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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 4:22 am 
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Fans leave Williams tributes at Boston park bench
August 12, 2014

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Women write messages with chalk near a bench at Boston's Public Garden, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, where a small memorial has sprung up at the place where Robin Williams filmed a scene during the movie, "Good Will Hunting." (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

BOSTON (AP) -- A bench in Boston has become a quiet memorial to Robin Williams, whose Academy Award-winning performance in "Good Will Hunting" was filmed in the city.

In the 1997 movie, Williams, playing an empathetic therapist, and his patient, a blue-collar genius played by Matt Damon, have a conversation on a bench in Boston's Public Garden.

Dozens of people quietly visited it Tuesday. Some left tributes - pinwheels, flowers, bottles of beer, a teddy bear, an autographed baseball.

Some used chalk to write messages on the walkway. Many were quotes from his performances: "It's not your fault," from "Good Will Hunting," and, "You ain't never had a friend like me," from "Aladdin."

Ben Affleck, a co-star and co-writer on "Good Will Hunting," was among the legions of friends and fans who shared tributes online. "Robin had a ton of love & did so much for so many," Affleck tweeted. "He made Matt & my dreams come true. What do you owe a guy who does that? Everything."

Makeshift memorials of flowers and notes popped up around the country including on his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at his home and outside the house in Boulder, Colorado, where the sitcom "Mork & Mindy" was set.

DVDs of movies starring Williams sold out on Amazon.

Williams died Monday at his California home at age 63. Authorities say he hanged himself.

Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 5:03 am 
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Lauren Bacall, Hollywood's Icon of Cool, Dies at 89
August 13, 2014
By Mike Barnes and Duane Byrge

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Lauren Bacall

The sultry and sexy actress was electric in the 1940s films “To Have and Have Not” and “Key Largo” opposite her husband, Humphrey Bogart

Lauren Bacall, the willowy actress whose husky voice, sultry beauty and all-too-short May-December romance with Humphrey Bogart made her an everlasting icon of Hollywood, has died, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed. She was 89. Bacall died Tuesday morning of a stroke in her longtime home in the Dakota, the famous Upper West Side building that overlooks Central Park in Manhattan.

Bogart and Bacall were one of the most popular Hollywood couples, onscreen and off, and their 11-year marriage was the stuff of romantic lore. In 1981, their love provided the lyrics for Bertie Higgins’ 1981 pop hit “Key Largo” — “We had it all, just like Bogie and Bacall.” They met just before they filmed her first movie, To Have and Have Not (1944), directed by Howard Hawks, her mentor. Although only 19, Bacall and her smoldering cool was the perfect match for the 44-year-old Bogart and his tough guy-persona.

Her best-remembered films, many of them considered classics, were with Bogart: To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947) and Key Largo (1948).

After Bogart died at age 57 of esophageal cancer in January 1957, Bacall had a romance with Frank Sinatra. Days after she accepted his marriage proposal in 1958, The Los Angeles Herald reported on the impending nuptial on page 1 and Sinatra broke things off, refusing to speak to her for two decades. She then was married to Oscar-winning actor Jason Robards from 1961 until their divorce in 1969. Their son, actor Sam Robards, survives them.

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Lauren Bacall

Bacall received her only Oscar nomination for her supporting role as Barbra Streisand’s mother in The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996). She was the recipient of an honorary Academy Award in 2010 “in recognition of her central place in the Golden Age of motion pictures,” but that moment did not lead to pleasant memories — she said she always regretted failing to mention her children Sam, Stephen and Leslie in her acceptance speech.

Bacall also enjoyed a splendid stage career. She captured two Tony Awards for best actress in a musical: in 1970 for Applause, the adaptation of All About Eve, in which she played Margo Channing, the role created by her idol Bette Davis; and in 1981 for Woman of the Year in a part originated by Katharine Hepburn, a good friend whom she once called “the female counterpart to Bogie.” Bacall also received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for Career Achievement from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1992.

Bacall penned two memoirs, By Myself (1978), which won a National Book Award in 1980, and Now (1994), in which she mused about getting older and living alone. She admitted that being a “legend” and “special lady of film” unnerved her because “in my slightly paranoiac head, legends and special ladies don’t work, it’s over for them; they just go around being legends and special ladies.”

She was born Betty Jean Perske in the Bronx on Sept. 16, 1924, the only child of Jewish immigrants. Her father left the family when she was 6, and her mother struggled to make ends meet. She attracted attention as a teenage model while studying acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York. Crowned Miss Greenwich Village in 1942, Bacall made her stage debut in George S. Kaufman’s Franklin Street in Washington, then appeared in March 1943 on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar. That cover photo was noticed by Hawks’ wife Nancy, who showed it to the celebrated director, and he called Bacall for a screen test. Based on the test, Hawks told her she would star in something with either Bogart or Cary Grant.

“I thought Cary Grant, great. Humphrey Bogart‚ yuck,” she later said. Nonetheless, Hawks had her meet with Bogart and could not help but notice their immediate chemistry, casting her as the femme fatale Marie in To Have and Have Not, an adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel. (Bogart’s character, Steve, nicknamed her “Slim,” which Hawks also called his wife.)

