As a gay man, I'm embarrassed to say that even gay culture is littered with anti-lesbian jokes.) Last year, it was ruled that lesbians could be denied in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, and there was very little protest. This weekend, a smear-piece in a right-wing newspaper said Navratilova "broke up a family" by snatching away "a devoted home-maker." The dykes want your wives! Run!

Prejudice against gay men has receded more quickly; it is rarely expressed as blatantly as this in public. Why? Perhaps the most obvious explanation lies with sexism.

Lesbians reject men sexually — and that shocks us. A woman who doesn't want to please men? Wha-at? Our culture is — in its very bone marrow — built around pleasing men. Little girls are taught it as an automatic assumption. So the only way we can assimilate lesbians is to turn them into porn. Then they are useful to men once more.

But the reasons also lie in the crooked timber of history.

In most cultures at most points in history, gay men have found small cultural niches where they could meet, but gay women have been denied even that. Women were dependent on men for money and they were largely confined to the home. We know sometimes they found each other. The recently-discovered diaries of an early 19th-century Yorkshire woman called Ann Lister show how she sought out affairs with women by asking if they had read Sappho — but these opportunities were fleeting. So for millennia, lesbians weren't even demonised as gay men were; the world simply seemed to say that they didn't exist.

Whenever proof emerged that women could lust after women, it was swiftly burned: the amazing poetry of Sappho was incinerated in era after era by popes and Crusaders.

In more subtle ways, this denial persists. When Pam St. Clement was on This Is Your Life, her female partner was nowhere to be seen. The role of spouse was taken by the actor who played her husband on EastEnders. When Susan Sontag died recently, most obituaries mentioned neither her sexuality nor her partner, Annie Leibowitz, as if they were holes in the air.

Lesbians have had to swing from invisible to mainstream in just a century — and to do it while climbing up the sheer face of sexism.

The coming-out of the Hollywood star Lindsay Lohan was an achievement, but buried in her story was also a sign of how far we all still have to go. Several gossip-sheets gleefully showed close-ups of the scars on her arms. If Lohan does cut herself, it wouldn't be surprising: gay teenagers are seven times more likely to self-harm or commit suicide than their straight contemporaries.

Laura Rhodes — a witty, loud Welsh girl — is just another recent case showing why this long, long story has to end. She told a friend she thought she might be gay when she was twelve, and soon began to be attacked and beaten as "the school dyke". She turned to her school for help — but they said she was herself part of the problem.

Cefn Saeson School's education welfare officer, Helen Langford, said Laura's "verbal indiscretion" — talking openly about her sexuality — was the cause of her bullying.

Langford wrote: "Laura fully realises and appreciates she must accept the blame for the current situation." In the end, the school decided the solution was for Laura to move schools. She took an overdose of prescription pills and died in hospital.

This story of the denial of a basic human sexuality ends here, like this.

But if they could watch Martina Navratilova — a wise, cool lesbian — win a national popularity contest, what would Laura Rhodes or Ann Lister or Sappho say?

I think they would feel a small sense of satisfaction — and then, with a warmed heart, they would vote for Kilroy to be force-fed more maggots.

From http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/co ... 32218.html

_________________
Women are so much more!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 6:42 pm 
Offline
Night Stalker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2006 4:47 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Koln, Germany
BBC unveils drama about 'first modern lesbian'
By Jonathan Brown
16 October 2009

Image
Anne Lister c. 1830 in a portrait by Joshua Horner

The life and times of Anne Lister, the woman dubbed the first modern lesbian by scholars of sexuality and known as Gentleman Jack to her Yorkshire neighbours, is to be the subject of a lavish new costume drama.

Shameless star Maxine Peake, whose previous roles include Myra Hindley, is due to play the heroine in the one-off special for BBC Two. Filming of The Scandalous Diaries of Anne Lister is expected to get underway next month at the 19th century polymath"s former home Shibden Hall near Halifax which she shared with her "wife" - another local heiress called Anne Walker with whom she underwent a same-sex marriage ceremony.

Lister chronicled her pioneering life and wide-ranging travels as well as her relationships in an at times sexually charged four million word collection of diaries which she kept until her premature death in 1840 aged 51 after being bitten by an insect while travelling in the Caucasus Mountains.
Large parts of the journals were encrypted and only decoded in the 1930s. She developed the special code to exchange letters with her first lover Eliza Raine and then the married Marianna Belcombe Lawton with whom she maintained a relationship for 16 years.

While the diaries are at times sexually explicit, Lister referred to orgasms as "kisses", marking her diary with a cross to indicate when she had experienced one.

Shunning the conventions of the time, she adopted a masculine style and always dressed in black. She was the first woman to be elected to the committee of the Halifax Literary and Philosophical Society and was known as a tenacious businesswoman who developed coal mining interests on her estate and oversaw major improvements to the 15th century manor house she inherited from her uncle.

