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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 5:46 pm 
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The vaginal orgasm doesn't exist - it's the clitoris that holds the key to female pleasure, study claims
By Madlen Davies
8 October 2014

For years, women have often declared they can either orgasm through sex or foreplay.

But new research suggests we may all have been wrong. For there is no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, a clitoral orgasm or even a G-spot, new research claims. Instead, the umbrella term 'female orgasm' should be used, the study authors argue.

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Most women worldwide do not orgasm during penetrative sex as the vaginal orgasm doesn't exist, a review found. Researchers say women have been labelled with sexual problems based on this 'myth'

They maintain that like 'male orgasm', 'female orgasm' is the correct term. Historically, it was believed that women could orgasm through penetrative sex, and that G-spot, vaginal or clitoral orgasms were all different types of orgasm. But writing in the journal Clinical Anatomy, the authors say the majority of women worldwide do not have orgasms during penetrative sex. As a result, women have been labelled with sexual problems that are based on something that doesn’t exist: the vaginal orgasm.

The clitoris is the key to all female orgasms, the review found. The clitoris, is the human female’s most erogenous zone, often called the ‘female penis’ because it is made from the same material as the male penis. It is possible for all women to orgasm if the female erectile organs are effectively stimulated, the researchers added. The female erectile organs include the clitoris, the vestibular bulbs – also known as the clitoral bulbs – which are found on either side of the opening of the vagina and the pars intermedia, a thin band that joins the two vestibular bulbs.

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The size and distance of the clitoris from the vagina is paramount as to whether a woman can achieve orgasm, according to U.S. researchers who scanned the pelvic areas of 30 women as part of a study

Other erectile organs include the labia minora – known as the inner lips of the vagina - and the corpus spongiosum of the female urethra – the mass of spongy tissue surrounding the urethra, the tube that connects the bladder to an external opening just above the opening of the vagina.

The review's co author, Dr Vincenzo Puppo, who calls himself a sexologist, said: 'Male ejaculation does not automatically mean the end of sex for women. 'Touching and kissing can be continued almost indefinitely, and noncoital sexual acts after male ejaculation can be used to produce orgasm in women.'

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All women can orgasm if female erectile tissue including the clitoris is stimulated, experts said

The review, published in the journal Clinical Anatomy, comes after a U.S. study published earlier this year found that the size of a woman’s clitoris can impact their ability to have an orgasm. In women who have orgasm problems, the clitoris is smaller and located farther from the vagina, the study found. The researchers said their findings could lead to new treatments for women suffering from anorgasmia, who are unable to have orgasms.

Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the pelvic area of 30 women who were on average 32 years old. Ten of the women had reported rarely or never achieving orgasms despite trying, while the rest had a normal experience during sex. The women who had problems achieving orgasm tended to have smaller clitoris' located further away from the vagina.

Researchers said that although orgasm is complex, the size and location of the clitoris may be paramount. The clitoral complex, which has a shape of a boomerang, extends under the skin and includes parts that are known as the body, crura, bulb and root. It is possible that a smaller distance between these structures and the vagina makes it easier for the clitoris to be stimulated during intercourse.

The study was published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine in February this year.

Source: Daily Mail UK.

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 3:01 pm 
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The science behind female ejaculation
by James Sherlock
Monday, 19 January 2015

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Fair warning, this article will make reference to squirting, gushing and the G-spot.

Now that’s out of the way, let’s have a candid discussion about female ejaculation. While pornography featuring female ejaculation has been banned in the UK, it represents the third most searched category in Australia and has been a consistent point of curiosity throughout history. Many of you may be surprised to learn that females are capable of ejaculation, however, the phenomena has been written about from as early as 4 Century China, where the liquids excreted during orgasm were believed to be imbued with mystical and healthful properties.