In By Myself, she described meeting Bogart for the first time, on the set of Passage to Marseille (1944). “Howard told me to stay put, he’d be right back — which he was, with Bogart,” she wrote. “He introduced us. There was no clap of thunder, no lightning bolt, just a simple how do you do. Bogart was slighter than I imagined‚ 5-foot-10 and a half, wearing his costume of no-shape trousers, cotton shirt and scarf around his neck. Nothing of import was said‚ we didn’t stay long‚ but he seemed a friendly man.” But soon, Bacall and Bogart — who at the time was married to his third wife, actress Mayo Methot — began an affair during the filming of To Have and Have Not.

One particular scene in the film stands out: As Bacall stood fetchingly just inside Bogart’s hotel room door, readying to leave, she noticed his tongue-tied interest in her: “You don’t have to say anything, Steve, just whistle. You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve?” … You just put your lips together and blow.” She closed the door, leaving Bogart’s character awestruck.

The two married in 1945 on a farm in Lucas, Ohio, owned by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Louis Bromfield, a friend of Bogart’s, and regularly hosted parties at their Holmby Hills mansion. “I fairly often have thought how lucky I was,” she told Vanity Fair in a 2011 interview. “I knew everybody because I was married to Bogie, and that 25-year difference was the most fantastic thing for me to have in my life.”

Bacall later admitted her so-called cool was just a way of concealing her jangled, first-movie insecurity. “I used to tremble from nerves so badly that the only way I could hold my head steady was to lower my chin practically to my chest and look up at Bogie,” she said. That was the beginning of what admirers called “The Look.”



Her legendary low, sexy voice, however, hampered a scene in To Have and Have Not, where she was supposed to sing. It has always been a point of speculation whether it was Andy Williams, then a teenager, who dubbed in the signing voice for Bacall’s rendition of Hoagy Carmichael’s “How Little We Know.” Her distinctive throaty voice did make her a natural for commercials, and later in her career, Bacall voiced numerous spots, including plugs for PBS.

Following To Have and Have Not, her next film was opposite Charles Boyer in Graham Greene’s Confidential Agent (1945) in which she played an English girl. Bacall considered the experience horrible. “It was the worst movie, a nightmare, and I was terrible in it,” she said. “And as quickly as I had been placed on a pedestal, I fell off.” But she was cast opposite Bogart again in Hawks’ classic The Big Sleep, a steamy adaptation of a Raymond Chandler novel in which Bogart plays the classic private eye Philip Marlowe while Bacall sizzled as the lithesome daughter of Bogart’s rich, sinister employer. Bacall followed with two more starring roles opposite Bogart, Dark Passage and Key Largo, John Huston's classic noir film.

She followed in 1950 in a film without Bogart titled Bright Leaf and did her first comedy, How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), starring with Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable. Perhaps her most memorable film from the 1950s was Douglas Sirk’s melodrama Written on the Wind (1956) with Rock Hudson. The following year, Bogart died of cancer, leaving her with their children Stephen and Leslie. Bacall was 32 at the time.

Following Bogart’s death, Bacall dated Sinatra and was set to marry him, but he broke things off. “Frank did me a great favor. He saved me from the complete disaster our marriage would have been,” she told People magazine in 1979. “But the truth is that he behaved like a complete shit.”

She starred in Designing Women (1957) opposite Peck and in The Gift of Love (1958) with Robert Stack. She moved back to New York and appeared in a number of Broadway plays, then married Robards in 1961. She summed up that relationship in the People interview: “When I invited a few friends over to celebrate [Robards’] 40th birthday, Jason showed up at 2 a.m., loaded. I grabbed a bottle of vodka, smashed it into the cake and yelled, ‘Here’s your goddamn cake!’ The marriage ended when I came across a letter written to him by his girlfriend.”

Bacall did not make another film until Shock Treatment (1964), a murder mystery set in a mental institution. She followed up with a light comedy, Sex and the Single Girl (1964), which also starred Henry Fonda, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood. Bacall had a supporting role in the noir private eye thriller Harper (1966) with Paul Newman, played in the star-studded ensemble Murder on the Orient Express (1974), based on the Agatha Christie play, and co-starred with John Wayne in his final film, The Shootist (1976).

In 1981, she starred in The Fan, a riveting story about an actress being stalked by an obsessed fan (Michael Biehn), but spent the major part of the decade back on Broadway, winning the Tony in 1981 for Woman of the Year. She also starred on Broadway in Cactus Flower and Goodbye Charlie while venturing to London and Australia for Sweet Bird of Youth.

Film historians ascribe her relative lack of movie credits during this period as one of the unfortunate results of the demise of the studio system, an enterprise that for all its faults turned out strong female stars. Admitting that scripts were not “exactly piling up at my door,” she nevertheless returned to the screen with Mr. North (1988) and then Rob Reiner’s Misery (1990), the Stephen King adaptation starring Kathy Bates.

Later, she performed in several made-for-TV movies, in Robert Altman’s farce Pret-a-Porter (1994) and with Jack Lemmon and James Garner in the comedy romp My Fellow Americans (1996). Altman talked about her longevity in a 1997 interview. “She never got locked in any time warp,” he said. “Think about how many social and attitudinal changes that have occurred, and yet Bacall as always remained unique.”

Most recently, Bacall appeared in the French film Le Jour et la Nuit (1997); in Diamonds with Kirk Douglas and in Presence of Mind with Harvey Keitel, both released in 1999; in the TV miniseries Too Rich: The Secret Life of Doris Duke (1998) as the billionaire tobacco heiress; in Dogville (2003) with Nicole Kidman; and in The Forger (2012).

In a 2006 episode of The Sopranos, Bacall played herself getting accosted by a mugger who tried to swipe her swag bag as she left an awards show.

