TalkAboutSexxx.com

Sex and sexuality news and information forum

 forum - business directory - image gallery

It is currently Thu Jul 19, 2018 3:48 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:04 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
The duchess, her doctor and his electric bed

A new book tells the tale of Dr James Graham whose sex clinic rocked 18th-century society

* Vanessa Thorpe, arts and media correspondent
* The Observer,
* Sunday September 14 2008

Image
Georgina, Duchess of Devonshire, the 18th-century aristocrat played by Keira Knightley in her latest film, The Duchess, was treated at London's first sex clinic, a book published this month will reveal.

Devastated by her failure to provide a male heir for an unloving husband, Georgiana, who was the society It Girl of her day, was introduced to the pioneering Dr James Graham by her mother, Lady Spencer. After enduring a series of unlikely procedures, such as repeated ice cold champagne douches, the duchess was persuaded to lie with her feet above her head after sexual intercourse.

The neglected wife, gambling addict and political campaigner was among a number of influential men and women who visited Graham's extraordinary therapeutic establishment.

The story of the rise and fall of a man who also notoriously launched the society career of the adventuress Lady Emma Hamilton, the great love of Admiral Lord Nelson, is told for the first time in Doctor of Love, Lydia Syson's biography of Graham.

The young Lady Hamilton, or plain Emy Lyon from north Wales as she was then, was picked up by the Scottish doctor on the streets near his clinic, known as the Temple of Health, at the Adelphi, off the Strand in London. She had been plying her trade as a prostitute.

Lyon was quickly installed in Graham's temple as Hebe Vestina, the Rosy Goddess of Youth and Health, and instructed in a series of poses that represented the ideal of the fruitful woman. Dressed in Grecian sandals and flowing garments, it was here she was first spotted by her future husband, the ageing diplomat, William Hamilton, and her place in high society was secured.

Graham's lavish erotic therapy centre, complete with celestial bed, became one of the most fashionable destinations for the aristocracy of the day. It promised increased sexual pleasure and fertility through a series of electrical pulses and intoxicating aromas. And it cost £50.

Although an ardent supporter of Graham, Georgiana's mother chronicled the treatment her daughter received in astonished tones. She had 'every night and morning, I believe for several months to pour a whole large flask of the same water, or of the Champagne wine, cooled in ice, into and upon the fountain of life!'.

Such quirky practices made Graham and his patients, who often arrived at the temple disguised by masks or veils, the targets of popular ridicule.

The Yorkshire poet William Mason had fun at their expense, writing:

'... thither haste with knocking knees;
Genial and prolific fires,
Shall wake your pulse to new desires;
Tho' your embers should be dead,
Stretch on his celestial bed;
Soon you'll feel the vital flame,
Rushing thro' your icey frame!'


Another celebrity visitor to the temple was the actress Mary Robinson. At the time Robinson was known throughout England as Perdita, a nickname that came from the character she had played in a production of Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. The 17-year-old Prince of Wales had seen her in the role in 1779 and promptly made her his mistress.

Robinson visited Graham, it is now believed, in a last-ditch attempt to become pregnant and so claim some living from the royal purse.

Like Georgiana, she benefited from treatments such as the celestial bed, which was tilted up at the feet end to promote conception. It is a medically unproved theory, but one still in currency. It was recently hailed as more effective than IVF by Cuban-American singer Gloria Estefan, who claimed she had passed on the tip to rock queen Madonna after hearing it first from the late former TV presenter Paula Yates, a mother of four children.

Born in Edinburgh in 1745, Graham travelled to America after training in medicine and learned about electricity from the scientist Ebenezer Kinnersley, a close associate of Benjamin Franklin. He immediately began work on a prototype of the celestial bed.

In 1781, Graham moved his temple to new premises in Pall Mall, big enough to house an improved bed. This canopied contraption was 12ft by 9ft, covered with clockwork musical figures and adorned with a cage containing turtle doves. The movements of the occupants of the bed set off music through organ pipes which sounded with increasing tempo as their encounter went on.

Towards the end of his life Graham became obsessed with a new therapy called earthbathing which involved being buried up to the neck in soil. He underwent a series of religious revelations too, some leading him into mania.

Before he died in Edinburgh in 1794 he had begun to experiment with the idea of fasting to prolong his life.

Source: The Observer UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2009 3:30 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Biography of last Chinese eunuch reveals a tumultuous life
By Barbara Demick
March 6, 2009

Image
Sun Yaoting and his biographer, Jia Yinghua. In his final years, Sun was recognized as a rare living repository of history.

Castrated at 8, Sun Yaoting hoped for an imperial life of riches. Instead, he experienced palace intrigue, war, revolution, scorn and, finally, recognition.

Reporting from Beijing -- Sun Yaoting was 8 when his father castrated him with a single swoop of a razor. The year was 1911, and China was in turmoil. Just a few months later rebels deposed the emperor, overturned centuries of tradition and established a republic.