As it turns out, during orgasm some women (10-40 per cent) experience the involuntary emission of fluid ranging from 30 to 150mL. This has become known colloquially as squirting, though this usually refers to a larger amount of liquid being excreted. In the Western world, great minds like Aristotle and Hippocrates have pondered the origins of ‘female sperm’ and ‘female discharge’ but the earliest approximations of scientific investigation were some rudimentary physiological descriptions appearing in everyone’s favourite bed-time read, the Kama Sutra. In the following centuries, female ejaculation continued to fascinate but it was not until the early 1900’s that any real progress was made in working out the source of this mysterious discharge.

In 1904, psychologist Havelock Ellis proposed that female ejaculation was analogous to semen and originated from the Bartholin glands (two pea-sized glands responsible for secreting mucous which lubricates the vagina). Almost 50 years later, Ernest Gräfenberg opposed this view by arguing that female ejaculation had little to do with lubrication. He came to this conclusion by observing women masturbate, noting that ejaculation occurred more frequently with palpation of an erogenous zone on the front wall of the vagina which became later known as the G-spot.

Interestingly, ancient descriptions of this erogenous zone closely match Gräfenberg’s centuries later work. It was Gräfenberg’s contention that female ejaculation was secretion from intraurethral glands located underneath the G-spot. It was not, Gräfenberg was adamant, urine, which was the leading alternative hypothesis at the time.

One man’s opinion is far from conclusive and in 1982 researchers undertook chemical analysis of female ejaculate and a clearer picture began to form. This landmark study demonstrated a clear difference between the liquid excreted during orgasm and urine, a finding that was later confirmed by several independent scientific studies. From these results, it was posited that female ejaculate originated from the Skene’s glands: the equivalent of a female prostate.

Yet the scientific community remains divided, some questioning the very existence of the G-spot while others question the vast differences in the amount of fluid expressed by women. Some women report very little liquid (2-4mL) resembling watered-down milk, while others express far greater volume. This has led some researchers to maintain that squirting is actually an involuntary emission of urine, or hyper lubrication. A recent study published out of Le Chesnay, France conducted by Samuel Salama and his colleagues sought to lay these questions to rest by combining ultra-sound imaging with chemical analysis of higher volume female ejaculate.

The researchers recruited seven women who self-reported that they squirted the equivalent to a glass of water during orgasm, enough to noticeably wet the bed-sheets. The women provided a urine sample, and then underwent an ultrasound that confirmed that their bladders were indeed empty. The women then, either with the help of their partner or alone, began sexual stimulation and once sufficiently aroused underwent a second ultrasound. At this point, the women returned to the task at hand until they achieved orgasm and ejaculation. A sample of the ejaculate was collected and the final ultrasound performed.

Unsurprisingly, the first ultrasound showed that participants’ bladders had emptied. However, the second ultrasound, conducted when the women were close to orgasm, showed significant bladder filling. The final ultrasound once more showed that the women’s bladders were empty. This suggested that female ejaculation, at least for these women, was largely urine.

Biochemical analysis of the fluid showed that this was definitely the case for two of the women in the study. For the other five, the analysis showed that the fluid was largely urine but it also contained prostate-specific androgen (PSA) originating from the Skene’s glands. The authors of the study concluded that these results strongly support the hypothesis that female ejaculation is an involuntary urine emission. The presence of PSA was ruled to be residue of ‘true’ female ejaculation.

So is ‘squirting’ just pee? Yes and no. It seems that larger volume fluid emissions, or squirting, are for the most part urine. However, there does appear to be evidence that a smaller volume of fluid is actually female prostate secretion due to mechanical stimulation of the G-spot. Whether this constitutes ‘true’ female ejaculation remains to be seen as most previous studies include all ranges of fluid emission. Further, it is unknown conclusively whether these two forms of excretion are mutually exclusive, or whether there is some overlap as suggested by the presence of PSA in the urine of women in this study. Likely, women who are capable of ejaculation naturally vary in the amount of fluid they excrete.

The implications for personal and sexual health are also unclear. An international survey of women who were capable of ejaculating found that four of five reported that squirting was enriching to their sexual lives. However, this included any volume of fluid emission. Squirting generally results from a combination of stimulation of the G-spot, relaxation and a comfortable emotional state and can occur without any larger implications of disease, and may be an indicator of a healthy sexual relationship.