Source: Yahoo! Hollywood Reporter.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 5:08 am 
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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 4:41 am 
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Robin Williams: Bay Area made him feel normal
13 August 2014
By ELLEN KNICKMEYER

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In this file photo from Thursday, Oct. 7, 2010, actor Robin Williams hugs San Francisco Giants mascot Lou Seal during the first inning of Game 1 of baseball's National League Division Series in San Francisco. Williams was everywhere in San Francisco, it seemed, as he made a place for himself in the everyday fabric of a city where he once said he passed for normal. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Robin Williams was everywhere in San Francisco, it seemed, as he made a place for himself in the everyday fabric of a city where he once said he passed for normal.

The comedian was there to usher a few fellow inhabitants of the Bay Area into life - visiting a pediatric ward, unheralded, each year on Christmas Day to welcome newborns to the world. He also ushered friends out of life- delivering a boisterous eulogy for an iconic local journalist known as Mr. San Francisco, musing on heaven as a nice bar in the city with a dry martini.

In between, Williams had turned out to cheer everything from the Giants to the opening of a local public library. Bay Area people got used to seeing the actor at restaurants and stand-up clubs, even handing out treats to children at his house, with a topiary dinosaur looming in the yard, at Halloween. After word of his apparent suicide this week at his home in Marin County, residents who had encountered Williams recalled a comedian who didn't always try to be funny but never failed to be gracious.

In 1998, Dr. Carrie Chen and colleagues at the University of California-San Francisco hospital had just delivered a premature baby on Christmas Day. "And then someone knocked at the door and said Robin Williams was there," Chen said. "He looked at this tiny baby, all the tubes and IVs coming out of him. And then he looked each and every one of us in the eye, and personally thanked us for being there on Christmas Day, and for being there for the baby," Chen recalled. "He made it all about us and not about him," she said.

The only child of a well-off auto executive, Williams was born in Chicago and moved to Larkspur north of San Francisco with his family in the late 1960s. In a 1991 interview with an Oklahoma newspaper, Williams credited going to a "gestalt" Marin County high school - where he said a teacher one day shared that he had just taken LSD - with helping him discover comedy as a way to bridge the gap he felt between himself and others.

Later, at the College of Marin, theater director James Dunn saw the genius in Williams when the young student riffed on stage one night, bringing classmates to tears of laughter. Dunn waked his wife when he got home. "You will not have believed what I have just seen," he told her. "This young man is going to be somebody one day."

Williams through the years raised funds and gave scholarships at the college, and he was a familiar sight riding his bike, running trails, shopping in the supermarkets in Marin. "He just loved the Bay Area," Dunn said. "It kept him away from the hurly-burly of Hollywood, and he liked that."

In private, people found Williams quiet and unassuming. Not the guy "with the lampshade on his head and throwing eggs in the air," said longtime Bay Area comedian Brian Copeland, who last saw Williams in February at a comedy club, Throckmorton, not far from Williams' home in Tiburon, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. Williams "once told me that the average encounter with a fan lasts about 44 seconds," Copeland recalled Monday. "And that you should be able to be nice to them for those 44 seconds."

Williams had helped the San Francisco Zoo raise hundreds of thousands of dollars and donated time reading books to children, zoo director Tanya Peterson said Tuesday. During a visit in June that turned out to be one of his last public outings, zoo workers showed Williams a howler monkey they had named after him, Peterson said. But Williams really had come to visit old pet parrot he had donated to the zoo years ago when travel made keeping the bird impossible. He was "very thrilled to see the parrot with other parrots acting like a parrot," Peterson said. "I think it brought him great joy."

In 1997, Williams gave a San Francisco-styled eulogy to San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen, whose work had memorialized the city's beauty and characters for decades. Caen was probably in his own version of heaven, Williams said - a club on San Francisco's Fillmore North. Williams read out loud part of Caen's own tribute to San Francisco, where newcomers glory `"in the sights and sounds of a city they suddenly decided to love instead of leave.'" "I'm sorry you had to leave, man, but you're still here. See ya," Williams said then.

Associated Press Writer Terry Collins contributed to this report
Source: AP.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 9:27 pm 
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Levinson pays tribute to Robin Williams
30 August 2014
By Adam Egan

VENICE, Italy (AP) -- Filmmaker Barry Levinson, who directed Robin Williams in one of his best-loved roles, says the late comedian was an extraordinary performer.

Levinson - in Venice to screen film fest entry "The Humbling" - directed "Good Morning, Vietnam." Williams gained dramatic credibility, and an Academy Award nomination, with his performance as a fast-talking army radio DJ during the Vietnam War in the 1987 movie. "He was brilliant and sensitive in ways that were extraordinary," Levinson said of Williams, who committed suicide Aug. 11 at the age of 63.

At a Venice news conference, the director recalled how Williams had improvised scenes with Vietnamese performers on the set of the movie.

"And his interest in the people was so fascinating that he was able to pull out their behavior and how they thought and functioned, which really brought a life to `Good Morning Vietnam' up and above what the story details were," Levinson said. "He had an enormous passion for people, a great sense of humanity and he was an extraordinary human being."

Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2014 6:27 am 
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Joan Rivers' most scathing red carpet fashion criticisms: 'She's a disaster'
by Anne T Donahue
Friday, 5 September 2014

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Joan Rivers arrives to the 78th Annual Academy Awards in 2006. Photograph: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Joan Rivers was as funny as she was feared, especially during Hollywood’s award season.