Among the entries she made in the diaries was one from October 1820 which read: "I love and only love the fairer sex and thus beloved by them in turn, my heart revolts from any love but theirs." Another from the same year said: "Yet my manners are certainly peculiar, not all masculine but rather softly gentleman-like. I know how to please girls."

From: The Independent UK.

_________________
Women are so much more!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:00 am 
Offline
Night Stalker
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2006 4:47 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Koln, Germany
Here's a much broader article about Anne Lister!
====================================

The very naughty diaries of a woman called Gentleman Jack and why her bodice-ripping lesbian confessions are being turned into a TV drama

By Glenys Roberts
5th December 2009

Written in code, her confessions of bodice-ripping affairs with other women were so scandalous her family hid them for over a century. No wonder they're being turned into a new TV drama...

She called her sexuality 'her oddity', but Anne Lister was never ashamed of it. 'I love and only love the fairer sex and thus am beloved by them in return. My heart revolts from any other love than theirs,' she declared.

Anne is often called 'the first modern lesbian' - although the term wasn't coined until nearly 50 years after her death in 1840. She wanted to be accepted openly for what she was: a woman who would never fall in love with a man, a woman who was entranced by young girls. Most strikingly of all, she was a woman who wanted to act like a man - in her private and public life.

Image
Steamy drama: Anne Lister's diaries will adapted for television after the success of the BBC's similar costume drama 'Tipping The Velvet' (pictured)

She set out blatantly to seduce her targets, noting her successes and her disappointments in a diary in the most salacious detail, even down to the number of sexual climaxes she experienced. Indeed, she marked the pages with an 'X' whenever she had one. The remarkable Anne Lister filled 27 volumes with such experiences, yet few people have ever heard of her. Well aware of the shocking content of her diaries, she deliberately disguised many of the more provocative entries in an almost impenetrable code, which looked similar to ancient hieroglyphs.

After her death, a relative feared that their family would be engulfed by scandal if any of these books ever came to light and decided to board them up behind a panel at the family home. They lay undiscovered for more than a century until they were found by chance during building work. A local historian, Helena Whitbread, spent years translating them and now the BBC is about to turn Anne's story into a new costume drama - a real-life Tipping The Velvet (which was a late-19th-century tale of a lesbian love affair).

The Scandalous Diaries Of Anne Lister stars the actress Maxine Peake, who rose to fame as one of Victoria Wood's Dinnerladies and has played Myra Hindley. Anne's prolific observations, which run to a total of four million words, are not all about sex. They include fascinating details of her day-to-day life: of shopping expeditions and the outcry over the new vaccination for smallpox, of tooth extractions and scarlet fever, of church-going and musical evenings and doing the household accounts.

Later, she meddles in politics and makes imaginative improvements to her estate. But all this happens against a backdrop of her descriptions of her seductions - all recounted in heart-fluttering detail. These include her courtship of a rich heiress which ended in a very modern same-sex union.

But who was Anne Lister? Born in Halifax, West Yorkshire, in 1791, she was the daughter of a soldier who served in the American War of Independence; her mother was a farmer's daughter from East Riding. Although she had four brothers, all died early and so it fell to Anne to inherit a spectacular family property, the 15th-century Shibden Hall. The house remains to this day and is so lovely it's a major tourist attraction and is being used this month for the filming of her extraordinary story.

The teenage Anne, already fed up with her bourgeois parents,became the ward of a much more broad-minded married uncle and aunt. From the start, she was a local curiosity. Dark and masculine-looking with a deep voice, she was easily bored with the humdrum round of tea parties and frilly frocks. Instead, she liked dressing in black and loved the male pursuits of shooting and riding. The locals nicknamed her 'Gentleman Jack'.

Anne had an unusually lively mind and quite apart from her sexual preferences would have found it difficult to settle down to the obedient existence expected of a woman in those days. And so she devised a rigorous plan for self-improvement. She learned classics, music, geography, history and French and thus came across the works of Jean Jacques Rousseau, the philosopher whose ideas influenced the French Revolution and the Romantic movement.

Anne was particularly struck by a passage in his Confessions: 'I know my own heart and I understand the human race. But I am not like anyone else I have ever met and I dare say I am not like anyone else in the whole world.' Suddenly she had found her licence to be different.

Her first relationship started at the age of 13 with a contemporary, Eliza Raine ('a girl of colour' whose father was an East India Company surgeon). The two shared a room at a fashionable York boarding school, the Manor, and Anne soon started keeping a diary about their affair, coming up with her secret code to disguise the sexual nature of the entries.

Anne - who referred to Eliza as 'her husband' - was clearly already yearning for a lesbian relationship which would have the longevity and intimacy of marriage. But when Eliza suffered a nervous breakdown, Anne developed into a serial seducer. 'I know how to please women,' she wrote.