"Our boy has suffered for nothing," his father said, weeping and beating his breast, when he learned that the emperor had been overthrown. "They don't need eunuchs anymore!"

Little did he know that the child nevertheless would earn a place in Chinese history. The imperial court was resuscitated long enough to give Sun a chance to serve the wife of the boy emperor Puyi -- a position that gave him the distinction of being the last eunuch to the last Chinese emperor.

After the Communists came to power in 1949, Sun and other surviving eunuchs were despised as freakish symbols of the feudal past. He was nearly killed during the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s, and his siblings were so fearful of persecution that they threw away his bao, or treasure: the severed genitals that eunuchs kept pickled in a jar so they could be buried as complete men.

It was not until the final years of his life that Sun was recognized as a rare living repository of history. A biography based on hours of interviews in the years before his death in 1996 was recently translated into English. The book arrives as a museum dedicated to eunuchs, built around the tomb of a 16th century eunuch, is undergoing a major expansion. It is scheduled to reopen in May.

Whether the interest is prurient or scholarly, the curiosity is definitely there.

Emasculation was thought to render eunuchs nonpersons, without ambition or ego, so their presence in the innermost sanctum of the imperial palace did not violate the emperor's privacy.

"The eunuchs were very mysterious and in some ways more interesting than the emperors themselves," said Jia Yinghua, Sun's biographer. Jia met Sun when he was researching a book about Puyi, and recorded 100 hours of conversations with him.

The biography, "The Last Eunuch of China: The Life of Sun Yaoting," contains everything you might want to know about the gruesome particulars of becoming a eunuch, along with much you probably would not want to know.

Suffice it to say the boys went through excruciating pain without benefit of anesthesia (other than chile peppers in some cases). In addition to a lifetime of impotence, they often suffered incontinence in exchange for entry to the palace.

Sun was unusual: Inspired by an older eunuch from his village who had become rich, he decided for himself that he wanted to follow this path. But then the emperor was deposed and the castration had left him too weak for farm work.

The emperor retained the trappings of power in the Forbidden City, however. Sun came to Beijing at age 14, still wearing the pigtail of Chinese boys at the time. He got a job with one of the emperor's uncles, and later with Puyi's wife.

He followed the imperial family to Manchuria after Puyi was installed in 1932 as puppet emperor of a Japanese colonial state known as Manchukuo.

Sun was privy to the court's most intimate secrets, the opium addiction and out-of-wedlock pregnancy of the emperor's first wife, Wanrong, and the emperor's ambivalence about his own sexuality. Sun later told his biographer that Puyi was less interested in his wife than in a particular eunuch who "looked like a pretty girl with his tall, slim figure, handsome face and creamy white skin." He recalled that the two were "inseparable as body and shadow."

After the Communists came to power, many of the eunuchs became penniless outcasts. A few drowned themselves in the moats of the Forbidden City. Sun, one of the few who was literate, got a job as caretaker of a temple, where he lived until his death. The recollections of an adopted son and a grandson, together with the biography, make him one of the most documented eunuchs of modern times.

Scholars also will tell you about other eunuchs: Cai Lun was credited with inventing paper in AD 105. Zheng He became one of China's greatest explorers in the 15th century. But eunuchs are generally depicted in Chinese literature as conniving and greedy, the stock villains of many a palace intrigue.

The eunuch museum is in an overgrown cemetery with stone guardians and a tomb for the Ming dynasty eunuch Tian Yi, who died in 1602. Eunuchs were not permitted to be buried with their families, so several other favored eunuchs found their final resting place in Tian Yi's compound in the foothills of west Beijing.

Hidden behind what had been an elementary school, the tombs somehow escaped destruction during the Cultural Revolution and were opened to the public in 1999. The expanded museum is to display paintings of eunuchs, a photo collection about Sun's life and other 20th century eunuchs, and items such as the curved knives used to castrate them.

"The eunuchs are part of a long Chinese tradition that continues to this day in which the regular people had to do anything to serve the all-powerful central government," said Cui Weixing, a literary and cultural critic who has written about eunuchs.

"Maybe that's why the Chinese government isn't so anxious to publicize anything about eunuchs. But it is a good start that we'll have this museum so that people can begin to learn."

Source: Los Angeles Times.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 5:15 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Linda Lovelace dies in car crash
April 23, 2002
By JOE BOB BRIGGS

Image
Linda Lovelace in 1972

NEW YORK (UPI) -- Everything about the life of Linda Lovelace, who died Monday at age 53, was so, so sad.

She had been a prostitute, a drug abuser, and the star of some of the raunchiest porn movies ever made, back when the Mafia filmed them secretly in ratty New York apartments.