Having built her career on speaking her mind, the comedian became a red carpet fixture in the mid 90s for her praise and criticism of celebrity outfits. In tribute to her cutting one-liners, here is a selection of her best red carpet zingers.

Anna Kendrick (Oscars 2014)

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Anna Kendrick at the 2014 Oscars. Photograph: Getty
Joan Rivers: “I like her, such a good actress, but the dress is ill-fitted, the slit is too short at the knee – the bodice of her dress makes her look like she has her left breast in a sling.”

Rivers’ humour wasn’t lost on Kendrick.
    RIP Joan Rivers. Being publicly told that my dress is hideous will never feel quite as awesome. You will be truly missed.

Lady Gaga (2012)

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Lady Gaga in Hong Kong in 2012. Photograph: Getty
Rivers kept her instructions to Kelly Osborne, her purple-haired co-host, simple: “Look away, Kelly! I don’t want you to have to see this: so many of your people have died to make that dress.”

Natalie Portman (2010)

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Actress Natalie Portman attends the New York Premiere of Black Swan in 2010. Photograph: Marcel Thomas/FilmMagic
Joan Rivers: “I don’t like that she’s carrying a book. It says: ‘This movie sucks, it’s so boring I’m going to read through it.’”

Lindsay Lohan (various)

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Lindsay Lohan attends the GQ men of the year awards at The Royal Opera House on September 2, 2014 in London, England. Photograph: Ben Pruchnie/FilmMagic
Joan Rivers: “She’s such a disaster, when the trains actually wreck now, they call them ‘Lindsay Lohans.’”

Yesterday, Lindsay finally set the record straight:
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    We'd fuss but love was there. Cant believe ur gone. Love to your family. You were iconic and trailblazing. RIP Joan

Rihanna (2014)

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Rhianna at the iHeartRadio awards in 2014. Photograph: AP
Joan Rivers: “I love Rihanna. I think she can do no wrong, but … I have not seen lips that green since Miss Piggy got out of the backseat of Kermit’s car.”

A few months later, and Rihanna was rallying her troops:
    Please keep Joan Rivers in your prayers

Keri Hilson (2011)

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Kerry Hilson at a pre-Grammys gala in 2011. Photograph: Getty
Joan Rivers: “I just wanna build a fire, pour champagne, and make love on top of her.”

Florence Welch (2011)

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Florence Welch at the 2011 Grammy awards. Photograph: UPI
Joan Rivers: “She was so committed to that bird theme that halfway through, she left the ceremony to go crap on somebody’s windshield.”

Lena Dunham (various, but specifically: 2013)

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Dunham at the 'This is 40' Hollywood Premiere held at Grauman's Chinese Theater, Hollywood. Photograph: Jeff Frank/ Jeff Frank/ZUMA Press/Corbis
When Rivers was questioned about Dunham’s body she said: “I don’t look at her breasts, I’m always reading them.” (In reference to Dunham’s many tattoos.)

Which is why it was so fitting that Dunham eulogized Rivers on Twitter the best way she could:
    That being said, Joan is gone but a piece of her lives on: her nose, because it's made of polyurethane.

Source: Guardian UK.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:07 pm 
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'Big Bang Theory' actress Carol Ann Susi dies
12 November 2014

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This undated image provided by Warner Bros. Television shows a headshot of actress Carol Ann Susi. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Television)

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- The actress best known for voicing the unseen Mrs. Wolowitz on "The Big Bang Theory" has died.

Carol Ann Susi's agent, Pam Ellis-Evenas, says the actress died Tuesday in Los Angeles after a brief battle with cancer. She was 62. The veteran character actress has made numerous guest appearances on TV shows since the 1970s.

On the "The Big Bang Theory," she wasn't seen on camera as the mother of Simon Helberg's character, Howard, but her character's loud voice with a Brooklyn accent was instantly recognizable. The executive producers of the CBS sitcom say Susi was a beloved member of the "Big Bang Theory" family, and they praised her "immense talent and comedic timing."

Susi is survived by her brother, Michael Susi, and his wife, Connie.



Source: AP.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sun Feb 01, 2015 8:08 am 
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La Dolce Vita actress Anita Ekberg dies at 83
By COLLEEN BARRY and MALIN RISING
January 11, 2015

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In this Nov. 29, 1960 file photo, Swedish actress Anita Ekberg poses on the terrace of her hotel in Maratea, southern Italy. Anita Ekberg, the Swedish-born actress and sex-symbol of the 1950s and '60s who was immortalized bathing in the Trevi fountain in 'La Dolce Vita,' has died. She was 83. Ekberg's lawyer Patrizia Ubaldi confirmed her death Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Mario Torrisi, file)

MILAN (AP) — Anita Ekberg, the Swedish-born actress and sex-symbol of the 1950s and '60s who was immortalized bathing in the Trevi fountain in "La Dolce Vita," has died. She was 83.

Ekberg's lawyer Patrizia Ubaldi confirmed she died in Rome Sunday morning following a series of illnesses. She had been hospitalized most recently after Christmas. Ubaldi said that in her last days Ekberg was saddened by the illness and her advancing age. "She had hoped to get better, something that didn't happen," she said.

Ekberg had long lived in Italy, the country that gave her worldwide fame thanks to the iconic dip opposite Marcello Mastroianni. The scene where the blond bombshell, clad in a black dress, her arms wide open, calls out "Marcello" remains one of the most famous images in film history. Her curvaceous body and glamorous social life made her a favorite of tabloid press in the 1950s and 1960s. She married twice but never had children — a fact she came to regret later in her life. Some gossip magazines called her "The Iceberg" in a nod to her Scandinavian background.