By the age of 21, she had entered into a relationship with a wealthy heiress, Isabella Norcliffe. Always keen to better herself, Anne loved this older woman's social standing and was intrigued by tales of her European travels - but put off by her excessive drinking. Isabella would knock back up to seven glasses of wine at night and then fall asleep and start snoring before they could embark on more intimate pursuits. It was Isabella who introduced Anne to the love of her young life, Mariana Belcombe.

Mariana called Anne 'Fred' and, in turn, Anne was bowled over by Mariana's femininity. The pair embarked on a passionate affair, leading to a smattering of 'Xs' being recorded in the diary. But in 1815, Mariana decided to marry an older landowner, Charles Lawton, who was able to keep her more comfortably than her girlfriend could. Anne, bitterly hurt by this betrayal, convinced herself that it was only money that was keeping them apart. Hoping she would be able to win back her married ex-lover, she managed to arrange a series of clandestine meetings. But these infrequent encounters over the years were not enough for the highly sexed Anne, who vacillated between her old unsatisfactory standby Isabella, to whom she was no longer attracted, and fresh conquests.

One such was Maria Browne, whom she met while attending a course of lectures in Halifax. 'Did nothing but dream of Miss Browne,' she confided to her diary. 'She is certainly very pretty.' As the daughter of a self-made businessman, Maria was considered socially inferior to the land- owning Listers, so Anne decided to educate her by sending her a copy of Byron's poetry. Soon the two were meeting at the local library and exchanging glances in church - and local tongues were wagging because the two disparate families would never normally be on close terms.

Anne dished out compliments to Maria whenever they met, but increasingly began to despair about deepening their relationship. 'I wonder if I can ever mould her to my purpose,' she told her diary. She tried everything, but after two years had got no further than a kiss on the lips. When Maria got married, a frustrated Anne came to terms with her loss by telling herself that the object of her desire wasn't intelligent enough for her anyway, dismissing her as 'this girl who not long ago was so much in my mind... I shall never care to behold her again'.

This series of relationships clearly showed that Anne was a woman of rollercoaster emotions. She had often recorded bouts of depression as a result of her long periods of separations from Maria and took comfort in fantasising about seducing other women. 'Foolish fancying about Caroline Greenwood,' she wrote, 'meeting her on Skircoat Moor, taking her into a shed there and being connected with her. Supposing myself in men's clothes.' She also discusses whether her orientation was natural and concluded it was, because her relationships were always driven by affection. She speculated that a lot more women shared her sexual preferences than she had first thought.

To try to get their complicated feelings into perspective, in 1822 she and Mariana Belcombe (minus her unsuspecting husband) decided to go to Wales to visit the notorious 'couple' Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby, a relative of Lady Caroline Lamb, known as the Ladies of Llangollen. These two daughters of well-born families were famous throughout Britain for having run away together to a rural retreat rather than face the prospect of arranged marriages. Anne wanted to see for herself whether their relationship went beyond friendship. Having concluded that it did, her diaries become even bolder and she has no compunction in describing her multiple orgasms with Mariana, calling them 'kisses', in the vernacular of the time.

But some of the most fascinating detail is not erotic. The restless Anne's next trip is to France with her father and sister. The group set off from Hull on board the steam-packet Favourite.

They paid 1/3d for breakfast for everyone on board and noted that the serving woman was given less than a modern penny. They arrived in London the next day and stayed in Webb's Hotel near the Tower of London, where the ghoulish remains of three ne'erdowell Malay sailors were still hanging from the gibbets. After making the three-hour boat-trip from Dover to Calais, they spent two weeks in Paris. But this time spent with her family made Anne very irritated by their conventional ways. At the heart of her dissatisfaction was frustration. She was now 31 and longed to be more powerful than her gender and middle-class background allowed.

She dreamed, at a time when women did not have the vote, of taking a meaningful role in politics. She imagined herself being presented at court and given a title.

She was also desperately lonely. 'Could not sleep last night,' she tells her diary, 'Dozing, hot and disturbed ... a violent longing for a female companion came over me. Never remember feeling it so painfully before.'

The pent-up longing came to a head when Mariana was finally due to visit her again. Ignoring all conventions, Anne could not wait for her lover's coach to arrive in Halifax and set out on foot to meet it, walking more than ten miles in three hours in her eagerness. When she finally caught a glimpse of the woman she loved she could not help bounding into her arms - to the huge embarrassment of onlookers. Although the two women leapt into bed together that night as usual, this time the long-awaited reunion only served to underline their differences. Anne, with her usual plain speaking, observed that they were technically guilty of 'adultery'.