She stretched her 15 minutes of fame to 30 by converting to feminism and condemning pornography as "legalized rape," but there was never much conviction in anything she said or published. And yet there was a softness to her, and a gullibility, and a desperate desire to be loved and accepted, making her seem more like a confused girl from Yonkers than the leader of the porn revolution.

She was probably as stunned as everyone else when "Deep Throat" became the most famous and profitable smut movie in history, especially since it was little more than a down-and-dirty stag film shot in ratty Miami motel rooms. In the context of the tens of thousands of porn movies made both before and after, it ranks pretty close to the bottom in terms of cinematography, acting, entertainment value and just plain sexual thrills.

But "Deep Throat," strange as it may seem, changed America's sexual attitudes more than anything since the first Kinsey Report in 1948. It altered the lives of everyone associated with it. It super-charged the feminist movement. It gave the Mafia its most lucrative business since Prohibition. And it changed the nation's views of obscenity forever. We'll never know exactly how much money it made -- and continues to make -- but estimates have gone as high as $600 million, which would make it one of the most successful motion pictures of any kind in any country in the history of the world.

Image

Nations, like people, have moments when they just need to get drunk and party, and apparently something of the sort was happening in June 1972 when, at almost the same moment, the Watergate burglars broke into the offices of the Democratic National Committee and "Deep Throat" opened at the World Theater in New York City. "Deep Throat" was not just a dirty movie, it was a cause, and it was so popular that most film critics were afraid to deprecate it for fear of seeming unhip.

Ed McMahon, the sidekick of Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show," was such a fan of the movie that he showed up with six friends and a case of beer, then stood outside the theater afterward enthusing with the public.

Frank Sinatra was one of the early audience members, along with Vice President Spiro Agnew, Warren Beatty, Truman Capote, Shirley MacLaine, Nora Ephron, Bob Woodward and Sammy Davis Jr., who grew so enamored of Linda Lovelace that within the year he and his wife would be having group sex with her and her husband.

"Deep Throat" is finally one of those movies that really can't be explained. It was simply there at a certain crazy time, and it brought out every suppressed urge of a public starved for sensation. And Linda Lovelace was the ill-equipped starry-eyed girl at the center of that vortex.

Lovelace may be the only American celebrity to publish four best-selling autobiographies. The first two celebrate free uninhibited sex as the most liberating form of human expression since man learned to speak. The last two describe pornography as a felony assault against women, a menace to the future of civilization and the very essence of evil. In this one desperately unhappy woman we have both the yin and the yang of the sexual revolution played out before our eyes.

Linda Boreman -- her real name -- started down the road that would turn her into the world's most famous sexual performer on a day in 1969 when she was recuperating from a car accident at her parents' condo in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

She and her girlfriend were relaxing poolside in their bikinis -- despite scars all over Linda's body -- when a bar owner and sometime pimp named Chuck Traynor spotted her and offered the two girls a joint and a ride in his Jaguar. She was 21. He was 27. In a matter of weeks she had moved in with Traynor, and she soon found out that opposites truly attract. He was the rough and possessive type, part of the small-time criminal underworld; she was the protected daughter of a cop. She didn't know much about sex at the time, but Traynor said he would teach her, using hypnosis to increase her sexual appetite.

Lovelace had grown up in Yonkers, the daughter of a New York City cop and a domineering mother who believed in frequent corporal punishment. At Catholic school she got the nickname "Miss Holy Holy" because she wouldn't let boys touch her. When she was 16 her parents retired to Florida, and she finished high school there without making many new friends. She lost her virginity at age 19 and gave birth to a baby at 20. (She claims her mother tricked her into giving the baby up for adoption by having her sign papers she didn't read.) She returned to New York to enroll in computer school and was planning to open a boutique when a nasty car accident left her with a broken jaw, broken ribs and a lacerated liver. That's when Traynor walked into her life.

The hypnosis apparently worked, because within a few weeks Lovelace was turning tricks. Traynor owned a bar, the Vegas Inn in North Miami, but when business dropped off, he returned to pimping. In later years Lovelace would claim that she was a virtual prisoner during her prostitution years, 1969 to 1972, and that she was frequently beaten and threatened with a gun. The truth is difficult to determine, because Traynor freely admits beating her but says it was part of mutual sexual games, and that he did carry guns but he never threatened to use one on her. He also claims she could have left at any time. As late as 1974, Lovelace was declaring in public interviews that she loved Traynor.

Image

Traynor eventually married Lovelace -- according to her, so that she couldn't be forced to testify against him on drug charges. Both became habitual users of marijuana and methamphetamine, and Traynor increasingly came to think of her as his meal ticket.