The only clear conclusion that the researchers draw from this latest study is a recommendation to urinate frequently before and during sexual activity if squirting presents a problem. Other than that, stay hydrated and have fun.

Source: Independent UK.

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:28 pm 
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After lobbying push, drugmaker resubmits women's sex pill
By MATTHEW PERRONE
February 17, 2015

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The makers of a twice-rejected pill designed to boost sexual desire in women are hoping a yearlong lobbying push by politicians, women's groups and consumer advocates will move their much-debated drug onto the market.

The ongoing saga of Sprout Pharmaceutical's female libido drug illustrates the complicated politics and unresolved science surrounding women's sexuality.

For decades, drugmakers have tried unsuccessfully to develop a female equivalent to Viagra, the blockbuster drug that treats men's erectile dysfunction drug by increasing blood flow. But disorders of women's sexual desire have proven resistant to drugs that act on blood flow, hormones and other simple biological functions.

Supporters of Sprout's drug say women's sexual disorders have been overlooked for too long by regulators at the Food and Drug Administration. But critics argue that women's sexuality is too complex to be addressed by a single pill.

Sprout's drug flibanserin is the first attempt to increase libido by acting on brain chemicals linked to appetite and mood. But the Food and Drug Administration has already twice rejected the drug because of lackluster effectiveness and side effects including fatigue, dizziness and nausea.

In an effort to break the regulatory logjam, groups sponsored by Sprout and other drugmakers have begun publicizing the lack of a "female Viagra" as a women's rights issue.

"Women deserve equal treatment when it comes to sex," states an online petition to the FDA organized by one such group, Even the Score, which garnered almost 25,000 supporters. The group's corporate backers include Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Palatin Technologies and Trimel Pharmaceuticals - all companies developing drugs to treat female sexual disorders. A spokeswoman for Blue Engine Media, the public relations group for Even the Score, declined to disclose how much of the group's funding comes from companies. The group's nonprofit supporters include the Women's Health Foundation, the Institute for Sexual Medicine and other organizations.

Drugmakers frequently cite a 1999 survey in the Journal of the American Medical Association that found 43 percent of U.S. women had some type of sexual dysfunction.

Sprout said Tuesday it is refiling its application for flibanserin, adding new information requested by the FDA about how the pill affects driving ability. FDA scientists requested that data after their most recent rejection of the drug, in part, due to results showing nearly 10 percent of women in company trials reported sleepiness as a side effect.

The FDA first rejected flibanserin in 2010 after a panel of expert advisers unanimously voted against the drug, saying its benefits did not outweigh its risks. The drug's initial developer, Boehringer Ingelheim, abandoned work on the drug in 2011 and sold it to Sprout, a startup headed by a husband-and-wife team from Raleigh, North Carolina.

Sprout resubmitted the drug with additional effectiveness and safety data, but the FDA again rejected the drug in October 2013. After Sprout filed a formal dispute over the decision, FDA regulators requested the driving study and other details on the drug's interactions with other medications.

As Sprout gathered that data, the company also enlisted support from influential allies in Washington and beyond. Last January four members of Congress, including Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Florida, sent a letter to the FDA, urging a careful reassessment of the drug and lamenting the lack of drug options for low female libido.

"There are 24 approved medical treatments for male sexual dysfunction and not one single treatment yet approved for the most common form of female sexual dysfunction," states the letter, which was also signed by Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-New York, and two other Democratic congresswomen.

The talking point about the imbalance of drugs for men versus women was picked up by a coalition of seven women's and consumer health groups who met with the FDA early last year.

"We see this not only as an important unmet women's health issue, but an inflection point for the agency to ensure that similar standards are applied for drug approvals in conditions uniquely affecting women," states a follow-up letter to the agency from leaders of the National Organization for Women, the National Consumers League and four other groups.

Then last October the FDA held a two-day meeting at its headquarters to get public input on the problem of female sexual dysfunction and the challenge of developing treatments.