In any case, she had always considered Mariana's marriage legal prostitution. Clearly upset, Mariana retaliated and declared herself ashamed of Anne's bizarre masculine appearance and inability to control herself in public. The final realisation that they were incompatible struck Anne so forcefully that she wrote down the exact moment the revelation came to her - Thursday, August 21, 3.55pm, 1823.

It took Anne another ten years to find the like-minded woman companion of her dreams with whom she could settle down openly. Remarkably, her family gave her considerable support. Indeed, her uncle told her that since she was unlikely to marry, at least she would not fall into the clutches of some adventurer who only wanted to get his hands on their beloved house.

In the meantime, Anne travelled round Britain and the Continent. On one trip to Paris, she was accompanied by a young woman friend called Vere Hobart, whose aristocratic connections helped to fulfil her social ambitions. This time she saw the French capital from lofty ambassadorial circles and acquired some wild female lovers whose experimental sexual practices managed to shock even her. On her return, she tried to set up home in Hastings with Miss Hobart, only for this arrangement to end when - like most of her paramours - her young friend decided to get married.

Disappointed in love once more, out of her depth in her new social circles and lacking the money to keep up, for the first and last time Anne briefly contemplated copying her beloved Mariana by finding a rich and senile man to marry.

Image
Shibden Hall

Living in Hastings made her homesick for Shibden Hall.

Just at this point, a rich young heiress called Ann Walker, who owned land neighbouring Shibden, came into Anne's life. They had already met in 1821 when Ann was just 17, but after the death of the younger woman's parents and brother, Anne Lister set about wooing her impressionable neighbour to protect their mutual interests as landowners against what she saw as the vulgar new money created by the Industrial Revolution.

Anne Lister was now 41, the vulnerable Miss Walker, 29. They got on 'marvellously', she recorded. Anne's erotic fantasies now centred on her new friend. 'Incurred an "X" last night thinking of her,' she wrote. Soon she proposed to her young lover that they should live together at Shibden, taking her hand and feeling her pulse racing. 'She's in for it, if ever a girl was,' she told her diary. 'And I am, too.' Finally they exchanged rings and made wills in each other's favour, providing also for their families as any married couple might.

However, it was not an easy 'marriage'. Anne Lister was manipulative, Ann Walker neurotic. Their sex life was sporadic - many diary entries started with the confession 'no kisses' - but the Walker money helped Anne Lister make many improvements to Shibden, enabling her to sink her own coal mine and, as a contributor to the new economic boom, become a figure of some standing in the local community.

Yet the incorrigible Anne Lister was already starting to speculate that the relationship might not last when she died at the age of 49 of a fever caught on a trip to Russia. Miss Walker had the body embalmed and brought home to Halifax. It was the least she could do for this intrepid pioneer of same-sex relationships (more than 150 years before gay partnerships were eventually to be enshrined in British law) and whom she had wanted to marry, as Anne had put it, by ' declaring it on the Bible and taking the sacrament at church'.

Source: Daily Mail UK.

_________________
Women are so much more!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 9:31 am 
Offline
Tentative Sexplorer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:49 am
Posts: 102
Location: London
Hi everyone, happy holidays! :happy0005:
Isn't she HOT! And of course there's also Sigourney Weaver in Avatar !


Michelle Rodriguez's sex tape vow
14 December 2009

Image
Michelle Rodriguez

'Avatar' actress Michelle Rodriguez would make a sex tape if she wanted to reveal her true sexuality and says the speculation over her sex life is frustrating.

The 'Avatar' actress has long been rumoured to be bisexual or a lesbian despite insisting she isn't, and says if she had anything to prove to anyone she would do it on camera.

She said in an interview with Style magazine: "If I wanted to tell people what I do with my vagina, I'd have made a sex video a long time ago. Largely, people don't know the whole story about anything. But still they need to put a name on it so they can label it and put it on the side and not dedicate any time to figuring it out. It's laziness."

Rodriguez - who was romantically linked to her openly bisexual 'Bloodrayne' co-star Kristanna Loken in 2006 - also revealed she aspires to be like Angelina Jolie.

The 31-year-old actress admires 34-year-old Angelina - who is openly bisexual but currently in a long-term relationship with Brad Pitt - for the action-packed roles she takes on and the sexual energy she exudes.

She said: "I like women like Angelina Jolie because of her ability to harness masculine and feminine energy into one. There are certain people who are so sexual that it doesn't matter how old they get, they are still sexual. Angie, at 50, will still be sexual."

from http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show ... e-vow.html

_________________
As a woman I not only want it all, I expect to get it.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 7:38 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Lindsay has a masked ball
By EMILY SMITH and DAVID K. L I
May 18, 2010

Lindsay Lohan has a new, cougar lesbian lover -- stunning photographer and reality-show star Indrani.