Eventually he moved her to New York where he hoped to sell her services to the most famous madam of her day, Xaveria Hollander, the "Happy Hooker" herself. But Hollander turned her down as an employee, and it's not difficult to see why. Lovelace was not a particularly attractive woman, especially by the standards of the call-girl world. She had frizzy hair and a square mannish face; her breasts were fake, the result of illegal silicone injections she got in 1971, before implants had been invented. Her sole appeal, according to those who worked with her, was that her personality came off as winsome and girl-next-doorish. There was also a little bit of the hippie "free love" spirit about her.

Undeterred by Hollander's rejection, Traynor turned to the next best thing -- "loops." These were five-to-ten-minute filmed sex acts that were also known as stag films, smokers and peeps. They were all illegal, filmed secretly with 8-millimeter cameras in New York City apartments with anonymous actors, crews, and moneymen supplied by the Colombo crime family. Lovelace made dozens of these, most of them directed by a guy named Ted (Tom) Snyder, who wore cowboy hats, gold chains and a gold pinky ring with "Ted" spelled out in diamonds.

When Traynor and Lovelace met Snyder in 1970, he was working out of a filthy apartment on 48th Street, in the Times Square area, and frequently used an actor named Rob Everett as Lovelace's partner. Everett said Lovelace was not only a willing participant in the filming, but "She loved sex." Her fellow actors, responding later to charges that she was forced into the business, even went further to say that she loved prostitution, multiple partners, and especially any kind of rough sex.

Under Traynor's guidance, the loops got more and more freaky. Lovelace appeared in a bestiality loop that she would describe in one of her autobiographies as something she did at gunpoint. But the six people on the set that day were interviewed by film historian Jim Holliday, and all except Lovelace claim that she not only did it willingly, she seemed to enjoy it.

Traynor and Lovelace got their big break at a cocktail party for swingers where they met Gerard Damiano, a director of softcore porn who was casting hardcore scenes for a new movie called "Changes." Damiano was so impressed with Lovelace that he wrote a script especially for her. That script would become "Deep Throat," but first Damiano would have to convince his Mafia bosses to use her.

Louis "Butchie" Peraino was the Colombo associate who had to approve the budget for Damiano's "Deep Throat" script, and the 300-pound "Butchie" was not impressed at first by Lovelace. He knew her as the star of the "M" series of loops. He wanted Carol Connors, a big-breasted blonde, to play the lead in what was, for him, a major investment of his father's money. But he changed his mind when Damiano had Lovelace demonstrate her sexual technique for him.

Lovelace would be paid $1,200 to appear in the new film -- actually Traynor took the money -- which was titled "The Doctor Makes a Housecall." To give it a bigger look than the usual loop, Damiano filmed it in Miami with $23,000 of the mob's money. One of the crew members making the trip with Damiano was Herbert Streicher, a 25-year-old Jewish kid from Westchester who had done Wheaties commercials and Off-Broadway theater but was still struggling to make it as a legitimate actor. He had turned to porn, both behind and in front of the camera, to pay the bills, and had even made a couple of loops with Lovelace. On this trip he was hired strictly as a grip and gaffer.

Streicher liked Lovelace, and would always defend her as a sweet trusting person, even though he pooh-poohed her accounts of being forced into porn. "She's a beautiful person," he would say later. "As far as a personality, Linda has got that magnetic ability to draw an audience or anybody in a room directly to her, that twinkle in the eye, that real smile without phoniness or presumptuousness. Linda's a sweet, sweet girl, a very together person. She's not super bright, and she's not an actress, but she's totally open and free sexually."

If anyone knew what he was talking about, it was Streicher: his screen name was Harry Reems. When Damiano couldn't find anyone to play the key role of the doctor, he took Streicher/Reems off gaffer duty, bought him a white coat at a barber supply house, and film history was about to be made. The cast and crew settled into the Voyager Inn on Biscayne Boulevard and spent an uneventful six days shooting scenes that could just as easily have been shot in Brooklyn. Lovelace would later claim that she was savagely beaten by Traynor on the night before shooting began, but no one else noticed anything strange about his or her behavior. If anything, they thought Lovelace was a little too much in love.

Image

"She doted on [Traynor]," said Damiano. "She loved him, she was close to him, she was never out of his sight." In fact, Damiano discovered that she was so protective of Traynor's feelings that she would try to disguise the fact that she was enjoying the on-screen sex. After a while they started sending Traynor out to get cigarettes when they needed a "money shot" -- "and the sex got five times better because she relaxed," recalled Reems.

Of course, the other way to interpret that is that she was an abused intimidated slave -- the way she would be portrayed by Andrea Dworkin and Gloria Steinem, among others, in later years.

"Deep Throat" was the longest 62 minutes that millions of people would ever sit through. In retrospect, the most inspired decision Damiano made was to rename the movie "Deep Throat." Nothing else could possibly explain its success.