If approved, flibanserin would be labeled for premenopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, described as a lack of sexual appetite that causes emotional distress. Because so many factors affect female sexual appetite, there are a number of other possible causes doctors must rule out before diagnosing the condition, including relationship problems, hormone disorders, depression and mood issues caused by other drugs like sleeping aids and pain medications.

Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2015 4:25 pm 
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When Women Pursue Sex, Even Men Don’t Get It
By Ann Friedman
4 June 2013

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Photo: Daniel Schoenen/Corbis

I’ve never been one of those people who sees the humanity in all animals.

I don’t share whimsical sloth pictures on Tumblr or insist that a dog is “really connecting” with me or try to psychoanalyze my friend’s cat’s behavior. But when I read Daniel Bergner’s description of rat clitorises — one of the more fascinating sections of his totally engrossing new book, What Do Women Want?: Adventures in the Science of Female Desire, out this week — for once I felt a serious connection with the animal kingdom.

Here are some facts about female lab rats: During sex, a female rat will evade her partner, darting away in the midst of his pumping, so it doesn’t end too quickly — she wants it to last, because it’s more pleasurable for her that way. It’s not clear whether they orgasm, but “female rats do what feels good,” a researcher explains. When graduate students stroke female rats’ clitorises (which apparently look like little eraser heads) and then stop, the rats will tug on the students’ sleeves and beg for more. “This,” writes Bergner, “went on and on.” No research yet on how the situation is exacerbated if the female rat has had a really tough week at work.

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Camels Photo: Ed Darack/Corbis

Female animals don’t just enjoy sex, they are not shy about pursuing it. Bergner’s new book is a reexamination of everything we think we know about sex and female biology. An excerpt in The New York Times Magazine two weeks ago explained how, contrary to long-standing cultural beliefs that women are turned on by stability and emotional intimacy, long-term monogamy actually saps women’s sex drives. A German researcher “shows women and men in new relationships reporting, on average, more or less equal lust for each other. But for women who’ve been with their partners between one and four years, a dive begins — and continues, leaving male desire far higher.” We fundamentally misunderstand women’s lust, says Bergner. And not just when it comes to married women.

Bergner explains that, in the past, “scientists fixated on what the rat female did in the act of sex, not what she did to get there.” And if you’re friends with any single women or are one yourself, you know that “what she did to get there” is often the most taxing part of the sexual act. It’s also where cultural factors really start to work against women’s newly documented desire. Bergner makes a pretty strong case that women are socially, not biologically, discouraged from initiating and enjoying sex. (You think those female rats are compelling? I had to take a walk around the block after reading about female rhesus monkeys. Game recognize game.) Men and women have been barraged with the message that women are not naughty by nature. They are thought of as hardwired to hunt for a partner and a mate, while men pursue sex as a pleasurable act in and of itself. It follows from there that women — at least good women — must be pursued and coaxed into sex, and men enjoy the thrill of the chase.

In one small study of college students, 93 percent of women said they preferred to be asked out, while 83 percent of men preferred to do the asking. An oft-cited 1989 study of university students found that men were far more receptive than women to direct offers of casual sex. During the early aughts panic about the prevalence of campus hookups, many socially conservative experts alleged that women didn’t really want all that casual sex they were having. But a University of Michigan researcher found in 2011 that “gender differences are minimized when women feel that they can avoid being stigmatized for their behavior.” Women like having sex. They don’t like being socially punished for it.

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Garden beetles Photo: Erhard Nerger/Corbis

There are other factors propping up the idea that women prefer to be sexually passive. Bergner reports that preliminary research indicates women are most turned on by their partners' desire for them. It's easy to see how this could be misconstrued as passivity — especially because more than a century of conventional wisdom says women don’t like sex as much as men do. But if we accept Bergner’s radical thesis that women do, in fact, like to get off, and get off on being desired, the question of who pursues whom poses a real conundrum for single women.