Lohan, 23, who previously dated deejay Samantha Ronson, has been secretly seeing Indrani, 36 -- half of the respected lens duo of Markus Klinko and Indrani -- since the women worked together on a photo shoot last fall. Sources say Lohan and Indrani, also known as Julia I. Pal-Chaudhuri, have been on a series of dates in LA and recently spent the night at Lohan's hotel.

Indrani told The Post, "We have been spending a lot of time together. I have never had a relationship with a woman before, but Lindsay is just somebody who I find fascinating, gorgeous and extremely smart, as well as super-hot.

Image
HOT COUPLE: A masked Lindsay Lohan, 23, gets cozy with photographer Indrani, 36.

"Lindsay gets a lot of bad press, but she's a really strong, creative woman and is trying really hard to get her life in a good, positive place." Klinko said the pair are good for each other. "Lindsay and Indrani have been seeing each other since we shot her last fall," he said. "I've seen them on dates, I have seen them making out . . . Indrani is a good influence on Lindsay. She is the opposite of a party girl -- a Princeton graduate, she's into art and is a philanthropist -- not what you'd expect the typical girl for Lindsay to go out with. When they are together, they talk about art and the deeper meaning in life."

Source: New York Post.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 7:34 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Barbara Grier, Publisher of Lesbian Books, Dies at 78
By PAUL VITELLO
November 13, 2011
by Mark Foley

Barbara Grier, a founder of one of the most successful publishing houses for books by and about lesbians, including a nonfiction chronicle about lesbian nuns that became a phenomenon after it drew complaints from Roman Catholic officials, died on Thursday in Tallahassee, Fla. She was 78.

Image
Barbara Grier, left, and Donna McBride, founders of Naiad Press, in 1993.

The cause was lung cancer, said her partner, Donna McBride.

Ms. Grier became a revered figure to several generations of lesbian writers and readers after founding Naiad Press in 1973 with three other women, including Ms. McBride. Armed with just $3,000, they set out to publish books, as Ms. Grier later described them, “about lesbians who love lesbians, where the girl is not just going through a phase.”

That comment referred to the lesbian-themed romance novels she had read as a girl, growing up in the 1940s, in which the heroine dallied with a female lover but ended up with a man, reflecting what publishers considered the only acceptable happily-ever-after outcome.

Naiad Press published over 500 books with unconditionally lesbian themes during the next 30 years — romance novels, histories, erotica, volumes of poetry, science fiction and self-help guides.

Ms. Grier’s most controversial and successful book, “Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence,” was a 1985 nonfiction work by two former nuns, based on interviews with 50 former and active nuns who were lesbians like them. Nancy Manahan, one of the authors, wrote in the foreword to the book that its intent was to break the silence about “erotic love between women in religious life.”

When a local television station in Boston promoted an interview with Ms. Manahan and her co-writer, Rosemary Curb, local Catholic officials complained, saying the broadcast would be “an affront to the sensitivity of Roman Catholics.” The station canceled the segment, but publicity over the episode gave the book a “banned in Boston” cachet that sent sales soaring.

“This is crazy,” Ms. Grier told The New York Times, scrambling in ensuing weeks to fill new orders for the book, which eventually sold several hundred thousand copies. “I’m a mouse giving birth to an elephant.”

The main customers of Naiad Press were the hundreds of lesbian and feminist bookstores that sprouted up across the country in the 1970s and ’80s, at the dawn of the sexual-identity liberation movement. When Ms. Grier and Ms. McBride retired, in 2003, the company’s book list was taken over by Bella Books, a publisher specializing in lesbian-themed romance novels.

In addition to contemporary novels (including many by Sarah Aldridge, the pen name of Anyda Marchant, another Naiad founder, along with her partner, Muriel Crawford), Ms. Grier reprinted several books considered seminal works in the lesbian canon, including Gertrude Stein’s prose poem “Lifting Belly” and the poetry of Renée Vivien, a British bohemian famous at the turn of the last century as much for her openly lesbian life as for her Symbolist poems.

The most famous American lesbian novel of the ’70s, “Rubyfruit Jungle,” was not published by Ms. Grier. She and the book’s author, Rita Mae Brown, who has since described herself as bisexual, belonged to different camps in the era’s roiling politics of lesbian activism, said Victoria Brownworth, the author of a profile of Ms. Grier in “Before Stonewall: Activists for Gay and Lesbian Rights in Historical Context,” a 2002 collection of biographical sketches.

But Ms. Brownworth described Ms. Grier as the premier editor to two generations of American lesbian writers, a mentor whose guidance helped formulate “new ways of defining ourselves during a time that saw tectonic shifts in the culture.” Ms. Grier, she said, was “the Maxwell Perkins of lesbian literature.”

Barbara Grier was born on Nov. 4, 1933, in Cincinnati, the oldest of three daughters of Phillip and Dorothy Grier. Her father, a physician, became an intermittent presence in the household beginning when she was about 5. Her mother worked as a secretary.