Lovelace was interviewed by Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show," further stoking the interest of socialites, students, swingers, and the curious. Sinema magazine summed up the effusive prose of the day, praising Lovelace's "fresh carnality, the air of thoroughly debauched innocence, the sense of a woman exploring the limits of sexual expression and feeling. Linda Lovelace is the girl next door grown up into a shameless . . . woman."

Everything peaked for her about a year after the movie's release when she appeared on the cover of Esquire and in a Playboy pictorial. She published her first autobiography, "Inside Linda Lovelace," and stated in the opening chapter, "I live for sex, will never get enough of it, and will continue to try every day to tune my physical mechanism to finer perfection. ... Nothing about sex is bad. That should be repeated over and over ... and perhaps the truth will eventually be seen." She also claimed that she had devised a sophisticated system of oriental and mystical self-discipline, bolstered by hypnosis, in order to achieve her secret techniques for satisfying men and herself.

What's odd, in retrospect, is that she failed to do the one thing that would have provided her with long-term income. Although she did occasional single-scene appearances in other porn movies, she only made one other full-length film--the sequel to "Deep Throat" -- then swore off hardcore altogether.

The Linda Lovelace films that did flood the market were actually her old loops that had been strung together to make choppy compilations like "The Confessions of Linda Lovelace" and "Linda Lovelace Meets Miss Jones." The "Deep Throat" sequel, on the other hand, was released in a softcore version only, and by the time it came out in 1974, with an R rating, audiences were infuriated that it didn't deliver the goods. (Supposedly the hardcore scenes had been removed because of a tricky legal situation, but that footage was stolen from a vault in New York City and never seen again.)

The beginning of the end came when Lovelace was arrested at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas in January 1974 for possession of cocaine and amphetamines.

She was just starting out on what she hoped would be a legitimate nightclub and theater career. The Aladdin Casino booked her for a play called "My Daughter's Rated X," but it closed after a week when, once again, audiences were disappointed to see that she didn't get naked.

She tried dinner theater in Philadelphia, bombing in "Pajama Tops." And sometime during this ill-advised nightclub period, she and Traynor broke up, and she instantly moved in with her producer and choreographer, David Winters. Winters became her new Svengali, setting up a new book deal for her that led to her second autobiography, "The Intimate Diary of Linda Lovelace," and a movie called "Linda Lovelace for President" that ended her dreams of mainstream stardom for good.

Image

Perhaps the most revealing interview she ever gave appeared in Penthouse magazine, and in it she sounds like a country girl lost in the big city. "After I got away from Traynor," she told Eric Danville, "it was a lot more fun, because I wasn't being sexually abused. I was walking around with transparent clothes on, but that wasn't too bad. I didn't think looking sexy was a terrible thing. I had many, many good times when I was with David. When I was with David I had an awesome time. I met a lot of people and had a lot of fun at that point. I went to see my first play. I saw Richard Chamberlain in 'Cyrano De Bergerac,' I saw 'Grease' in Manhattan. I saw the Alvin Ailey Dancers. I became cultured, I guess. I'd never been cultured."

By 1976, when "Linda Lovelace for President" ended her career, she had called it quits with Winters and run straight into the arms of yet another man, a construction worker named Larry Marchiano. By 1980 she had become a mother of two, a born-again Christian, and a feminist -- and was living on welfare as her husband tried to make ends meet as a cable installer on Long Island.

She had already become the feminist poster child for the demeaning effects of pornography, turning up in Andrea Dworkin's 1979 book "Pornography: Men Possessing Women." And now it was time to tell her story a third time, in the book "Ordeal," co-written by Mike McGrady, the writer who had planned the "Naked Came a Stranger" hoax of 1969. (The publisher, perhaps leery of McGrady, was so concerned about libel suits that Lovelace was required to take an 11-hour lie-detector test before they would go ahead with it.)

This is the book in which she made her most serious charges, accusing Traynor of virtual white slavery and the porn business as a whole of legalized rape. "When you see the movie 'Deep Throat,'" she told the Toronto Sun in 1981, "you are watching me being raped. It is a crime that movie is still showing; there was a gun to my head the entire time." She hit the lecture circuit, talking about the evils of porn for $1,500 per speech, and would eventually testify before the Meese Commission on Pornography in 1986.

Her old friends in the business never really took the allegations seriously.

"After 'Deep Throat' the business simply passed Linda by," said Eric Everett, her original sex partner in her loop days. "She wasn't particularly attractive nor could she act. If she'd told the truth about her life, her book may not have sold as well as making up a story that claims she was forced to do these disgusting things."

Yet she continued to be haunted by the film. Throughout the 1980s she was still in demand as a professional witness for anti-obscenity movements. She appeared on "Donahue" and testified before the Minneapolis City Council when it was considering a law defining pornography as discrimination against women. And in 1986 she wrote her last autobiography, "Out of Bondage," with an introduction by Gloria Steinem. Mostly she used the book to describe her poverty-ridden circumstances and to counter attacks on her credibility that resulted from "Ordeal." She portrayed herself as the typical rape victim who gets raped all over again in the court of public opinion when she decides to tell the truth.