But even as she became one of Sweden's most famous exports, Ekberg maintained a problematic relation with her native country. She never starred in a Swedish film and was often at odds with Swedish journalists, who criticized her for leaving the country and ridiculed her for adopting an American accent. Born on Sept. 29, 1931, in the southern city of Malmo, Ekberg grew up with seven siblings.

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Actress Anita Ekberg arrives on the red carpet to attend the screening of the restored version of Italian director Federico Fellini's movie "La Dolce Vita " during the Rome Film Festival at Rome's Auditorium, in this Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010 file photo. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia, File)

In 1951 she won the Miss Sweden competition, after being recommended to enter by organizers who saw her on the street, and went to the United States to compete for the Miss Universe title. She didn't win but became a model in Hollywood and later started taking on small acting roles. Her role in Federico Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" — where she played a movie star — shot her to stardom. The movie was a colossal success and came to define the wild and carefree days of the early 1960s.

Ekberg was immortalized for wading into Rome's Trevi Fountain wearing a black strapless dress. That scene, one of the most famous moments in film history, was drawn from her real life experience. "I was doing a photographic session and I cut my foot, and it was in August, so suddenly this Fontana di Trevi arrived in front of me, and I thought: How, how marvellous, I am going to wash my cut," she told Dutch TROS television in 1994. She said she turned to the photographer and told him: "Pierluigi, come here, it is so wonderful and cool." Instead, he took pictures, which were later seen by Fellini, who decided to re-enact the scene for La Dolce Vita.

Hosting a Swedish radio program in 2005, Ekberg recalled shooting the scene in the Trevi Fountain in Rome. She said it was shot in February, the water in the fountain was cold and Mastroianni was falling over in the fountain drunk on vodka. "And there I was. I was freezing," she said. "They had to lift me out of the water because I couldn't feel my legs anymore. I have seen that scene a few times. Maybe too many times. I can't stand watching it anymore, but it was beautiful at the time," she said.

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Anita Ekberg with her first husband Anthony Steel, a British actor, pictured here in London in 1956 (AFP Photo/)

Ekberg remained in Italy for years, appearing in scores of movies, many forgettable. She returned in two Fellini movies: "Clowns" and "Intervista." Ekberg married Briton Anthony Steel in 1956, but divorced him four years later. In 1963 she married again to actor Rik van Nutter, but that marriage also failed.

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Anita Ekberg in the scene at the Trevi fountain in Rome

In an interview with Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet in 2006, Ekberg said her only regret in life was never having children. "I would have liked to have a child, preferably a son," she was quoted as saying. "It didn't turn out that way. That's life, you just have to accept it." In the interview, published in connection with Ekberg's 75th birthday, she also said she wasn't afraid of death. "I'm just angry because I won't get the chance to tell others about death, where the soul goes and if there is a life afterward," she was quoted as saying. "I don't know if paradise or hell exist, but I'm sure hell is more groovy."

Ubaldi said a ceremony would be held in the coming days at a Lutheran church in Rome, and that Ekberg had specified that her remains be cremated.



Source: Yahoo! AP.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2015 9:12 am 
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Louis Jourdan, French actor and star of Gigi, dies aged 93
16 February 2015

The French actor Louis Jourdan, best known for his role in the multi-Oscar winning 1958 musical Gigi, has died in California aged 93.

Born in Marseilles, he began his career acting in French films before being lured to the US.

Often seen in roles that capitalised on his Gallic charm, he described himself as Hollywood's "French cliche". His later years saw him play evil villains, including in the 1983 Bond film Octopussy.

Jourdan died at his home in Los Angeles, his official biographer Olivier Minne said. "He embodied French elegance and Hollywood offered him the parts to go with that," he told the AFP news agency.

Among those paying tribute on Twitter was Indian film star Kabir Bedi, who played Jourdan's bodyguard Gobinda in Octopussy. "Deeply saddened to hear, from @twitter friends, of the passing of Louis Jordan," he wrote.

Cassian Elwes, producer of films including Monster's Ball and Dallas Buyers Club, wrote: "Louis Jourdan was an absolutely charming man who was always elegant in everything he did it was no wonder he was friends w [sic] everyone he met."

American actress Rose McGowan, whose films include The Black Dahlia, wrote: "Louis Jourdan, thank you for the entertainment. Your elegant beauty and wit were a joy to behold."

French resistance

Born Louis Gendre in 1921, he changed his name to Pierre Jourdan, then Louis Jourdan when he became an actor.

According to a biography by the late Hollywood correspondent Bob Thomas, Jourdan's father owned a seaside hotel in Cannes, where he met artists, actors and directors who encouraged him to study drama in Paris.

His early career in France was interrupted by World War Two. He refused to star in Nazi propaganda films and escaped to join the French resistance. After the war, he resumed his film career, eventually becoming one of Hollywood's favourite French actors.

Jourdan played opposite leading ladies Joan Fontaine, Jennifer Jones, Grace Kelly and Shirley MacLaine in films during the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s.

Gigi, a musical romantic comedy in which he played the suave Gaston Lachaille, was one of the most successful films of the 1950s. It won nine Oscars, including best picture.

Despite this, Jourdan did not consider Gigi his best achievement, reportedly saying: "It was a wonderful story for Leslie and Maurice Chevalier, but I played a colourless leading man. "You'll note that none of the actors was nominated for Academy Awards."