In addition to Ms. McBride, Ms. Grier is survived by her two sisters, Diane Grier and Penni Martin.

When Ms. Grier was 12, she told her mother that she was “a homosexual,” Ms. Grier said in the “Before Stonewall” profile. “Mother said since I was a woman, I wasn’t a homosexual, I was a lesbian. She also said that since I was 12, I was a little young to make this decision and we should wait six months to tell the newspapers.”

A few years later, when her sexual identity seemed fully mature, Ms. Grier received two of her first lesbian-themed books from her mother. Both were classics of the genre: “The Well of Loneliness,” a novel by the British writer Radclyffe Hall, which caused a scandal when it was published in 1928; and “Of Lena Geyer,” a 1936 novel by Marcia Davenport, a regular contributor to The New Yorker.

Ms. Grier never attended college. She went to work after graduating high school to help support the family, Ms. McBride said, adding: “Books were her education. She read everything, all kinds of books.” But for her, books that made lesbians feel secure in their sexual identities were the best. “Her goal in publishing,” Ms. McBride added, “was to make lesbians happy about themselves.”

Source: New York Times.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 7:39 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Lesbian publishing house founder Grier dies at 78
By Bill Kaczor
17 November 2011

Image

Barbara Grier, a founder of what once was the world's largest publishing house of literature about gays and lesbians, has died. She was 78.

Her partner in life and business, Donna McBride, said Grier died of lung cancer on Thursday at a hospital in Tallahassee, Fla.

Tallahassee-based Naiad Press was best known for publishing "Lesbian Nuns: Breaking Silence" in 1985. Fifty-one former or current nuns contributed to the book. It described relationships in their religious communities that sometimes turned into love affairs.

"It was her belief that through literature she could make lesbians feel good about themselves and find a happy life," McBride said from her home in nearby Carrabelle,Fla. Naiad was publishing 36 books a year before she and Grier sold the company to Bella Books, another publisher of literature about lesbians in Tallahassee, and retired in 2003, McBride said.

Grier was "a savior to isolated lesbians all over the world, many of whom feel intense gratitude," author Karin Kallmaker told The Associated Press. "I have no doubt that books save lives and Barbara put books into the lesbian universe at a rate no one in that era matched." Kallmaker's first novel was published by Naiad Press in 1989 and she's now editorial director of Bella Books.

Grier was born on Nov. 4, 1933 in Cincinnati and realized at an early age she was a lesbian, according to the Ohio Historical Society's Gay Ohio History Initiative. She began writing for The Ladder and later became the editor of the San Francisco-based lesbian magazine.

She met McBride, then a librarian, in 1967 while living in Kansas City, Mo. They launched the publishing house with two other women in 1973 with a $2,000 investment, keeping their regular jobs and working on Naiad from their home after hours. Most of their titles were romances and mysteries, McBride said. They moved to Florida and had their first big success when they published, in 1983, Katherine Forrest's first novel, "Curious Wine." It sold more than 400,000 copies.

"It would be hard to imagine a more significant figure in the growth and development of lesbian publishing in the 20th century than Barbara Grier," Forrest told the AP. "Or a more towering and central figure in lesbian culture."

Grier explained the reasons for their efforts in a 1993 interview with The Associated Press. "We're doing this because of commitment as well as money," Grier said. "We're getting to live our lives exactly as we want to - and make a living. We're getting rich and we're happy and what more can you ask for?" McBride said their happiest moment together was on Sept. 5, 2008, when they wed in California after same-sex marriages were legalized there.

Grier's body was cremated and there will be no funeral service, McBride said. She said she'll probably scatter her ashes in the Bahamas, Grier's favorite place.

Associated Press writer Karen Sloan contributed to this report from London.
Source: PrideSource.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 6:45 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Swing out, sisters...the Jessie J debate
by Lucy Brisbane
20 April 2012

Like Jessie J, a new generation of celebrities refuses to be defined by their sexuality. Our writer says they are role models for young women like her

Image
Lovers of equal opportunities: (from left) Janelle Monáe, Rihanna, Jessie J, Sam Ronson and Beth Ditto

Yesterday Jessie J’s sexuality was back in the headlines as an unauthorised biography claimed that the British singer was told not to come out as gay because it may “alienate fans”. The author, Chloe Govan, alleges Jessie was advised to say she is bisexual, because it would come across as more “trendy” and would further “increase her allure”.

While Jessie rubbished the book’s claims on Twitter, she has always been open about her sexual ambiguity and announced during a performance last year, at Soho’s G-A-Y of all places: “I’m not bisexual. I’m not gay. I’m not straight. If I love a girl, I love a girl. If I love a guy, I love a guy. I’m not going to label myself. I’m not going to put myself in a little box for people that don’t know who they are.”