Just as the book came out, though, her health fell apart. First she had a double radical mastectomy, the result of the silicone injections she'd gotten in 1971. But during the procedure, doctors discovered that her liver was malfunctioning, the result of the blood transfusion she'd had after her 1969 car accident. Apparently the original blood donor had Hepatitis C, and barring a liver transplant, she would die. A liver did become available in March 1987, and she underwent a 15-hour procedure at Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, followed by two months' convalescence. For the rest of her life, she would need an anti-rejection drug that costs $2,500 a month.

In 1990 her husband's drywall business collapsed and the family moved to Colorado. She worked for a while at a drug store, but had to quit because of varicose veins that made it difficult for her to stay on her feet all day. (She said this was the result of Traynor's repeated beatings and rapes, causing permanent damage to the blood vessels in her legs as well as internal damage.)

In 1993 she went to work for a computer company, doing purchasing and record keeping for $9.45 an hour, but she was fired a year later for falsifying a time card.

Her third marriage broke up in 1996. Continuing her pattern of vilifying her exes, she described Marchiano as an emotionally abusive alcoholic that she had loved for only the first two years. Using an interesting choice of words, she told a Denver reporter, "I prostituted myself [to Marchiano] so I could have my kids. They were the most important thing to me. They were all I ever wanted."

For the last years of her life she lived in Denver in a small condo, working in "user support" for an investment company and cleaning office buildings at night. She had also become a grandmother in 1998, when her daughter Lindsay gave birth at the age of 17.

For the generation born after "Deep Throat," the term had entered the vernacular as a synonym for oral sex and the name of several cocktails. (All of them are served in a shot glass with either whipped cream or Bailey's on top.) But even Generation Y knows who Linda Lovelace is, as her daughter found out in high school. "I'm not ashamed of my mother," she said. "I'm never going to say, oh no, that's not her . . . I just have to deal with it ..."

But even as the very last smidgen of controversy seemed to have been milked out of "Deep Throat," Ron Howard, the Hollywood producer/director, optioned the rights to "Ordeal" for $3,000.

So given the growing Hollywood fascination with all things sordid, we may see her story told one more time. Until then, she'll mostly be remembered as the "How did she do it?" girl among the people who saw the film, and the "Bad men made me do it" girl among feminists and Christian crusaders. The porn industry has coined its own term, "The Linda Syndrome," to describe porn stars, like Angel Kelly and Samantha Fox, who become stars and then disavow their porn past and embrace feminism.

Lovelace was the longest surviving member of her original liver-transplant support group, so it's ironic that she died alone, as the result of losing control of her car on April 3 and hitting a concrete post. For almost three weeks she remained on life support. When it was finally turned off on Monday, her parents were at her bedside, along with Marchiano and her two grown children. It was a car accident that led her into porn, and all these years later, it was a car accident that finally released her. In both cases, she never knew what hit her.

Source: UPI.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2011 9:23 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Stiff opposition to town's tribute to condom pioneer
By Tony Paterson in Berlin
Thursday, 10 March 2011

Image
The stunt was in honour of Julius Fromm, who invented the modern condom

With an upstanding municipal fountain nicknamed "The Penis" and a place in history as the town in which the inventor of the modern condom was born, many might argue that Konin in provincial Poland was more or less asking for it to happen.

Last weekend it did: an artists' group stormed the fountain and covered the structure with a mammoth transparent plastic preservatif, causing moral outrage among some officials and conservative Catholics in the town of 80,000 inhabitants halfway between Berlin and Warsaw.

"This is not an advertisement for birth control," insisted Waldemar Duczmal, who carried out the sheathing with fellow members of the Action Konin group, which says it pulls off provocative stunts to encourage tolerance.

The group said yesterday that the condom was meant to be an "opposite number" to a 37-metre-high statue of Christ erected by the Catholic Church in the Polish town of Swiebodzin last year. The spokesman said television coverage of the Christ statue presented a clichéd image of Poland as a backward country where religious fundamentalism reigned — an image he thought needed correcting. But the group said the stunt was also a serious attempt to pay respect to Julius Fromm, Konin's former resident who invented the modern latex condom, which he patented in Germany in 1916.

"We found out about Fromm's links with Konin a year ago and tried to bring it to the town's attention," Mr Duczmal said. "When that failed we came up with this idea," he added, pointing out that the giant condom was stamped with Fromm's name and date of birth.

Dariusz Wilczewski, the deputy mayor, joined local religious leaders and complained in an interview with Poland's Rzeczpospolita newspaper that the condom had turned Konin into a laughing stock. In deeply Catholic Poland, the Church continues to take a dim view of contraception. However Zbigniew Lew-Starowicz, a sex therapist, said that Konin should build a memorial to the condom's creator. "The town should be proud of him. There is nothing to be ashamed of," he told Poland's TVN24 channel.