'Perpetually cooing'

Other key roles included a part in Alfred Hitchcock's 1947 film The Paradine Case, and with Grace Kelly in The Swan. He played concert pianist Stefan Brand opposite actress Joan Fontaine in the 1948 film Letter from an Unknown Woman.

He also showed that he could play a villain in the 1956 film Julie, in which he played Doris Day's husband, a psychopathic killer.

But despite his 15 years as a leading man, Jourdan felt he was often subject to Hollywood typecasting. "Any actor who comes here with an accent is automatically put in roles as a lover," the Associated Press news agency reported him as once saying. "I didn't want to be perpetually cooing in a lady's ear."

Jourdan has two stars on Hollywood's Walk of Fame and in 2010 he was given France's highest honour, Legion D'Honneur.

His wife of more than 60 years, Berthe Frederique Jourdan, died last year.

Source: BBC

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:29 pm 
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Robin Williams the posthumous star of `3 Still Standing'
By CHARMAINE NORONHA
April 18, 2015

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This Aug. 14, 2009 file photo shows actor Robin Williams in Los Angeles. Williams and Durst are highlighted in "3 Still Standing," a new documentary featured later in April 2015 at Toronto’s Hot Docs, North America’s largest documentary festival. The film marks one of Williams’ final appearances on screen. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

TORONTO (AP) -- Before the late Robin Williams enthralled television audiences on "Mork and Mindy," he already was a star on the 1970s stand-up comedy circuit - and by the `80s was a leading light for a new stand-up generation.

The political satirist Will Durst recalls how he once had the unenviable task of following Williams at the Holy City Zoo comedy club in San Francisco, a venue with a star-studded history that is being explored in a new documentary, "3 Still Standing."

"There were 15, 20 people in the club before (Williams) came on stage. He came on and word went up and down the streets. There were a bunch of nearby bars and everybody left them and wandered over to the Zoo. The place was packed, all the way out to the hall, onto the sidewalk. People were trying to peer in, just to watch him. And I had to follow him. When I hit the stage, it was like a massive movement out, like the great exodus," Durst said, laughing. "That was quite a baptism."

Williams provides a poignant focal point for "3 Still Standing," which has toured U.S. film festivals and is being shown this month at Toronto's Hot Docs, North America's largest documentary festival. His 2013 interview for the documentary represents one of Williams' final appearances on screen.

The documentary follows the stand-up careers of Durst, Larry "Bubbles" Brown and Johnny Steele, who are credited with helping to launch a comedy revolution in San Francisco in the 1980s alongside Dana Carvey, Rob Schneider and Paula Poundstone. All were awed and influenced by Williams.

"There's a story Dana Carvey tells," Robert Campos, the producer of the documentary, told the Associated Press. "He was at an open mic watching these comedians up on stage and he thinks, `Oh I can do that.' And then some guy goes up and blows the roof off the stage and Dana thinks, `Oh, I can't do that' - and it's Robin Williams."

"You can go to any tiny comedy club in the country and there's a picture of Robin with the owner arm in arm," Campos said. "He just really loved to perform. It's like Jerry Seinfeld and Jon Stewart say: Once you're a stand-up, you're a stand-up. There's something pure about that form." Durst puts it another way: "It's like malaria. It's in your bloodstream."

Campos and his wife and co-producer Donna LoCicero said they felt compelled to make the documentary because they were huge fans of the `80s San Francisco comedy scene. Campos said when they told Williams about their project focusing on Durst, Brown and Steele, he said, "I love these guys, let's do it!"

Williams, who had battled depression and Parkinson's disease, hanged himself on Aug. 11, 2014, at age 63.

Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2015 6:31 am 
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Time magazine longtime film critic Richard Corliss dies
April 24, 2015

NEW YORK (AP) -- Richard Corliss, the longtime film critic for Time magazine, has died after suffering a major stroke last week, the magazine said Friday. He was 71.

"He conveyed nothing so much as the sheer joy of watching movies - and writing about them," Time theater critic Richard Zoglin said in an online tribute to Corliss. "He was a perceptive, invaluable guide through three and a half decades of Hollywood films, stars and trends." In his 35 years as the magazine's film critic, Corliss wrote more than 2,500 reviews and other articles.

Time Editor Nancy Gibbs called Corliss a master of the written word. Words "were his tools, his toys, to the point that it felt sometimes as though he had to write, like the rest of us breathe and eat and sleep," she said. "His prose was zestful and sparkling - it simply jumped off the page," Zoglin said. He said Corliss had an encyclopedic knowledge of film and its place in cinematic, cultural and American history.

His reviews were "authoritative but never intimidating" and his tastes "populist but eclectic," ranging from Chinese kung fu and Disney animation to films by Ingmar Bergman and Werner Herzog. Early in his career, Corliss dismissed the box office "Star Wars" hit, stating that "the movie's legs will prove as vulnerable as C-3PO's." But he soon embraced the films by Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Of Spielberg's "E.T.," he said "the movie is a perfectly poised mixture of sweet comedy and 10-speed melodrama, of death and resurrection, of a friendship so pure and powerful it seems like an idealized love."

Corliss also was the author of several books "Talking Pictures" in 1974 was a survey of major Hollywood screenwriters. He also wrote a monograph on Stanley Kubrick's Lolita and last year published a book on iconic film mothers titled "Mom in the Movies." His wife of more than 40 years, Mary Corliss is curator of the Film Stills Archive at New York's Museum of Modern Art.