I have to admit, I’m with Jessie. At the age of just 19 (Jessie is 24) I’ve been in love with both boys and girls. But being bisexual, or gay, or whatever, is not something I’d ever be ashamed of. And with a new wave of sexually — and sexuality — free female role models coming through our mainstream music, film, television, and even fashion worlds, nor should any young woman.

Megastar Lady Gaga has previously admitted that she likes the ladies, but said she believes it also intimidates the men she would like to date, too. Which I doubt was what actress and sex symbol Megan Fox had in mind when she discussed her own bisexuality with Esquire magazine — when she revealed she used to have a stripper girlfriend called Nikita. The drooling readers of men’s magazines aside, Rihanna too has admitted to fantasies about Fox, and although she denies previous lesbian experience herself, the Bajan singer told a British newspaper: “All humans are born with the ability to be attracted to both sexes. I mean, I could see myself in a relationship with a girl.”

Openly bisexual actress Anna Paquin, who is married to her True Blood co-star Stephen Moyer, also added her own two-pence worth to the topic last year: “The more people talk about it, the less of a deal it will be.”

In my own opinion, quite right, Anna. Whatever a celebrity’s own reason for coming out, the more we hear about different sexual persuaions and experimentation, the more openness we have on the topic, the more normal it becomes. And easier for a people to say, with pride, and in the wise words of Katy Perry: “I kissed a girl and I liked it.”

Other openly gay and bisexual female celebrities include Lindsay Lohan’s ex-girlfriend, singer-songwriter and DJ, Sam Ronson, also sister of Mark. However, she was annoyed by the media calling her “openly gay” and says, which I rather like, that she is an “equal opportunity player”.

Over in the fashion world, Danish supermodel Freja Beha Erichsen — who has worked for top designers including Chanel — flew the flag by confirming that she, too, is gay, after a stunning photograph of her sharing a kiss with a fellow model circulated online. But all these sexuality role models aside, I think the ultimate icon for young women searching for their own sexual identity today is Beth Ditto: a lesbian and proud of it, her out and loud attitude makes her an inspiration to any woman, gay or not.

Television’s Mary Portas, previously married to a man for 13 years, and her journalist partner Melanie Rickey have recently announced they are expecting a baby — proving it is never too late to come out. And the Queen of Shops is not the only girl on television who likes girls: BBC3 drama series Lip Service, which follows a group of lesbians in Glasgow, returns to our screens on Saturday evening for its second series.

Hailed as the British answer to gay American series The L Word, it is essential watching for any sexuality questioning/experimenting women, if only to have something to talk about in gay bars.

And it’s no coincidence that the coolest bars around London right now happen to be those which are filled with girls kissing girls, and boys kissing boys. Or, indeed, girls and boys who may or may not actually be girls or boys.

Symbol of androgyny Janelle Monáe, who is deliberately vague about her sexuality but undeniably loved by the gay scene, would not look out of place at Dalston Superstore on a lesbian night, such as Twat Boutique or the brand new Club Lesley. Candy Bar in Soho, London’s best-known lesbian bar, is also further famed by its own reality show, Candy Bar Girls. While I can’t say it made great television, if Rihanna and Jessie J are your sexual role models, then it’s worth a visit.

In an interview with US Glamour magazine earlier this month, Jessie J said “sexuality shouldn’t define you”, so why define your sexuality? With out-and-proud gay, bi and experimental girls all over our newspapers and televisions, and indeed, all over London, there are no excuses not be with whoever you want and forget the labels. Believe me, freedom is a wonderful thing. If only the bisexual men in the media would catch up with the girls.

Source: This Is London.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 7:06 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
The drought is over! Rihanna enjoys her 'first date in two years'... with a GIRL
By Sarah Bull
20 April 2012

She's always been very vocal about how much her closest friends mean to her.

But as Rihanna headed out with best friend Melissa Forde last night, the pair are more than just friends when the singer wrote on her Twitter page that she was on her 'first date in two years'. The 24-year-old later added: '#datenight my lover for the night @mforde11.'

Image
The drought is over! Last night Rihanna headed out on her first date in two years, with female friend Melissa Forde

Image
Like what you see? Rihanna also tweeted a picture of her sexy suspender tights

As the pair headed out for dinner at the Giorgio Baladi restaurant in Santa Monica, before moving on to The Roxbury Nightclub, Rihanna wore a relatively modest white shirt dress with a pair of sexy Pretty Polly suspender tights. As the singer walked along, her shirt dress fell open on her leg - revealing the black nylons with red detailing underneath. Rihanna paired the outfit with a pair of black stiletto heels as she dined at the Giorgio Baldi restaurant.

Image
More than friends? The pair sparked rumours about their relationship as they put on an affectionate display while heading home from their evening out

Later in the evening, Rihanna added, somewhat cryptically on her Twitter page, added: 'Beautiful is great, submissive is even better. 'Bawse b***h who's submissive yet the captain of the ship n HONEST...#priceless #marryME.'