Fromm, who was Jewish, was forced to sell off his booming condom business to Hermann Göring's godmother in 1938. He died penniless in London in 1945 — four days before Germany's capitulation.

Source: The Independent UK.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:56 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Image

Germany's original teen sex advice writer dies
31 August 2012

The man who gave millions of German teenagers their first information about sex and love has died at 85. Bravo magazine's original “Dr Sommer” Martin Goldstein gave frank advice to readers after spending his own childhood dodging Nazis.

“Is my vagina too small” and “How do I say 'I love you'?” were just a few of the questions Goldstein tackled during the 15 years he wrote the "Ask Dr Sommer" column in Bravo, Germany's largest youth magazine.

Goldstein spent his own childhood hiding from the Nazis after his Jewish father was sent to a concentration camp and he himself was sent to a forced labour camp. Rescued by his protestant mother, he survived the rest of the Third Reich by hiding in the woods near Bielefeld. Half a century passed before he was able to speak openly about his experiences. "I was afraid of the Gestapo, not of sex," he recalled many years later.

The man who educated a generation of Germans about sex was something of a late bloomer himself. "I was 23 years old the first time I had close contact with a woman," he said - in a dissection course at the university. "She had no head, and was floating in a toxic liquid."

Goldstein studied medicine, but instead of becoming a doctor, he became the director of a youth centre in Düsseldorf, where he developed his no-nonsense approach to sex. It was in 1969 that Bravo's then-editor asked Goldstein to take over an advice column. At that time sexuality was still taboo; the magazine advised its readers to take a cold shower to avoid engaging in masturbation. He answered readers' questions about sex, love and relationships until 1984. Modern teenagers might know more about sex, Goldstein said, but they are still had the same uncertainties.

"Girls used to ask, 'can I get pregnant from swallowing sperm?' nowadays it's more like, 'how many calories are in sperm? Will it make me fat?',” he said.

Goldstein died in hospice in Düsseldorf following a long illness.

Source: The Local Germany.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 7:35 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Pioneer of sex research, Virginia Johnson, dies at 88
July 25, 2013
By Kevin Murphy

Image

(Reuters) - Sex researcher Virginia Johnson, part of the famed Masters and Johnson team who conducted groundbreaking work on human sexuality, has died in St. Louis at the age of 88.

Johnson suffered from various illnesses before her death on Wednesday at an assisted living center, her son, Scott Johnson, said on Thursday.

Virginia Johnson and William Masters, who died in 2001, met when she was a researcher for him at Washington University in St. Louis in the 1950s. Masters, a physician at the university, began researching sex in 1954. The couple's best-selling book "Human Sexual Response" was published in 1966 after years of laboratory research and testing sexual arousal in couples. They published what was considered a second major study, "Human Sexual Inadequacy," in 1970.

Her son said publication of the two books "forever changed the study of sex" and helped in the development of treatments for sexual dysfunction. "She was very proud of her life's work," Scott Johnson said.

Masters and Johnson married in 1971 and formed the Masters and Johnson Institute in St. Louis to continue their research and reports. They divorced after 20 years, but often appeared on talk shows and other programs to discuss their research.

Image

Robert Kolodny, a physician who studied with Masters and Johnson as a Washington University student in the 1960s and later became a researcher and training director at their institute, said Johnson was unique in the field of sex research. "She received many awards, and is fairly widely recognized as one of most important women in science in the 20th Century," Kolodny said. Until Masters and Johnson published their research, psychological therapy for sexual problems only succeeded 15 percent to 20 percent of the time, Kolodny said. But their approach to helping people overcome their anxieties and recognize sex as a form of communication led to an 85 percent improvement rate within two weeks of the therapy sessions, he said. "It turned a lot of lives around," said Kolodny, who wrote 14 books with Masters and Johnson.

Image

(Editing by Greg McCune, Matthew Lewis and Jan Paschal)
Source: Reuters.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2015 5:15 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:58 am
Posts: 94851
Location: Floating in space
Rice-Davies, key figure in British Profumo sex scandal, dies
December 19, 2014

image
Mandy Rice-Davies was a central figure in the Profumo affair, which rocked Harold Macmillan's Conservative government in the 1960s (AFP Photo/Leon Neal)

London (AFP) - Mandy Rice-Davies, a central figure in the Profumo affair that scandalised 1960s Britain and almost brought down the government, has died of cancer at the age of 70, it was announced on Friday.

Allegations by Rice-Davies, who became known by her married name Marilyn Foreman, were part of a wave of lurid disclosures that threatened Harold Macmillan's Conservative administration in 1963.