Think about it: Women want sex, and in particular, they want sex with people who really want them. But socially, many straight men still find it a turnoff when women are sexual aggressors. Which means that, for women, aggressively pursuing the thing they want actually leads to them not getting it. I suspect this is the source of much sexual dissatisfaction of the modern single lady, who's so horny she's running across the street to Walgreens to buy more batteries twice a week, but is unable to pick up men despite social conventions that men are "easy" to bed and women have to be coaxed into casual sex. The thing women are told they can access any time is, maddeningly, often just out of reach.

Even in research about appropriate dating behavior among adults today, “men and women both agree that men should actively pursue female partners and that women should be passive recipients to their advances,” says Jessica Carbino, a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UCLA who studies online dating and relationships. “For example, women and men overwhelmingly state that men are supposed to plan dates, ask out the woman, and pick her up. Moreover, when women do not adhere to these scripts they are viewed negatively. For example, women who initiate dates are viewed by men as more promiscuous and not interested in forming a serious relationship.” If the rats are any indication, maybe they aren’t! We’ve already established that females of all species are interested in sex for pleasure. But in the human realm, that simple, fundamental motivation is all too easily labeled as “sluttiness,” or some sort of deep desperation wrought by singledom.

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Ostriches Photo: Michel Denis-Huot/Corbis

This catch-22 presents women with a few options, none of which are appealing. You can directly pursue a man, but only if you want to convey that you’re only in it for sex. You can choose not to pursue him, but then you’re relegated to this historic, passive role that doesn’t jibe with your active, considered approach to any other area of life, be it work or real estate or even friendship. Carbino sees this tension in her own research. “According to these women, their professional background is already intimidating to many men and they feel as though asking them out would make them less attractive and even more intimidating,” she says. “The men I interview also state that they prefer to be the individual who initiates the date and at times find women who ask them out to be more aggressive.”

Women aren’t the only ones experiencing some cognitive dissonance between their animalistic urges and the social conventions of dating. “More and more men are finding it difficult to be as direct, when it comes to dating and sex, as previous generations of men maybe once were,” says Chiara Atik, author of Modern Dating: A Field Guide. We all get that the rules of traditional courtship — in which men make every single advance and women demur or acquiesce — are dead, but we haven’t replaced them with a new standard operating procedure. “Everyone's being kind of wishy-washy,” Atik says. “Women want sex, but they don't want to be seen as forward (or worse, desperate). Men want sex but are intimidated, unconfident, or don't want to be seen as domineering. We're not sure who should be the sexual instigators, and then no one really steps up to the plate.”

Here, again, perhaps the animal kingdom can be a source of inspiration. Sex for pleasure: Lady birds do it, lady bees do it, and, I’m sure by dint of their socioeconomic status and feminism 101 classes, even educated lady fleas do it. The sooner we can agree that pleasure is one major motivation to pursue sex — for both men and women — the sooner we can all start instigating it.

Source: NY Mag.

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2015 6:58 pm 
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Most women have lived out their sexual fantasies, survey shows
by Kashmira Gander
Thursday, 7 May 2015

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A couple kiss near the shore of El Yaque Beach, Nueva Esparta state, Margarita Island, Venezuela on January 31, 2014.
LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images

The results of a sex survey are busting the myth that Britons are sexually repressed, by revealing how the majority of women have lived out their sexual fantasies.

As many as 81 per cent of women and 77 per cent of men have shared and acted out fantasies with a partner – with having sex in public topping the list of turn-ons. The study also laid bare the influence of TV and film on our desires, with three-quarters of couples saying they had inspired them.

Meanwhile, a further three quarters of women and over half of men have played out a fantasy they’d found in a book, with 68 per cent of women and 63 per cent of men re-enacting their sexual dreams. In the survey of 1,300 people by online sex toy firm Lovehoney, being tied up grabbed the imagination of 72 per cent of participants.

Just over half said they were turned on by domination and submission, 48 per cent weren’t put off by the idea of having their escapades filmed in a sex tape, and a quarter said they found the idea of joining the mile high club and copping off on a plane sexy.