It's not the first time Rihanna has found herself at the centre of claims about her sexuality. In 2011, it emerged that the singer had apparently had a lesbian relationship with model Natasha Burton, who revealed the affair in her book Low Down Dirty Shame. Talking about the relationship, Natasha wrote: 'I wasn’t sure I could take her serious, so I took it one day at a time. We instantly had a connection. I could listen to her for hours, discuss media, music and fashion.'

Meanwhile, Cee Lo Green also said that when he toured with her he noticed that she had a huge lesbian following. He said: 'Let me be specific. Rihanna has a large lesbian community that comes out to see her shows. 'Cause she does a lot of girl-on-girl kind of stuff. It's very racy and sexually charged. And I like that. I like aggressive and sexually liberated women. It's hot to me.'

Image
What's going on here? Rihanna later posted a picture of herself and a group of people

The last person Rihanna was romantically linked to was actor Ashton Kutcher, after she was apparently seen leaving Ashton's house in the early hours of the morning last month. Since then, Rihanna has refused to comment on the reports, labelling the question 'disappointing' when she was asked about the romance while promoting her movie Battleship in London. She instead answered: 'I am happy and I’m single, if that is what you are asking.'



Source: Daily Mail UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2012 9:16 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
America's first female astronaut comes out in her obituary

America's first female astronaut has posthumously revealed she was gay in an obituary posted on her website after she lost a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer.

Image
Sally Ride, America’s first female astronaut to enter space Photo: Rex Features

by Mark Hughes and Amy Willis
24 July 2012

Sally Ride died on Monday at the age of 61. In an obituary posted on her website shortly after her death, it was revealed that she is survived by Tam O'Shaughnessy, her partner of nearly 30 years. The pair met while playing tennis when they were 12 years old and stayed in contact as Dr Ride became an astronaut and Dr O'Shaughnessy became a professional tennis player. Both later earned doctorate science degrees.

Dr Ride's sister, Bear Ride, and a spokesman for Sally Ride Science, the organisation led by Dr Ride and Dr O'Shaughnessy, later reportedly confirmed that the astronaut – who was once married – was gay. "I hope it makes it easier for kids growing up gay that they know that another one of their heroes was like them," Dr Ride's sister told the BuzzFeed news website. Dr Ride was 32 when in 1983 she became the first American woman to fly to space alongside four other crew members.

The five astronauts flew aboard Challenger, the ill-fated space shuttle which exploded in Cape Canaveral 73 seconds after take-off three years later. A year after her first voyage she successfully returned to space in the same shuttle for an eight-day mission. She was training for a third mission when disaster struck the Challenger shuttle at the Kennedy Space Centre in 1986 and the programme was suspended. Six of her colleagues died in the disaster and Dr Ride, a star physicist who was accepted onto the space programme in 1978 after answering an advertisement for astronauts in a newspaper, was a member of the team that investigated the incident.

Charles Bolden, a former astronaut who is now the administrator of Nasa, said she would be missed but "her star will always shine brightly". "Sally Ride broke barriers with grace and professionalism – and literally changed the face of America's space programme," he added.

Dr Ride married fellow astronaut Steven Hawley in 1982 but the marriage ended in 1987.

Source: Telegraph UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Famous lesbians
PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:32 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Jodie Foster comes out as gay at Golden Globes
14 January 2013



(Reuters) - Hollywood actress Jodie Foster confirmed long-running speculation that she is gay by coming out at the Golden Globes awards on Sunday, but joked she wouldn't be holding a news conference to discuss her private life.

The notoriously private Foster stunned the audience of stars and Hollywood powerbrokers as she accepted a life-time achievement awarded by announcing she was now single.

"Seriously, I hope that you're not disappointed that there won't be a big-coming-out speech tonight," she said, "because I already did my coming out about a thousand years ago back in the Stone Age." Foster said she had always been up front with trusted friends and family about her sexual orientation. "But now apparently, I'm told that every celebrity is expected to honor the details of their private life with a press conference ... that's just not me," she said.

Foster, 50, then talked to her "ex-partner in love" Cydney Bernard, from whom she recently split, and their two sons in the audience. "Thank you Cyd, I am so proud of our modern family, our amazing sons," Foster said.

Over the years, Foster had come under withering criticism from the gay community for not publicly recognizing she was gay. The two-time best actress Oscar winner for "The Silence of the Lambs" and "The Accused" said she had valued her privacy because of her early acting career, which started at the age of three. "If you had been a public figure from the time that you were a toddler, if you'd had to fight for a life that felt real and honest and normal against all odds, then maybe you, too, might value privacy above all else," she said.

(Reporting by Piya Sinha-Roy and Mary Milliken; Editing by Jon Boyle)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group