"Our tributes and a sampling of his writing from his 35 years at Time allow us to savor the immense range and excellence of his work as one of the world's most important voices on film, and so many other subjects," said Gibbs. "We will miss him terribly, and our prayers are with his beloved wife Mary."

Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2015 1:17 pm 
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Screen sex icon Laura Antonelli dies
23 June 2015

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Malizia star 'made a generation dream'. (foto: ANSA)

(ANSA) - Rome - Italian actress Laura Antonelli, the iconic star of Malizia and other erotic milestones who reigned as a sex symbol in the 70s and 80s before a fall from grace saw her end up poor and virtually alone, comforted by the rosary on the radio, has died at age 73.

Antonelli died of a heart attack in her home in the small seaside town of Ladispoli, near Rome, Sunday night. The stuff of dreams for a generation of male filmgoers, Antonelli appeared in over 40 films between the 1960s and early 1990s, winning popularity first in sexy movies and then in auteur pictures.

She was also involved in a long and successful battle to clear her name after being convicted of drugs offences, while her struggles with botched cosmetic surgery latterly grabbed the headlines, leading to her increased isolation.

Antonelli, whose real name was Laura Antonaz, was born in 1941 in the then Italian province of Istria, now Croatia. She was best known for her role in the 1973 film Malizia, directed by Salvatore Samperi, for which she won the Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Award, the Nastro d'Argento, for Best Actress. The steamy tale of a recent widower and his growing boys' lust for their new housekeeper in 1950s Sicily was a runaway hit and touted as a sign that strait-laced and Christian Democrat-dominated Italy was catching up with the sexual revolution of other countries.

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Antonelli went on to appear in a number of sex farces such as Till Marriage Do Us Part/'Mio Dio come sono caduta in basso!' (1974) in which she played a convent-bred girl who embraces the facts of life with gusto. In Wifemistress (1977) she played a repressed wife experiencing a sexual awakening and in 'Passione d'Amore' (1981) she reprised the steamy personas of her previous films.

Antonelli worked in more serious films as well, including Luchino Visconti's last film, The Innocent (1976). Her last film was a sequel to her breakthrough pic, Malizia 2000, in which she reunited with director Samperi in 1991. Shortly afterwards, her star descended rapidly following her arrest after police found cocaine in her home. Her conviction for drug possession and dealing was eventually overturned by the Italian Court of Appeals in 2006.

She died alone after having long since left the public scene, with actor Lino Banfi one of her few remaining public supporters in the industry. Antonelli had returned to the Catholic faith of her youth but, not daring to go to church for fear of the pitiless paparazzi lenses, got her spiritual comfort from private prayer and from the rosary broadcast by religious stations.

"Her death saddens me enormously and I am still anguished that I didn't help her enough. An actress that beautiful and talented shouldn't have ended like this," Banfi told ANSA. "She was a fragile diva," he said. "She was sociable, ironic, and generous...it was a tragedy how she ended up," he said.

Claudia Koll, a sex symbol to a later generation who also returned to the Church after a steamy career, sought Antonelli out and often joined her great predecessor in prayer. "I went to see her in Ladispoli and we both sought comfort in Christ," said Koll, a multiple star for soft-porn king Tinto Brass. "I gave her a painting of the Face of Christ overlaying the Holy Shroud of Turin," Koll told ANSA. "I pray for her, but I would have liked to do more," Koll added.

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Jean-Paul Belmondo remembered Antonelli as his "adorable" former girlfriend Laura. "Laura was for me above all an adorable companion, of exceptional charm," said the French acting legend, 82, who met Antonelli on the set of Claude Chabrol's Trap for a Wolf in 1972 and had a nine-year-long headline-grabbing relationship with her.

Actor and director Michele Placido told ANSA of his "exciting, but nervous" meeting with the then sex symbol on the set of 'Mio dio come sono sono caduta in basso'. "Thank God I met her when she was divine, the nation's Laura, loved by all Italians, myself included," he said. "She disturbed my dreams," he said.

Italian Culture Minister Dario Franceschini paid tribute to Antonelli as an "exceptional actress" while Northern League leader Matteo Salvini voiced the fond memories of many ordinary fans by tweeting "Great Laura, farewell. You made a whole generation dream..."

Antonelli will be buried in Ladispoli, most likely after Friday pending arrival of her brother Claudio from Canada, said Roberto Ussia, Ladispoli's councillor for social services.

Source: ANSA.

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2016 3:20 pm 
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Comic performer Gene Wilder kept his serious side off camera
By SANDY COHEN
August 30, 2016

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Revered as a comedic and storytelling genius by Hollywood's top entertainers, Gene Wilder was a humble man who downplayed his comic gifts, was a serious director and remained deferential to his longtime collaborator, Mel Brooks.

"I am him in fantasy," Wilder once said of playing the lead in Brooks' films. After Wilder's death was announced Monday, Brooks called his colleague "one of the truly great talents of our time." "He blessed every film we did together with his special magic and he blessed my life with his friendship," Brooks said in a statement. "He will be so missed."

Wilder died Sunday night of complications from Alzheimer's disease at age 83. His nephew, Jordan Walker-Pearlman, said Wilder was diagnosed with the disease three years ago, but kept the condition private so as not to disappoint fans.

Though Wilder started his acting career on the stage, millions knew him from his work in the movies, especially the ones he made with Brooks, such as "The Producers," ''Blazing Saddles" and "Young Frankenstein." The last film - with Wilder playing a California-born descendant of the mad scientist, insisting that his name is pronounced "Frahn-ken-SHTEEN" - was co-written by Brooks and Wilder and earned the pair an Oscar nod for adapted screenplay.