The nightclub dancer caused a sensation in the witness box of the Old Bailey when she dismissed a denial by Lord Astor that he had slept with her, saying: "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" The phrase became famous in its own right as a response to self-justifying claims by people involved in disputes.

The scandal centred on allegations that Secretary of State for War John Profumo had shared a mistress, Christine Keeler, with a Russian defence attache. Profumo, who later resigned in disgrace, was said to have been introduced to showgirl Keeler through osteopath Stephen Ward at a party at Lord Astor's mansion at Cliveden in Berkshire.

Image
Geoffrey Robertson QC (right), Mandy Rice-Davies (centre) and composer Andrew Lloyd-Webber at the launch in London in December 2013 of Robertson's book "Stephen Ward was Innocent, OK" (AFP Photo/Leon Neal)

Ward was charged with living off the immoral earnings of Keeler and Rice-Davies. It was at his trial at the Old Bailey that Rice-Davies made her legendary remark. Many years later, Lord Astor's wife denied that there had been any affair, but Rice-Davies always stuck to her story. "What was Bill (Lord Astor) doing? I didn't seduce Bill. I didn't even flutter an eyelash at him. I wasn't a temptress. He seduced me. In those days, women did not leap upon men," she said. "The only reason I still want to talk about it is that I have to fight the misconception that I was a prostitute. I don't want that to be passed on to my grandchildren. There is still a stigma," she said.

Last year she attended a press conference supporting the launch of a book claiming Ward, who took an overdose of sleeping tablets on the last day of his trial and was found guilty while in a coma, was innocent. He died shortly after the verdict. Geoffrey Robertson QC said the trial was unfair and was a cover-up by the legal establishment.

A spokesman for the Hackford Jones PR agency said: "It is with deep sadness that the family of Marilyn Foreman, also known as Mandy Rice-Davies, have confirmed that she passed away yesterday evening after a short battle with cancer. They have asked for their privacy to be respected and no further comment will be made."

Source: Yahoo! AFP.

_________________
"My bed is my office."
Visit our Gallery, list your business in our Directory!


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:14 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:19 am
Posts: 8361
Location: Planet Earth (sometimes)
Model in Britain's sex-and-spy Profumo scandal dies at 75
By GREGORY KATZ and JILL LAWLESS
6 December 2017

LONDON (AP) -- Christine Keeler, the central figure in the sex-and-espionage Profumo scandal that rocked Cold War Britain, has died at 75.

Her son, Seymour Platt, posted on Facebook that Keeler died Monday at a hospital near Farnborough in southern England. Platt said on Facebook that his mother died late Monday night after suffering for several years from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. "As many of you know my mother, Christine Keeler, fought many fights in her eventful life, some fights she lost but some she won," he said. "She earned her place in British history but at a huge personal price. We are all very proud of who she was."

Keeler was a model and nightclub dancer in 1963 when she had an affair with British War Secretary John Profumo. When it emerged that Keeler had also slept with a Soviet naval attache with ties to Russian intelligence, the collision of sex, wealth and national security issues caused a sensation and helped topple the Conservative government.

Profumo eventually resigned in disgrace after lying to the House of Commons about his relationship with Keeler. He threatened at the time to sue anyone who suggested there had been any inappropriate behavior with her. The stunning sex scandal shed light on a previously well-hidden world of sex and alcohol fueled orgies among the political elite. The scandal also made Keeler famous. A naked photo of Keeler straddling the back of a chair is among the most famous U.K. images of the 1960s. She spent the rest of her life trying to escape her unwanted notoriety.

Born in 1942, Keeler left school at 15 and shortly after started working as a showgirl on Greek Street in the heart of London's Soho district, known at the time for its strip clubs and sleazy entertainment. Keeler met men like Profumo after befriending a high-society osteopath, Dr. Stephen Ward, who introduced her to a number of powerful figures.

Ward was put on trial and took a fatal overdose the night before he was convicted of living off immoral earnings. Keeler was imprisoned for nine months after admitting perjury and conspiring to obstruct justice. More than two decades later, she expressed regret: "I was just a 19-year-old girl having a good time. I loved every minute of it. But if I had known then what was going to happen, I'd have run off and not stopped until I had reached my mum."

Keeler moved on after the scandal. She was married twice and had two sons, even as pop culture breathed new life into the Profumo affair. In 2013, Andrew Lloyd Webber's stage musical "Stephen Ward" - in which Keeler was portrayed by Charlotte Spencer - premiered in London.

Source: AP

_________________
Utterly totally and completely brilliantly wunderbar
Cutiepie Snoozikin Scrupelshrumpilstilskin's "major pain in the butt"
Sex. Enjoy it. Talk about it. Share the experience. Learn from others.


Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TuentiShare on SonicoShare on FriendFeedShare on OrkutShare on DiggShare on RedditShare on DeliciousShare on VKShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group