When fetishes were considered, 60 per cent of couples said they liked to indulge in bondage, which was followed by over half saying they enjoyed role play and dressing up. A particularly hands on 28 per cent of adults surveyed said they enjoyed biting partners, but 26 per cent took the opposite approach and admitted voyeurism was their fetish of choice.

However, the study also exposed how despite the rise of 50 Shades of Grey and online porn, around 60 per cent of both sexes said they were embarrassed by their fantasies, although most would tell their partners. And those surveyed, 91 per cent said they had a fantasy, while a further 97 per cent say confessing your fantasies can enhance sexual happiness. But around 60 per cent of men and women expressed concerns that fantasies can create unrealistic sexual expectiations.

Lovehoney co-owner said Richard Longhurst: "Obviously many of us are a little embarrassed about our sexual fantasies, but it is great that we are still sharing them with partners despite the embarrassment."

Source: Independent UK.

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 3:49 am 
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Women are buying more sex than ever before, new research claims
by Rose Troup Buchanan
Saturday, 23 May 2015

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Women are buying more sex than ever before, according to new research.

The initial findings, part of research project ‘Women Who Buy Sexual Services in the UK’, found that women who pay for sex come from all ages, backgrounds and it appears that one of the main reason for the transaction is they lack the time for a relationship.

Researchers at Lancaster University and Manchester Metropolitan University spoke to 21 escorts and are now seeking female customers to continue their study. Female profiles rose from 11,056 to 28,614 over the same period.

The pair hope that the study, jointly funded by the British Academy and The Leverhulme Trust, will challenge present policy on prostitution, as well as providing a needed insight into the women who purchase sex.

Dr Kingston said: “We have made some fascinating early findings, but we still have much work to do. We are seeking to explore motivations and experiences of women who book escorts; who and where they buy sex from and to explore how physical and sexual safety is negotiated.”

Source: Independent UK.

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 Post subject: Re: Women and sex
PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2015 3:37 am 
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Swedish women get new word for solo sex act
by Maddy Savage
17 June 2015

After months of stimulating debate in Sweden, a gender equality group has voted on a new word for female masturbation, which it now wants to enter the Swedish dictionary.

Members of the Swedish Association for Sexuality Equality (RFSU) selected "klittra" from a shortlist of words put together after launching a national competition last year. The group said it wanted to encourage a single, nationally-recognized word for the activity after noting the absence of such a term in Swedish, while there are numerous words that directly refer to men having solo sex.

News of the planned contest went global when it was first launched November 2014 and the organization received more than 1,200 emails, comments, postcards and letters, and around 200 unique word suggestions. It later published a shortlist of 40 words for the public to vote on, with "klittra" proving the most successful and "pulla" and "runka" the next popular alternatives.

The RFSU's final decision to promote the word "klittra" was reached following a poll at an RFSU conference in Västerås, north east of Stockholm, over the weekend, and gained prominence in the Swedish media on Wednesday. "Historically, women's sexuality and not least female masturbation has been taboo," the RFSU said in a statement. "Women are not expected to have desires and be turned on in the same way as men, which is reflected in the lack of words [for masturbation]," it added. The statement noted that one advantage of "klittra" is that it "highlights the importance of the clitoris for pleasure".

RFSU is already starting to campaign for the word to be included in the next edition of Sweden's official dictionary (Svenska Akademiens ordlista or SAOL). "Now RFSU members have had their say, the obvious word for female masturbation is klittra. Now we hope that the public begins to use the word so that it is only a matter of time until we see it in SAOL," said RFSU's spokesperson Kristina Ljungros.

Ljungros has previously told The Local that more needs to be done to encourage Swedes to discuss female sexuality. "We are trying to put sexuality on the agenda - the positive aspects, not just the negative ones like sexual abuse. We want to focus on the good parts, the lust," she said. "When it comes to masturbation, people mostly think about just men doing it and we don't think of it as common for women. If we don't have a word in the language, how can we even talk about it?"

Source: The Local Sweden.

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