With his unkempt hair and big, buggy eyes, Wilder was a master at playing panicked characters caught up in schemes that only a madman such as Brooks could devise, whether reviving a monster in "Young Frankenstein" or bilking Broadway in "The Producers." Brooks would call him "God's perfect prey, the victim in all of us."

But he also knew how to keep it cool as the boozing gunslinger in "Blazing Saddles" or the charming candy man in "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory." His craziest role: the therapist having an affair with a sheep in Woody Allen's "Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex."

Wilder was close friends with Richard Pryor and their contrasting personas - Wilder uptight, Pryor loose - were ideal for comedy. They co-starred in four films: "Silver Streak," ''Stir Crazy," ''See No Evil, Hear No Evil" and "Another You."

But Wilder insisted he was not a comedian. He told Robert Osborne in 2013 it was the biggest misconception about him. "What a comic, what a funny guy, all that stuff! And I'm not. I'm really not. Except in a comedy in films," Wilder said. "But I make my wife laugh once or twice in the house, but nothing special. But when people see me in a movie and it's funny then they stop and say things to me about 'how funny you were.' But I don't think I'm that funny. I think I can be in the movies."

He could be quite serious, said actress Carol Kane, his co-star in 1977's "The World's Greatest Lover." "I don't think Gene was depressed, but he was very serious and very sensitive and not afraid to expose what many people would call a feminine side, an emotional side," she said Monday.

A Milwaukee native, Wilder was born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933. When he was 6, his mother suffered a heart attack that left her a semi-invalid. He soon began improvising comedy skits to entertain her, the first indication of his future career. He started taking acting classes at age 12 and continued studying through college.

In 1961, Wilder became a member of Lee Strasberg's prestigious Actor's Studio in Manhattan. That same year, he adopted the stage name Gene Wilder and made both his off-Broadway and Broadway debuts. He won the Clarence Derwent Award, given to promising newcomers, for the Broadway work in Graham Greene's comedy "The Complaisant Lover." A key break came when he co-starred with Anne Bancroft in Bertolt Brecht's "Mother Courage" in 1963 and met Brooks, her future husband.

A few years later, Brooks cast Wilder in "The Producers," for which Wilder was nominated for a supporting actor Academy Award. Brooks also encouraged Wilder to become a director himself. "He gave me the chutzpah to stand up on a chair and shout out: 'I don't know what the answer is! Somebody help me,'" Wilder told the Associated Press in a 1977 interview. "And when you can do that, people usually love you for it and rush in to help."

He went on to write several screenplays and direct five films. He married "Saturday Night Live" headliner Gilda Radner in 1984 and they costarred in two of his films: "The Woman in Red" and "Haunted Honeymoon." "He was compassionate and inspirational and poetic as a director," Kane recalled. "And clearly one of the great clowns - the Chaplin of talkies in some way, I would say."

Wilder's desire to tell his stories well led him to pay special attention to directing himself. "The tendency for most directors who direct themselves is to spend too little time on themselves, oddly enough. When you can finally say, 'Me, me,' you want to say, 'Oh, that's enough of me,' because it's more fun to direct the other actors than it is to direct yourself," he said in the 1977 AP interview. "When I look at the film with an audience, and I look up at the screen, I say, 'This is what I intended.'"

AP film writers Lindsey Bahr in Los Angeles and Jake Coyle in New York and former AP reporter Larry McShane contributed to this story.
Source: AP

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:14 pm 
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https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radi ... e-obituary

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/25/arts ... .html?_r=0

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 Post subject: Re: In Memory
PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:53 am 
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Actor Adam West who portrayed TV 'Batman' dies at age 88
By Gretel Johnston
June 10, 2017

Washington (dpa) - Adam West, the actor who brought the comic book character Batman to life on US television, has died at age 88 in Los Angeles, his family said Saturday.

Adam West died Friday night, according to a statement issued by the family on Facebook. "It's with great sadness that we are sharing this news. Adam West passed away peacefully last night after a short but brave battle with leukemia," the statement said. "There are no words to describe how much we'll miss him."

The television series "Batman" debuted on US television in 1966 and became a surprise hit, lasting three seasons. West played the campy masked "Caped Crusader" with sidekick Robin, played by Burt Ward.

Ward said he was devastated by the passing of his friend and co-star. “Adam and I had a special friendship for more than 50 years. We shared some of the most fun times of our lives together," Ward said in a statement quoted by Variety. "Our families have deep love and respect for each other. This is a terribly unexpected loss of my lifelong friend. I will forever miss him."

Ward said while several fine actors have portrayed Batman in Hollywood movies, "in my eyes, there was only one real Batman that is and always will be Adam West. He was truly the Bright Night.”

West played Batman in a 1966 movie adaptation of the comic book, but he became type-cast in the roll and struggled to find work after the television show was cancelled. Late in his career he accepted a voice-over role on the animated hit show "Family Guy."

West was honoured in 2012 with a star on the Walk of Fame on Hollywood Boulevard.

Some of the actors who played Batman on the big screen, including Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer and Ben Affleck, consulted West as they prepared for the famous role.

The family statement said West aspired to make a positive impact on his fans' lives. "We know you'll miss him too and we want you to know how much your love and support meant to him throughout the years," the statement posted on Facebook said.

Sourxe: dpa

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